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Why do some people get toned/ muscular easier then others Watch

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    does it have something to do with your genes?
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    I don't know what you mean by toned.

    In terms of muscle gain, it's a whole variety of things that come into play. So to make it easy;

    let's say you have two men, both 70kg, 180cm. They do the same workout program.

    Now, the difference in muscle gain will be primarily determined by:

    Diet, genetics factors like muscle insertion (attachments/origin etc), hormone levels, muscle fiber types and then things like ability to recover (genetics are involved here as well as age), sleep quality etc. Then your actual technique on the lifts. Limb length/ratio comes into play, all sorts. It's hard to narrow it down.

    So many things!
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    (Original post by MountKimbie)
    I don't know what you mean by toned.

    In terms of muscle gain, it's a whole variety of things that come into play. So to make it easy;

    let's say you have two men, both 70kg, 180cm. They do the same workout program.

    Now, the difference in muscle gain will be primarily determined by:

    Diet, genetics factors like muscle insertion (attachments/origin etc), hormone levels, muscle fiber types and then things like ability to recover. Sleep quality. Then your actual technique on the lifts. Limb length comes into play.

    So many things!
    Being toned is having some muscle definition but nothing crazy.
    Why does sleep quality matter?
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    (Original post by xobeauty)
    Being toned is having some muscle definition but nothing crazy.
    Why does sleep quality matter?
    Muscle definition would be more related to bodyfat percentage?

    By working out, to simplify it, you're essentially causing micro-tears in the muscle through stimulation. In order for your muscles to repair and build more muscle to adapt to the new stimulation, you need to recover. Humans do this through sleep. Bad quality sleep affects recovery.
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    It's to do with your body type I seem to remember.

    You're either an endomorrph,ectomorph or the other one.

    And there isn't much you can do to change your basic type but you should work out which type you are so that you don't waste too much time and effort and disappointment trying to do the impossible.
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    (Original post by MountKimbie)
    Muscle definition would be more related to bodyfat percentage?

    By working out, to simplify it, you're essentially causing micro-tears in the muscle through stimulation. In order for your muscles to repair and build more muscle to adapt to the new stimulation, you need to recover. Humans do this through sleep. Bad quality sleep affects recovery.
    Are you kidding me man God sometimes I regret asking questions.

    Thanks for your insight.

    One more question. How do you know when to take a rest day? Say you workout and the next day you can't even bend your legs because you're aching, should you push through and continue with the workout the next day, or skip a day.
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    (Original post by moggis)
    It's to do with your body type I seem to remember.

    You're either an endomorrph,ectomorph or the other one.

    And there isn't much you can do to change your basic type but you should work out which type you are so that you don't waste too much time and effort and disappointment trying to do the impossible.
    Mesomorph I think it's called. But these somatotypes are outdated and don't really apply to real people. It was originally developed as part of a psychology study and not for exercise science, but somebody else will need to correct me on that.
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    (Original post by xobeauty)
    Are you kidding me man God sometimes I regret asking questions.

    Thanks for your insight.

    One more question. How do you know when to take a rest day? Say you workout and the next day you can't even bend your legs because you're aching, should you push through and continue with the workout the next day, or skip a day.
    Are you following a workout program? It should take into account rest days. If you are new to fitness, it could be difficult to trust yourself on when to take a rest day.

    Generally, you get used to the aching (Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness - DOMS) over time and you can train through it. Recently when I've got back into training, I decided to work out even though I was aching really bad. I had a terrible session and could hardly walk, I got really bad leg spasms haha.

    If you're aching in a certain bodypart, you could still go to the gym and train something else?

    To be honest, you can train 7 days a week and not need a whole day off, as long as you are eating correctly, training with good form and getting good quality 7+ hours of sleep a day.
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    (Original post by MountKimbie)
    Muscle definition would be more related to bodyfat percentage?

    By working out, to simplify it, you're essentially causing micro-tears in the muscle through stimulation. In order for your muscles to repair and build more muscle to adapt to the new stimulation, you need to recover. Humans do this through sleep. Bad quality sleep affects recovery.
    I would agree to an extent. You also need to remember someone who has worked out but his muscles feel soft etc may not be the result of high body fat % but also carb depletion, low glycogen etc.


    (Original post by MountKimbie)
    Mesomorph I think it's called. But these somatotypes are outdated and don't really apply to real people. It was originally developed as part of a psychology study and not for exercise science, but somebody else will need to correct me on that.
    There are a million(exaggerated) different types of body types and there's too many variables to consider. I believe body type may determine your starting point but other factors play a larger role in the long run I.e diet/nutrition, genetics, sleeps etc.

    (Original post by xobeauty)
    does it have something to do with your genes?
    Q) How come you're still up at 4:20am? :shock:
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    (Original post by XxKingSniprxX)
    I would agree so. Also, someone who has worked out but his muscles feel soft may be the result of high body fat %, carb depletion, low glycogen etc.




