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Post why you love multiculturalism! watch

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    (Original post by Foo.mp3)
    Which part don'tcha get babe?
    I mean,can you reword all of that as if explaining to an imbecile?
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    I feel like multiculturalism is making our generation more open. I know many of the kids in my generation have very close-minded strict probably racist parents (let's not kid ourselves mkay :lol:) so when you're at the age where you start going to school you see people very different to you and you're like whaaaat :eek3:
    but then as you grow up and find that underneath it all they're actually the same as you in many ways, and it's helping us integrate and understand each other, and it's helping us teach our parents about other cultures, and slowly but surely we're moving in a positive direction as a society
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    (Original post by z33)
    I know many of the kids in my generation have very close-minded strict probably racist parents (let's not kid ourselves mkay :lol:)
    Asian parents... :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by RobML)
    Asian parents... :rolleyes:
    yuppp :lol:
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    I don't because true multi-culturalism doesn't exist, at least not in the west. The different ethnic groups tend to clump together with their own kind in any given town or city and stay segregated from any other ethnic groups thus contributing to misunderstanding and mistrust. It is better for community cohesion and society for a particular country to be mono-cultured. Multiculturalism promotes 'the fear of the other' and results in a fractured community; it also feeds racism and hate. Multiculturalism is bad. Ethnic minorities also tend to be a threat to the ethnic majority of a given country (no prizes for guessing which one I'm talking about here) due to the fact they feel marginalised.
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    Because getting to know people from many different backgrounds compliments your open-mindedness and listening to how they think about things or see things can help your thinking too.
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    (Original post by TreeFellOnMe)
    getting to know people from many different backgrounds compliments your open-mindedness
    you mean, like "what great open-mindedness you have here" or "would like to have such a nice open-mindedness"or "best open-mindedness I have seen in years" etc etc

    just joking
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    (Original post by jambojim97)
    Because I loved being raped by Muslim gangs.
    :confused:
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    OP claims to be tolerant, then argues with anyone who opposes their opinion and is childish in doing so.
    • Political Ambassador
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    Political Ambassador
    (Original post by Armastan)
    OP claims to be tolerant, then argues with anyone who opposes their opinion and is childish in doing so.
    Shalom <3
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    (Original post by katieMCR)
    As someone who wants to be a chef and is going to catering college I like the idea of having all these world foods and recipes in my life.
    That's Cultural Appropriation, didn't you know?
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    (Original post by RobML)
    I mean,can you reword all of that as if explaining to an imbecile?
    Ok, it means: girly softies are out vs. old skool masculine Anglo-Saxons, plus pride in and protection of the nation, its heritage, and values, are in, and our civilisation (the West) is becoming united against another, incompatible, somewhat threatening civilisation (Muslim world)
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    eeeerrrrrr.............I like kebabs. Other than that it dont matter to me coz I is colorblind.
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    i only like multiculturalism because of the food
    in all other areas it is an abysmal failure as nobody integrates beyond their ethnic groups really
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    (Original post by Lady Comstock)
    South and East Asian food is more of an example of assimilation than multiculturalism in my view. The Indian restaurant that we all enjoy is a mutation/appropriation of a culture's cuisine - it's "Indian" food adapted to us rather than an example of an authentic, untainted cultural practice being able to flourish on its own without interference, which is essentially what multiculturalism mandates.
    I agree to an extent, but I don't think traditional British multiculturalism in its most popular and encouraged interpretation is the championing of completely unaltered customs. If so, the NHS for example wouldn't have stood the test of time. I believe up to now the traditional concept of multiculturalism is one that also encourages assimilation whilst acknowledging background, creed and the like. I still find it hard to believe that the old school West Midlands Balti is not a product of multiculturalism. I do see it as an appreciation and an adaptation of another culture, but it would definitely come under my definition of multiculturalism.

    Compare this to France, a nation that encourages assimilation so much it doesn't take data on ethnic minorities, refuses to recognise regional languages and pursues an almost contrived form of secularism that prior to the refugee crisis ironically propelled relgion to the forefront of debate more strikingly than perhaps would have been otherwise.

