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2016 Official AQA New Spec AS Level Physics Paper 1 - 24th of May 2016 Watch

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    Specimen papers (set 2)
    Paper 1: http://physicsloreto.weebly.com/uplo..._1_qp_v1.0.pdf
    Paper 1 mark scheme: http://physicsloreto.weebly.com/uplo..._1_ms_v1.0.pdf

    Paper 2: http://physicsloreto.weebly.com/uplo..._2_qp_v1.1.pdf
    Paper 2 mark scheme: http://physicsloreto.weebly.com/uplo..._2_ms_v1.0.pdf


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    im going to fail
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    When it asks you to say how many fringes there are and it already gives you, say, n=2 then would the answer be 5 because there are 5 total fringes or would it be 2 because n=2?
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    (Original post by not_lucas1)
    When it asks you to say how many fringes there are and it already gives you, say, n=2 then would the answer be 5 because there are 5 total fringes or would it be 2 because n=2?
    5, n is just reference for the different surge of light so to speak.
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    (Original post by EggFriedRai)
    5, n is just reference for the different surge of light so to speak.
    Thanks, btw for the formula of phase difference what does path difference mean? 2pi(d)/lambda The d?
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    Kill Me.
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    (Original post by not_lucas1)
    Not looking forward to this exam, seems like its going to be pretty hard. Why does our year seem to get the specification change every time leaving us with barely any resources?!?!

    Ikr, it seems we're like lab rats for the exam boards.
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    (Original post by JakeRStudent)
    During excitation photons have to have an energy equal to the difference in energy levels, but do colliding electrons? Can an electron with a kinetic energy greater than the difference in energy levels collide and excite the electron?
    Excitation simply is when a gas atom absorbs energy from a colliding electron without being ionised therefore a colliding electron must have lost all of its KE when it causes excitation as the electron inside the inner shells move to a higher shell.

    De-excitation is the opposite electron's that move to the outer shell leave a vacancy sooner or later that vacancy is filled with an electron in the outer shell transferring to it - when this happens electrons emit a photon and move to a lower energy level.
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    I know, sort of getting annoyed with it
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    i know sort of getting annoyed now
    (Original post by S17OTC)
    Ikr, it seems we're like lab rats for the exam boards.
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    anyone know any good last minute revision websites? And help remembering these feynman diagrams cannot seem to remember them. ARGH!!
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    I don't understand why AQA have made the new physics papers so difficult... its not like too many people were getting high grades before in the last spec, hence the reason the mark needed for an A was usually around 70-75% (in other subjects such as maths this is usually 85+%).
    I also do AQA for the newly reformed psychology A-level and the specimen papers for this are of the same difficulty of the past papers for the old spec imo.
    So WHY have they done this to physics?
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    (Original post by Nick_PS4)
    anyone know any good last minute revision websites? And help remembering these feynman diagrams cannot seem to remember them. ARGH!!
    Make some flashcards on the feynman diagram and write the symbol equations beneath them. I doubt they'll be on the exam though; they'd rather ask us to work out the radius of a pipe.
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    (Original post by EggFriedRai)
    5, n is just reference for the different surge of light so to speak.
    Whats this for
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    (Original post by Nick_PS4)
    anyone know any good last minute revision websites? And help remembering these feynman diagrams cannot seem to remember them. ARGH!!
    Just remember the equations for: Beta minus decay, beta plus decay, electromagnetic interactions (just repulsion), strong interactions, proton antineutrino interaction, neutron neutrino interaction, electron capture, and proton electron interaction. If you remember the equations just put them on the vertices of a Feynman diagram then make up the exchange particle (and direction) which works.
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    can someone differentiate between work function and threshold frequency for me? I think its work function is the minimum energy required by a photon to cause the photoelectric effect and the threshold frequency is the minimum frequency of the photon for that to occur?
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    (Original post by 11234)
    Whats this for
    diffraction grating, the separate fringes , the total number of fringes is different to the n = 2 crap
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    (Original post by not_lucas1)
    can someone differentiate between work function and threshold frequency for me? I think its work function is the minimum energy required by a photon to cause the photoelectric effect and the threshold frequency is the minimum frequency of the photon for that to occur?
    This is right you got this!
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    is it me or do you feel ready content wise but not for the exams?
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    (Original post by Exavior)
    Just remember the equations for: Beta minus decay, beta plus decay, electromagnetic interactions (just repulsion), strong interactions, proton antineutrino interaction, neutron neutrino interaction, electron capture, and proton electron interaction. If you remember the equations just put them on the vertices of a Feynman diagram then make up the exchange particle (and direction) which works.
    are proton-antineutrino and neutron-neutrino on the spec? because i've never seen those?
 
 
 
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