    There are a million(exaggerated) different types of body types and there's too many variables to consider. I believe body type may determine your starting point but other factors play a larger role in the long run I.e diet/nutrition, genetics, sleeps etc.



    Q) How come you're still up at 4:20am? :shock:
    It's only 1:04 where I am.

    My conclusion is, I'm going to workout through the pain everyday. It's actually not feeling too bad anymore.
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    (Original post by xobeauty)
    It's only 1:04 where I am.

    My conclusion is, I'm going to workout through the pain everyday. It's actually not feeling too bad anymore.
    Where are you from? I just noticed that you're from Canada
    Are you currently studying at university of Toronto or are you still applying to places?

    I'm from UK and thought most people on this forum were aswell :lol:
    I do see a lot of international students on the forum.

    Its nice to see a broad spectrum of students each going after their own goals
    and in a way its easier to make friends with similar interests/ask for advice on xyz.
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    (Original post by moggis)
    It's to do with your body type I seem to remember.

    You're either an endomorrph,ectomorph or the other one.

    And there isn't much you can do to change your basic type but you should work out which type you are so that you don't waste too much time and effort and disappointment trying to do the impossible.
    Mesomorph That is I!
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    (Original post by XxKingSniprxX)
    I would agree to an extent. You also need to remember someone who has worked out but his muscles feel soft etc may not be the result of high body fat % but also carb depletion, low glycogen etc.
    That's not the context of which the OP probably meant though. I avoid using the word toned all together. It has different meanings according to different people and it's just a pointless term.

    What the hell is 'getting toned'. You either increase your muscle mass. Or you decrease your bf.

    (Bodybuilders/athletes competing in weight categories worry about the things you mention but that doesn't apply to 99% of the people on this forum)

    (Original post by XxKingSniprxX)
    There are a million(exaggerated) different types of body types and there's too many variables to consider. I believe body type may determine your starting point but other fa:shock:ctors play a larger role in the long run I.e diet/nutrition, genetics, sleeps etc.
    I wouldn't worry a new trainee with trying to determine their body type and therefore their training style.
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    (Original post by xobeauty)
    Are you kidding me man God sometimes I regret asking questions.

    Thanks for your insight.

    One more question. How do you know when to take a rest day? Say you workout and the next day you can't even bend your legs because you're aching, should you push through and continue with the workout the next day, or skip a day.
    Don't worry about asking questions. :lol: I wish I asked more questions and researched more when I was first starting out as it would have saved me a few solid months where I could have made more progress.

    Knowledge = key to success.

    I agree with everything @MountKimbie mentioned but also would say as a beginner into working out if you feel like you're physically taxing your body and your body parts are aching, simply take a rest day or two. Alternatively, you could work a different muscle group I.e legs sore but you could focus on a upper body split etc. Over time, you get used to DOMs and are better at being able to tell when your body needs rest days.

    (Original post by MountKimbie)
    Are you following a workout program? It should take into account rest days. If you are new to fitness, it could be difficult to trust yourself on when to take a rest day.

    Generally, you get used to the aching (Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness - DOMS) over time and you can train through it. Recently when I've got back into training, I decided to work out even though I was aching really bad. I had a terrible session and could hardly walk, I got really bad leg spasms haha.

    If you're aching in a certain bodypart, you could still go to the gym and train something else?

    To be honest, you can train 7 days a week and not need a whole day off, as long as you are eating correctly, training with good form and getting good quality 7+ hours of sleep a day.
    I agree that although it is possible, I doubt it will be sustainable due to not only external factors but also a possible loss of enthusiasm for training I.e going through the motions if you don't take rest days.

    Imo a deload week is essential in training as the mental game is just as significant as the physical game.
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    (Original post by MountKimbie)
    That's not the context of which the OP probably meant though. I avoid using the word toned all together. It has different meanings according to different people and it's just a pointless term.

    What the hell is 'getting toned'. You either increase your muscle mass. Or you decrease your bf.

    (Bodybuilders/athletes competing in weight categories worry about the things you mention but that doesn't apply to 99% of the people on this forum)



    I wouldn't worry a new trainee with trying to determine their body type and therefore their training style.
    I agree I hear the word "toned" by several people but everyone has a different perception of it, hence why I try not to use the word aswell.

    Sorry .. :lol:

    Yeah, exactly as everyone is different though the core principles remain the same for everyone.
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    (Original post by XxKingSniprxX)
    I agree I hear the word "toned" by several people but everyone has a different perception of it, hence why I try not to use the word aswell.