    Given the difference between the British and French assimilation systems and how recent events are now making us fear for our lives quite equally, I honestly think the debates on multiculturalism miss the point. Multiculturalism is not the problem, but lack of integration and marginalisation that ensues when Muslims are accused of 'not doing enough'. Islam is a problem, without doubt, but history has told us the more you say 'no' to a sect of society, the more they act in defiance until one of the two sides resorts to violent enforcement/rebellion and sympathy among their clan. This has been the case in France.
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    (Original post by rockrunride)
    I agree to an extent, but I don't think traditional British multiculturalism in its most popular and encouraged interpretation is the championing of completely unaltered customs. If so, the NHS for example wouldn't have stood the test of time. I believe up to now the traditional concept of multiculturalism is one that also encourages assimilation whilst acknowledging background, creed and the like. I still find it hard to believe that the old school West Midlands Balti is not a product of multiculturalism. I do see it as an appreciation and an adaptation of another culture, but it would definitely come under my definition of multiculturalism.

    Compare this to France, a nation that encourages assimilation so much it doesn't take data on ethnic minorities, refuses to recognise regional languages and pursues an almost contrived form of secularism that prior to the refugee crisis ironically propelled relgion to the forefront of debate more strikingly than perhaps would have been otherwise.

    Given the difference between the British and French assimilation systems and how recent events are now making us fear for our lives quite equally, I honestly think the debates on multiculturalism miss the point. Multiculturalism is not the problem, but lack of integration and marginalisation that ensues when Muslims are accused of 'not doing enough'. Islam is a problem, without doubt, but history has told us the more you say 'no' to a sect of society, the more they act in defiance until one of the two sides resorts to violent enforcement/rebellion and sympathy among their clan. This has been the case in France.

    Did you watch that programme called 'Make Leicester British again' ?

    There was a second generation Indian who owned a cornershop, he loved the UK and its traditions and embraced our culture with open arms.

    Then there was a Muslim from Africa I believe, she chose to stick to her faith first, everything else came second. She didnt give a damn about assimilating, she literally despised the UK despite fleeing here.

    The cornershop owner actually ended up arguing with the woman because she just didnt care about integrating into society. Her faith and culture came first and she would not yield even slightly.

    The only reason the minorities are pushed aside is because of their own doing.

    The former is multiculturalism done right, the latter is not, which i feel is more prominent.
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    (Original post by Straighthate)
    The only reason the minorities are pushed aside is because of their own doing.

    The former is multiculturalism done right, the latter is not, which i feel is more prominent.
    Well, I would make argue that the Labour party is somewhat to blame too...
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    Food that tastes of something, unlike British food.
    • Thread Starter
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    (Original post by mariachi)
    are you aware that the UK has abandoned multiculturalism as an official policy since at least 2011 ?
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multic...United_Kingdom

    the new buzzword is "community cohesion"
    I didn't know that, thanks

    (Original post by z33)
    I feel like multiculturalism is making our generation more open. I know many of the kids in my generation have very close-minded strict probably racist parents (let's not kid ourselves mkay :lol:) so when you're at the age where you start going to school you see people very different to you and you're like whaaaat :eek3:
    but then as you grow up and find that underneath it all they're actually the same as you in many ways, and it's helping us integrate and understand each other, and it's helping us teach our parents about other cultures, and slowly but surely we're moving in a positive direction as a society
    Yes!

    (Original post by TreeFellOnMe)
    Because getting to know people from many different backgrounds compliments your open-mindedness and listening to how they think about things or see things can help your thinking too.


    (Original post by Dodgypirate)
    That's Cultural Appropriation, didn't you know?
    I'm not an expert on cultural appropriation, but its all about respect of other cultures. So long as you show respect, then you aren't appropriating

    (Original post by Straighthate)
    i like multiculturalism because of the food
    (Original post by Dom2375)
    Food that tastes of something, unlike British food.
    Haha too true!
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    (Original post by Multiculturalism)

    I'm not an expert on cultural appropriation, but its all about respect of other cultures. So long as you show respect, then you aren't appropriating




    I was being satirical lol :lol: Sorry if it wasn't clear. I can't stand the term because it's so often used in the wrong context
 
 
 
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