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    (Original post by dollyb1997)
    in the UK it doesnt necassarily because the BGS estimate the total recoverable reserves is 5.3 trillion cubic feet which accounts for around 2 years worth in the UK - Hardly enough to tear down prices as it does not have a great impact on the nations energy security. Also, gas prices fell in the US because they have a lower water cost and their shales were shallower than ours - it will be a more expensive process.
    Also, cuadrilla are financed by shareholders who are foreign investors so much of the profits will be sent to them
    But that is for present levels is it not? If say the Bowland Basin was to be extracted based on the estimated on page 12 of the AIB then energy bills would become lower to a certain extent. This is due to the fact that the UK will have to import less of gas which is an expensive commodity as a result of it's potentially improved security of supply, in addition to the basic principles of supply go demand - higher supply in comparison to demand = lower prices.
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    (Original post by odjack)
    Three main reasons:
    • He's a member of 'Defend Lytham', Friends of the Earth and stood as an anti-fracking candidate at the 2015 General Election, so his views are likely to be slanted, possibly biased, in an anti-fracking way which means the evidence he gives might not be telling the whole story.
    • He's beefed up his credentials to make him seem like a more valid source than he is. As a DECC spokesperson said, "filling in a consultation form doesn't make him an adviser."
    • Some of his information is false. E.g. he says "the composition of the fracking fluids need not be closed by the operators because of 'commercial sensitivity'" when in fact the Environment Agency does require full disclosure, and Cuadrilla discloses its chemicals on its website anyway.
    That's the gist of it, I think.
    Perfect! Thank you for your help💫
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    (Original post by psychemma)
    Just out of interest, where did you find these questions as I only have the ones from the ZigZag booklet which I think I kind of know now
    Can I have these questions from Zig zag please?
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    (Original post by Luis Suarez)
    Can I have these questions from Zig zag please?
    Someone posted them a few pages back I think
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    Question, have your teachers given you guidance on extra research, or have you done it yourselves?
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    (Original post by KGNines)
    But that is for present levels is it not? If say the Bowland Basin was to be extracted based on the estimated on page 12 of the AIB then energy bills would become lower to a certain extent. This is due to the fact that the UK will have to import less of gas which is an expensive commodity as a result of it's potentially improved security of supply, in addition to the basic principles of supply go demand - higher supply in comparison to demand = lower prices.
    true but not that significantly and it will be very temporary as we have nowhere near as much as the US
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    (Original post by KGNines)
    But that is for present levels is it not? If say the Bowland Basin was to be extracted based on the estimated on page 12 of the AIB then energy bills would become lower to a certain extent. This is due to the fact that the UK will have to import less of gas which is an expensive commodity as a result of it's potentially improved security of supply, in addition to the basic principles of supply go demand - higher supply in comparison to demand = lower prices.
    The problem is that despite the UK extracting more natural gas, the actual impact of this upon the global markets will be minute. We lack the volume of gas to really drive down energy bills for consumers, the price of gas is subject to the whims of the market and as supply is maintained at a somewhat constant level by the OPEC countries, then it is demand which has the greatest power to influence the price. It is as simply as you said: supply and demand; unfortunately the actual outputs of gas are not significant enough for energy prices to be driven down when we are (currently) a part of the EU. The chairman of Cuadrilla (Lord Brown) in 2013 publically stated that fracking would not drive down the price of gas or drive down energy prices, despite the claims of Osbourne and Cameron.
    Part of the reason for the genuinely significant fall in US energy prices was due to the fact that they keep a 'closed' market for gas and oil - meaning that they export no oil and very little gas xx
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    can anyone post their AIB annotated with SPEED (social, political, economic, environmental and demographic) on here. I tried having a go myself by struggled picking out the important stuff. thanks in advance
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    anyone know this too?10) Assess the future of coal power in the UK energy mix. 7) Many people arevery worried about the process of fracking. Give some recommendations as to howit could be improved, and justify them.
    12) Suggest how a survey might be conducted in a ruralcommunity.
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    Could someone explain about the recent third energy thing in Ryedale?
    Are they allowed to start fracking or just have a permit? If they are allowed to start fracking, when?
    Also are there any other companies and things going on like this?
    Thanks!
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    also what risks are there for fieldwork ??
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    Hi guys what kind of questions will they ask for the fieldwork part??
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    Does anyone have the mark scheme to the second zig zag paper? My teacher gave me the first and forgot to give me the second so i can't check my answers
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    What is this zigzag booklet????? Please explain
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    (Original post by dollyb1997)
    also what risks are there for fieldwork ??
    Some of the risks we talked about at school were just like really small things, so:

    - Crossing roads while conducting the survey (wear high vis jackets, stay on footpaths, walk facing oncoming traffic).
    - Meeting strangers (keep a mobile phone on your person, stay in a group, don't go inside houses).

    They all sound really stupid but it's all we thought of. I suppose you could maybe classify problems you could come across as risks?? Like people not answering, people lying, etc...because its a risk you'd get rubbish results??
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    (Original post by dollyb1997)
    also what risks are there for fieldwork ??
    dangers of people going out and knocking on peoples doors, could be animals, could get runover
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    (Original post by psychemma)
    I've mainly centered mine around who wrote it but also put in a bit about whether it's bias etc as this would affect the usefulness
    Could you send me how you've planned this question PLEASE??
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    (Original post by Pablo Snackbar)
    Anyone answered the question
    "Discuss how the physical and social geography of Lancashire makes this an ideal location to undertake fracking"

    Want to see what points people have made and if I'm heading in the right direction
    Physical:
    1) Apart from the pennines, there are large areas of flat land and without any Special scientific interest status.
    Flat land - infrastructure can be put into place hence increasing potential for fracking to occur
    no SSSI means that the land isn't controlled and protected so this makes it an ideal location for fracking because there won't be any resrictions on land use. A telegraph article proposes that currently, only 6% of the proposed fracking sites in the UK are SSSI
    2) marine shales in the area are up to 5000m thick- suggests that there's a lot of shale gas that can be yielded & plentiful supply
    3) Lancashire is located near the coast so this makes exportation of shale gas easy, through large ships..rather than pipelines, or trucks which would have caused congestion

    social:
    1) some areas in lancashire such as blackpool have high levels of poverty and have faced urban decline. Also manchester ans Liverpool are very densely populated
    so there's a high availability of workforce- ideal location for fracking because many are in need of jobs so they're less likely to object to fracking
    2) Lancashire have a traditional heavy industry including mining and power generation - people are more inclined to agree to fracking because they are already use to heavy industry and therefore, less likely to be affected by the noiss and air pollution
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    (Original post by Pablo Snackbar)
    Anyone answered the question
    "Discuss how the physical and social geography of Lancashire makes this an ideal location to undertake fracking"

    Want to see what points people have made and if I'm heading in the right direction
    social: area is poor and run down. loss of job opportunities and wealth. not that densely populated.

    physical: flat land, in the "both units perspective" so good for fracking, not an sssi, close to major roads so accessible.
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    (Original post by KatieNell)
    Some of the risks we talked about at school were just like really small things, so:

    - Crossing roads while conducting the survey (wear high vis jackets, stay on footpaths, walk facing oncoming traffic).
    - Meeting strangers (keep a mobile phone on your person, stay in a group, don't go inside houses).

    They all sound really stupid but it's all we thought of. I suppose you could maybe classify problems you could come across as risks?? Like people not answering, people lying, etc...because its a risk you'd get rubbish results??

    Always the chance of death
 
 
 
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