    Sorry .. :lol:

    Yeah, exactly as everyone is different though the core principles remain the same for everyone.
    I like that sentence a lot

    I personally don't train 7 days a week at the moment, I'm still a novice lifter so issues with recovery don't affect me, but I'm upping the cardio so my training week looks like:

    Mon/Wed/Fri = Squats/Deads/Bench/Press/Chinup

    then Tues/Thurs/Sat will be abs, biceps, rear delts, lower back and cardio. I'm thinking of moving it all around though.
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    (Original post by MountKimbie)
    I like that sentence a lot

    I personally don't train 7 days a week at the moment, I'm still a novice lifter so issues with recovery don't affect me, but I'm upping the cardio so my training week looks like:

    Mon/Wed/Fri = Squats/Deads/Bench/Press/Chinup

    then Tues/Thurs/Sat will be abs, biceps, rear delts, lower back and cardio. I'm thinking of moving it all around though.
    What crucially matters the most is if you enjoy training as adherence is what will bring results.
    I train 5-6x week at the moment I.e Legs, Push, Pull, Rest day, Legs, Push, Pull.

    Push = chest, shoulders, triceps
    Pull = back, biceps etc.

    I hardly do cardio as much as I used to when I started out. Although cardio has its health benefits I see it as a tool to help being in a caloric deficit, which is contrary to my goal atm since I'm bulking. It will be a part of my schedule when I start cutting from July+

    How long have you been lifting? I'm curious as the word "novice" is relatively different for everyone. For example, I've been working out for 1 year and 7.5 months though I still perceive myself as a beginner in working out in comparison to people who have been working out for 6-8+ years.
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    (Original post by XxKingSniprxX)
    What crucially matters the most is if you enjoy training as adherence will bring results in the end.
    I train 5-6x week at the moment I.e Legs, Push, Pull, day off, Legs, Push, Pull.

    Push = chest, shoulders, triceps
    Pull = back, biceps etc.

    I hardly do cardio as much as I used to when I started out. Although cardio
    has its health benefits I see it as a tool to help being in a caloric deficit which is the opposite of my goal atm since I'm bulking. It will be a part of my schedule when I start cutting from July+

    How long have you been lifting for since the word "novice" is relatively different for everyone. For example, I've been working out for 1 year and 7.5 months though I still perceive myself as a beginner in working out in comparison to people who have been working out for 6-8+ years.
    A few months. I'm in my 4th week of training which is the longest I've ever consistently trained for. I keep stopping and starting so I don't really know.

    175kg deadlift for 2 reps.
    130kg squat for 1
    70kg bench for 1
    40kg OH press for 5x5.

    So still a novice.
    I have a lot of excess weight I'm trying to shed so i'm in a calorie deficit atm. I cannot wait to bulk. I want to get down to about 75 - 77kg.

    I'm aiming for a 180kg deadlift
    160kg squat
    80kg bench
    and 50kg OH press for 5

    Whilst still in this deficit. Noob strength gains

    I doubt the bench or press will happen without the eating.
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    I think it might be to do with genetics and diet. However, I do believe that a person get a good muscular body if he/she eats proper good food regularly.
    Im a type 1 diabetic, and have been lifting for over a year - most days.
    I always see elite muscular dudes in the weights area and they look flipping amazing. They've been doing it for years. I start to envy them alot, and I've been trying to get to a similar level for some time but still no luck yet. Still working on improving my diet, and eating more more more. I believe I hopefully will be able to get there even if I might have bad genes.
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    (Original post by MountKimbie)
    A few months. I'm in my 4th week of training which is the longest I've ever consistently trained for. I keep stopping and starting so I don't really know.

    175kg deadlift for 2 reps.
    130kg squat for 1
    70kg bench for 1
    40kg OH press for 5x5.

    So still a novice.
    I have a lot of excess weight I'm trying to shed so i'm in a calorie deficit atm. I cannot wait to bulk. I want to get down to about 75 - 77kg.

    I'm aiming for a 180kg deadlift
    160kg squat
    80kg bench
    and 50kg OH press for 5

    Whilst still in this deficit. Noob strength gains

    I doubt the bench or press will happen without the eating.
    If you're truly been lifting for that amount of time, I'd be amazed by what you can accomplish after 8-10 years. :laugh:
    I'm Mirin' your deadlift You're noob str gains are making me :drool: especially in 1 year time you'll be :dumbells:

    How much do you weigh atm? I don't go for 1 RM and generally work off my 5 rep range.

    I'm bulking up until 73.5kg (3lb/month) and then cutting back down to around roughly 8% body fat, which would be my first actual cut. I originally started out as 48kg at 5'9.5-5'10 hence why I don't compare myself to others and just compare myself to last week.

    69.2kg from last week average weigh in.

    Bench: 65x5.
    Squat: 85x5
    Deadlift: 112.5x5.
    OHP: 50x5.

    One key thing which I started doing quite a while back was tracking my lifts every workout in a journal book. It helps not only visualising long term results but also shows me that I can hit PRs every so often.
 
 
 
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