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    Engineering is everywhere....

    Almost everything you eat, wear, use and like to do involves engineering.

    From everyday things like your mobile, computer and clothes to medicine, space, national security and renewable energy.... to tackling climate change, providing clean drinking water or ensuring sustainable food supplies.

    What would you like to know about engineering? Ask us today!
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    does computer science count as engineering
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    (Original post by ajaxkiller)
    does computer science count as engineering
    No. Neither does computer engineering despite the name.
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    (Original post by ServantOfMorgoth)
    No. Neither does computer engineering despite the name.
    How is it different from engineering?


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    (Original post by Jimin's Jams)
    How is it different from engineering?


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    http://www.theatlantic.com/technolog...ineers/414271/

    Have a good read.
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    Should I do mechanical engineering or computer engineering?
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    (Original post by Blazyy)
    Should I do mechanical engineering or computer engineering?
    Well I do mechanical engineering so I may be a bit biased
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    Can you still pursue a career in an engineering if you do a degree in physics instead?
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    (Original post by Blazyy)
    Should I do mechanical engineering or computer engineering?
    Think about the type of role you can see yourself doing in the future and do your research. What are the entry requirements for these roles? Also, which gives you the most enjoyment? There's an old saying, 'Do what you love and success will follow'
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    (Original post by MathsAstronomy12)
    Can you still pursue a career in an engineering if you do a degree in physics instead?
    It really depends on what specialism within engineering you wish to pursue as it will vary a lot. There are so many nuances to engineering and a background in maths, physics or geography (for example) may really compliment some of these areas whilst others may require an engineering degree. Before you make any decisions regarding your degree, think about the type of role you can see yourself doing in the future and do your research. What are the entry requirements for these roles? Work that out and then go from there!
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    (Original post by MathsAstronomy12)
    Can you still pursue a career in an engineering if you do a degree in physics instead?
    Almost certainly, either through a grad scheme or direct application.
    Most companies aren't that bothered about your degree subject as long as it's a decent degree. I have a friend who did medical science working as an engineer.
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    (Original post by Donkey******)
    Almost certainly, either through a grad scheme or direct application.
    Most companies aren't that bothered about your degree subject as long as it's a decent degree. I have a friend who did medical science working as an engineer.
    What sort of "engineer" is this person working as? Medical science? Really?

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    (Original post by ServantOfMorgoth)
    What sort of "engineer" is this person working as? Medical science? Really?

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    He works in product creation/development in powertrain. Car industry.
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    (Original post by Donkey******)
    He works in product creation/development in powertrain. Car industry.
    Surely , they'd have a steep learning curve on that job. That's not for everyone.
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    (Original post by ServantOfMorgoth)
    Surely , they'd have a steep learning curve on that job. That's not for everyone.
    You still need your maths competencies for most science based subjects. That's all most engineering is, do the numbers fit the model.
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    (Original post by Donkey******)
    Almost certainly, either through a grad scheme or direct application.
    Most companies aren't that bothered about your degree subject as long as it's a decent degree. I have a friend who did medical science working as an engineer.
    Sweet!
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    The whole primes of that article seems to be based around the author whining that people who design computer chips or write software don't potentially endanger lives like someone who engineers a bridge does and as a result there is not a special set of professional qualification one needs to be classed as an engineer... So what?

    It's like saying that anyone who wants to practise science needs to be a member of some exclusive club lol. No they really don't. All that matters is their arguments and empirical findings not some stuffy professional hierarchy.

    My understanding of engineering has always been the application of knowledge gained from science and other rational fields of enquiry put to use to solve problems and create new technology. Whether that be building a bridge over a rive or designing a computer system for a particle accelerator. There is also often an overlap between science and engineering.

    A physicist who is attempting to build a computer chip out of a new material such as graphene is as much an engineer as someone building a bridge. It doesn't matter if he isn't a member of some society of engineers :faceplam:

    It makes sense that people who are in charge of designing and building bridges know what they are doing and have to get certain qualifications... But those qualifications and memberships are now what inherently make someone an engineer.

