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    ???
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    Did you invest in the hair cut?
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    its not your money okay
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    What happened to the credit card you maxed out? :holmes:
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    Gold is a long-term profit investment . If you wanna make money on it then you buy loads of small amounts when the price is low then sell it after 3+ years when the price goes up so there's no reason you can't do both
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    (Original post by hihihihihi)
    Did you invest in the hair cut?
    apparently so
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    (Original post by iEthan)
    What happened to the credit card you maxed out? :holmes:
    i cashed in some of my gold to pay it off. I still owe some however, but i am getting my last student finance on the 4th of april, which gives me some more flexibility.
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    If you care about reducing your debt now, do that first. If you're going to delay repayment, make sure you're putting money in something with a higher expected return than the cost of the loan. Further education is an obvious destination. Gold is very unlikely to be in that category.
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    (Original post by john2054)
    i cashed in some of my gold to pay it off. I still owe some however, but i am getting my last student finance on the 4th of april, which gives me some more flexibility.
    Oh boy!!!!
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    (Original post by JavaScriptMaster)
    Gold is a long-term profit investment . If you wanna make money on it then you buy loads of small amounts when the price is low then sell it after 3+ years when the price goes up so there's no reason you can't do both
    Thanks, i may just do that.
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    (Original post by Camilli)
    If you care about reducing your debt now, do that first. If you're going to delay repayment, make sure you're putting money in something with a higher expected return than the cost of the loan. Further education is an obvious destination. Gold is very unlikely to be in that category.
    hmmm i don't know what to say back to this? Clearly paying off my debit cards would be the sensible option i guess?
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    What rate are they charging?

    Remember, that this will be after-tax. To do better, you'd have to get the interest rate plus enough to cover any income tax on the earnings. I don't know what taxes are where you live, but if you're covering, say, 18%, that could mean needing to earn over 25% pretax. Hard work, and not something to just count on.
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    (Original post by Camilli)
    What rate are they charging?

    Remember, that this will be after-tax. To do better, you'd have to get the interest rate plus enough to cover any income tax on the earnings. I don't know what taxes are where you live, but if you're covering, say, 18%, that could mean needing to earn over 25% pretax. Hard work, and not something to just count on.
    I think in my country (the UK) credit cards are exempt from tax. I pay about 30% p.a. on most of my cards, and about 6% on my student account. But I would like to pay them off. Actually the last time i took out money, it was to give my wife a top up worth £600. Such are the costs of marriage i guess!??
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    Paying down the card amounts to a risk-free 30% return after taxes.
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    (Original post by Camilli)
    Paying down the card amounts to a risk-free 30% return after taxes.
    I guess so. I am actually thinking of applying for a new credit card in the next couple of months or so, just to maximise the credit limit i have available, at any one point?
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    If you need the credit, then you need it. But it will cost you. Just make sure that you get more for your money after you spend it than you are paying to the bank.
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    (Original post by Camilli)
    Paying down the card amounts to a risk-free 30% return after taxes.
    But then the student debt only costs something like 1.5% pa but, i will owe something like £25k next month, so i would like to start to bring this down as well, even though i 'technically' don't have to, until i start work!??!
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    (Original post by Camilli)
    If you need the credit, then you need it. But it will cost you. Just make sure that you get more for your money after you spend it than you are paying to the bank.
    I also want to pay for a good virus checker (Malware bytes, subscription).
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    That hair is way better mate good choice.

    As for people saying it's not his money, a loan is a loan, the idea that people cannot use loans to invest undermines the entire economy so quit being a peasant.
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    Pay then just invest later.
 
 
 
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