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Tests: Technology on Newer Cars? watch

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    I already have a full driving licence, but I heard of some people taking their tests on newer cars. I was wondering, on my car for example
    (and not trying to brag about tech here - it's a family lease, half of tech doesn't work well anyway! But the principle is the same)

    Active Park Assist.
    Nothing in the guidelines say that you can't utilise technology installed in your car. So, for parallel park, what's to stop someone pulling up and using Park Assist to get a perfect angle on the space, and scoring full marks?

    Emergency Brake
    For emergency braking, we have 3 systems: Emergency Brake Assist Plus (or is it Active Brake Assist Plus? I forget the name), PreSafe and MBrace. The three work in tandem for emergency situations.

    If an object is detected, the car will automatically brake to stop a collision. Since the driver is in control of the vehicle, and the vehicle stops in emergencies by itself, then can they not pass the emergency stop straight through, or be able to "react" to a real one during a test without actually doing anything, and pass through with no minors, since the car was stopped in time?

    And, for when the Emergency/Active? Brake Assist Plus doesn't stop it in time, it then goes on to PreSafe and MBrace. The same applies for when you're travelling normally, then suddenly apply the brake quickly in force (as, for example, in a driving test emergency brake!)
    PreSafe activates the seatbelt tensioners, arms the airbags and does a few other chassis things with hydraulics I think, to make collisions less deadly.
    MBrace is a cellular network thing that is activated automatically whenever PreSafe is triggered - it connects to 999 with details of your gps location, occupancy, G-forces encountered, door mechanisms in case you need fire services to cut you out. It also automatically puts a 999 operator into the car handsfree system. It's there so that if you have a serious accident and are knocked unconscious, unable to call for help, the emergency services know where you are and what kind of accident you were in.

    Wouldn't this pose an issue that every time someone went to park, they can just let the car park itself?

    Or when they were told to do an emergency stop, they end up with actual emergency services being dispatched?
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    Why would performing an emergency stop cause the car to dial 999? That's absurd. 99% of the time an emergency stop doesn't mean you require the emergency services, you're just avoiding a hazard that appeared very suddenly.
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    (Original post by Dez)
    Why would performing an emergency stop cause the car to dial 999? That's absurd. 99% of the time an emergency stop doesn't mean you require the emergency services, you're just avoiding a hazard that appeared very suddenly.
    If the car experiences a high g load and the seatbelt pretensioners are activated, it automatically notifies emergency services of a possible collision. Can't turn that function off.
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    (Original post by Dez)
    Why would performing an emergency stop cause the car to dial 999? That's absurd. 99% of the time an emergency stop doesn't mean you require the emergency services, you're just avoiding a hazard that appeared very suddenly.
    True.
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    (Original post by XMaramena)
    If the car experiences a high g load and the seatbelt pretensioners are activated, it automatically notifies emergency services of a possible collision. Can't turn that function off.
    Surely it should only do that if there's an actual collision, i.e. airbags deployed? The amount of false alarms you'd get by calling out every time someone brakes harshly would be crazy.
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    (Original post by GeorgeAndLennie)
    True.
    (Original post by Dez)
    Surely it should only do that if there's an actual collision, i.e. airbags deployed? The amount of false alarms you'd get by calling out every time someone brakes harshly would be crazy.
    Both of the above I asked with incredulity at the dealership. You're both right, it does seem a little overkill. It doesn't require the airbags to be deployed, only the seatbelt tensioners to be activated by pre-safe, which is triggered with "sharp, aggressive braking".

    I suppose you could firmly but not too firmly press the brakes in a test and would probably get away with it. But if you suddenly slam your foot down hard on the brake pedal, it'll activate presafe.

    I guess there's a line between harsh braking, and "slam" braking.
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    (Original post by XMaramena)
    Both of the above I asked with incredulity at the dealership. You're both right, it does seem a little overkill. It doesn't require the airbags to be deployed, only the seatbelt tensioners to be activated by pre-safe, which is triggered with "sharp, aggressive braking".

    I suppose you could firmly but not too firmly press the brakes in a test and would probably get away with it. But if you suddenly slam your foot down hard on the brake pedal, it'll activate presafe.

    I guess there's a line between harsh braking, and "slam" braking.
    What car is this?
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    (Original post by Final Fantasy)
    What car is this?
    '15 C Class


    Although, I'm also giggling with the thought of someone being told to park, and just pulling up and using the auto-park function.

 
 
 
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