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Official OCR New Spec AS Level Physics: Depth in physics - 9th of May Watch

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    (Original post by lovelyqueen)
    Do you think electricity and internal resistance is going to come up.
    Did it come up in the breadth paper. I cant remember.
    You need to know your content - end of.
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    (Original post by lovelyqueen)
    Do you think electricity and internal resistance is going to come up.
    Did it come up in the breadth paper. I cant remember.
    I don't think there was much on it, possibly not at all.

    (Original post by Marxist)
    You need to know your content - end of.
    Precisely. Just learn/revise everything- then you won't have to worry about what some random person on the internet thinks might come up.
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    (Original post by lovelyqueen)
    Do you think electricity and internal resistance is going to come up.
    Did it come up in the breadth paper. I cant remember.
    im pretty sure it did come up (internal resistance) there will definitely be some stuff on electricity probably potentiometers and potential dividers
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    (Original post by wasdfhghj)
    im pretty sure it did come up (internal resistance) there will definitely be some stuff on electricity probably potentiometers and potential dividers
    Do u have any idea about the practical questions that is going to come up?
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    Quick question, is the resultant force always in the direction of acceleration since F=ma and mass is constant?

    For example if an object is falling and decelerating, the resultant force is upwards right?
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    voltz check this pls http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...4100393&page=2
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    (Original post by lovelyqueen)
    Do u have any idea about the practical questions that is going to come up?
    idk lovely queen lol funny name
    had to make a new account

    probably not stuff thats been in specimens or in the breadth paper
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    (Original post by voltz)
    Quick question, is the resultant force always in the direction of acceleration since F=ma and mass is constant?

    For example if an object is falling and decelerating, the resultant force is upwards right?
    The resultant force F is always in the direction of motion. So you have to resolve accordingly, and take this account if there is more than one force acting on an object.
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    (Original post by lovelyqueen)
    Do u have any idea about the practical questions that is going to come up?
    Heres are Q&A of practicals from past paper and list of practicals that we have learnt
    Attached Files
  1. File Type: docx Required Practicals Physics.docx (15.9 KB, 155 views)
  2. File Type: docx Experiments.docx (268.2 KB, 136 views)
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    (Original post by Turtlebunny)
    The resultant force F is always in the direction of motion. So you have to resolve accordingly, and take this account if there is more than one force acting on an object.
    Im just a bit confused because I was doing a past question where the object was falling but slowing down and the mark scheme said that drag > weight?
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    Predictions for tomorrows paper?
    do you reckon there will be a lot of mechanics?
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    (Original post by voltz)
    Im just a bit confused because I was doing a past question where the object was falling but slowing down and the mark scheme said that drag > weight?
    Force affects acceleration so if the resultant force < 0 the acceleration will be < 0 too if the mass is constant (deceleration). So yes, the resultant force will act in the direction of acceleration, if that makes sense
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    (Original post by voltz)
    Im just a bit confused because I was doing a past question where the object was falling but slowing down and the mark scheme said that drag > weight?
    Are you sure it said that drag > weight? That could only happen if an object exceeded its terminal velocity somehow. The only example I can think of this happening is, for example, the moment at which a parachutist would open his chute, and he moves from his old terminal velocity to a new velocity as drag suddenly increase as a result of the parachute.

    Otherwise, I'm not too sure how drag > weight. Drag can be equal to weight, therefore giving a resultant force of 0, meaning they aren't accelerating.
    In the case of resolving a falling object with two forces acting on it, drag and weight, I would do W - D = F. Because it is falling downwards you take weight as the positive value and resolve in that direction.

    Could you post the question?
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    (Original post by mm_7)
    Predictions for tomorrows paper?
    do you reckon there will be a lot of mechanics?
    I hope there's a lot of mechanics
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    (Original post by Turtlebunny)
    Are you sure it said that drag > weight? That could only happen if an object exceeded its terminal velocity somehow. The only example I can think of this happening is, for example, the moment at which a parachutist would open his chute, and he moves from his old terminal velocity to a new velocity as drag suddenly increase as a result of the parachute.

    Otherwise, I'm not too sure how drag > weight. Drag can be equal to weight, therefore giving a resultant force of 0, meaning they aren't accelerating.
    In the case of resolving a falling object with two forces acting on it, drag and weight, I would do W - D = F. Because it is falling downwards you take weight as the positive value and resolve in that direction.

    Could you post the question?
    This is what the mark scheme says word for word:
    Drag > weight The ball is decelerating/‘slowing down’
    It is a terminal velocity question and at this point (for which the answer is as quoted above), the graph shows the object decelerating non-uniformly.

    This is the question paper - question 4.
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    less than 24 hours to go, I'm not looking forward for this exam
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    (Original post by voltz)
    This is what the mark scheme says word for word:
    Drag > weight The ball is decelerating/‘slowing down’
    It is a terminal velocity question and at this point (for which the answer is as quoted above), the graph shows the object decelerating non-uniformly.

    This is the question paper - question 4.
    Resultant force is always in the direction of acceleration, but not necessarily motion. As the ball enters the liquid, it does decelerate to terminal velocity. The moment the ball enters the water is analogous to a parachutist opening their parachute. Drag > weight, so the resultant force is upwards, so the ball decelerates downwards (i.e. accelerates upwards)
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    Is this for Physics B?
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    do you think that there will be a lot of photoelectric effect and youngs double slit
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    (Original post by Btec certified)
    Is this for Physics B?
    It's for Physics A
 
 
 
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