Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    whats the normal yearly salary and which part of it/computer science pays more
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by tufayl)
    whats the normal yearly salary and which part of it/computer science pays more
    Hi!

    Computer Science graduates would normally recieve an average starting salary of ~£23k-£26k per annum, though if you work in london there are many graduate job postings advertising at ~£28k-£36k per annum depending on the field you wish to work in.

    I would say areas such as Machine Learning/AI/Cyber Security/FinTech are the most lucrative fields to go into. However I would recommend studying modules that you (would) enjoy instead of going for routes which give you the most money. Having a passion for your expertise goes a lot further than simply gaining a trade simply becasue it pays well.

    Take what I say with a pinch of salt. I will tag TheMaster102 as he may have a bit more knowledge for you on this than I do.

    Hope this helps!
    • TSR Support Team
    Online

    20
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by tufayl)
    whats the normal yearly salary and which part of it/computer science pays more
    For the higher end, large top tech companies (and top startups) with offices in the UK pay way above market than the rest of the companies here.

    - Google and Facebook are about ~£45-50k base + bonus + stock grants for new grad software engineers. Although, this is a lot lower than what's available in their US HQs and similar software engineering markets like Zurich etc.
    - Some smaller companies (Palantir, Uber, Box etc) will be around in line with the above
    - Other well known tech companies are more in the £32-40k starting range (Amazon, Microsoft, ARM etc)
    - Banks pay around £35-40k for their tech analysts in London
    - High frequency trading firms/quant hedge funds are also on the higher end of the market

    Outside of this group, you'll find that average starting salaries fall into the £25-30k range in London, £18-25k outside of London.

    I'd not focus on salary as your main determinant for where you want to work though! Look at the people you'll be working with, the technologies you'd be using, what sort of projects you'd be working on etc. There's more to life than optimizing for salary; not to mention the uncertainty around landing a gig at the companies that pay at the higher end of the scale.

    Standard grad roles are: Software (Development) Engineer, Technical Consultant, Product/Program Manager, Data Scientist etc

    As for which areas tend to pay more I'd agree with the above: fintech, trading companies, Cyber Security, Big Data, AI

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Princepieman)
    For the higher end, large top tech companies (and top startups) with offices in the UK pay way above market than the rest of the companies here.

    - Google and Facebook are about ~£45-50k base + bonus + stock grants for new grad software engineers. Although, this is a lot lower than what's available in their US HQs and similar software engineering markets like
    - Some smaller companies (Palantir, Uber, Box etc) will be around in line with the above
    - Other well known tech companies are more in the £32-40k starting range (Amazon, Microsoft, ARM etc)
    - Banks pay around £35-40k for their tech analysts in London
    - High frequency trading firms/quant hedge funds are also on the higher end of the market

    Outside of this group, you'll find that average starting salaries fall into the £25-30k range in London, £18-25k outside of London.

    I'd not focus on salary as your main determinant for where you want to work though! Look at the people you'll be working with, the technologies you'd be using, what sort of projects you'd be working on etc. There's more to life than optimizing for salary; not to mention the uncertainty around landing a gig at the companies that pay at the higher end of the scale.

    Standard grad roles are: Software (Development) Engineer, Technical Consultant, Product/Program Manager, Data Scientist etc

    As for which areas tend to pay more I'd agree with the above: fintech, trading companies, Cyber Security, Big Data, AI

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Does it matter where you study computer science? This is a dilemma I'm having. You seem quite well informed.

    I'm thinking about going QMUL for computer science. I'm hard working and wouldn't mind doing a job that doesn't pay well. But I would hope that after I while I would be able to apply for some of the jobs you mentioned.

    Could you explain more?
    • TSR Support Team
    Online

    20
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by Chrollo-Lucilfer)
    Does it matter where you study computer science? This is a dilemma I'm having. You seem quite well informed.

    I'm thinking about going QMUL for computer science. I'm hard working and wouldn't mind doing a job that doesn't pay well. But I would hope that after I while I would be able to apply for some of the jobs you mentioned.

    Could you explain more?
    Generally, no. For some companies however, it is taken into account (mostly the smaller quant hedge funds/proprietary trading houses).

    What you have to do at uni to stand a chance is as follows:
    - Code in your spare time. This is paramount, there are so many resources out there that you could make use of to learn different languages - start using them. Also, get on GitHub and contribute to any existing open source projects. These top tech firms LOVE to see people list their projects and previous work.
    - Code with others. Attend hackathons! You're in London, so make use of the tech community there by going to 24 hour hackathons where you just bash out code with a couple of friends or even people you've never met before
    - Maintain a strong academic performance. Despite all of the above, you still need to set your aim on getting at least a 2:1
    - Gain responsibility. Teach others on your course! There's nothing better than someone committed to helping others do well via tutoring, it also shows that you have a firm grasp of your subject. Look out for opportunities to become a representative of your course/university. Also in here: get involved with socieities, play sports, volunteer; overall just find areas where you'll be given extra responsibilities
    - Get experience. This is huge. There are countless amounts of opportunities to freelance whilst at uni, reach out to people in need of coding assistance and start building solutions for them. Cold call startups in your first year to see if they'd need an extra hand or two.

    ^ If you do the above, and format your experience in a succinct CV, you will get interviews from most top tech companies. To pass said interviews, you'll need to learn how to navigate a coding interview: Crack the Coding Interview and Programming Interviews Exposed are the best resources for those. Plus, if you're applying to quant HFs or prop houses, make sure your mental maths is **** hot.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: March 25, 2016
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What's your favourite Christmas sweets?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.