    Ultimatum it is just semantics. I don;t care who does it or how we get there. New scientific discoveries, development of new technologies and solving of problems are all a good thing.
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    (Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
    The whole primes of that article seems to be based around the author whining that people who design computer chips or write software don't potentially endanger lives like someone who engineers a bridge does and as a result there is not a special set of professional qualification one needs to be classed as an engineer... So what?

    It's like saying that anyone who wants to practise science needs to be a member of some exclusive club lol. No they really don't. All that matters is their arguments and empirical findings not some stuffy professional hierarchy.

    My understanding of engineering has always been the application of knowledge gained from science and other rational fields of enquiry put to use to solve problems and create new technology. Whether that be building a bridge over a rive or designing a computer system for a particle accelerator. There is also often an overlap between science and engineering.

    A physicist who is attempting to build a computer chip out of a new material such as graphene is as much an engineer as someone building a bridge. It doesn't matter if he isn't a member of some society of engineers :faceplam:

    It makes sense that people who are in charge of designing and building bridges know what they are doing and have to get certain qualifications... But those qualifications and memberships are now what inherently make someone an engineer.

    Ultimatum it is just semantics. I don;t care who does it or how we get there. New scientific discoveries, development of new technologies and solving of problems are all a good thing.
    This is rich coming from someone that hasn't done any engineering at all. If you don't know what you're talking about... Dont say anything.
    Would you hire law school graduate to advise you on a charge against you? No? Why? Because they need to pass the bar to be a lawyer. It proves their competence. Its the same way the engineering chartered status is looked at.

    You know what that means? It means not because you can "run numbers" to fit equations, it means you have any idea of being a competent engineer so no, its not just some "club".

    Engineering has so much more things different from pure science a physicist wouldn't be as compentent otherwise the saying would be " all physicists are engineers but not all engineers are physicists"
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    (Original post by Donkey******)
    You still need your maths competencies for most science based subjects. That's all most engineering is, do the numbers fit the model.
    No, its not. It's laiden with assumptions and estimations that someone without experience in engineering would not know what assumptions or estimations to make.
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    (Original post by ServantOfMorgoth)
    This is rich coming from someone that hasn't done any engineering at all. If you don't know what you're talking about... Dont say anything.
    You don't have to have done engineering to know what engineering is in the same way you don't need to be scientist to know what science is. It could be that I am coming from a science background that may be a lot less rigid than an engineering background. I was specially taught that there is no high authority that decides what is correct or not in science.

    I never said the "clubs" were a bad thing. I want bridges to be safe. It can be a good way of knowing if someone is experienced and in the case of Civil Engineering they is a very good reason to regulate who can build them to make sure the buildings, roads and bridges we use are not going to break and kill people. I'm just saying that the clubs are not essential for someone to engineer something or to be classed as an engineer.

    You just acknowledged there are different fields of physics. Pure physics isn't engineering sure. However Applied physics overlaps with engineering very much so. If your research is based on the physics of how graphene behaves at extreme temperatures and pressures then that is pure science. You are doing it for it's own sake (although it can be motivated by the potential practical uses that could come out of your research). But if you are a physicist involved in the research and development of little graphene electrodes that can be placed in the brain to treat motor neuron diseases then they are in the field of nano and bioengineering. You can get into that kind of field just by doing a science phd or even just from a graduate base line if you worked your way up though a biotech company to something. All that matter is you somehow prove you are knowledgeable and skilled in your area. You don;t need to be a charted engineer or anything like that.

    Ultimately I don't care what you call it. You can keep your stupid engineering badge/snob factor. If someone engineers a solution that cures people of parkinson's disease I care more about the achievement than what we call the people who made it happen. Same with those who build bridges.

    "Applied physics is physics which is intended for a particular technological or practical use.[1] It is usually considered as a bridge or a connection between physics and engineering" ~ Wiki


    "Basic research, also called pure research or fundamental research, is scientific research aimed to improve scientific theories for improved understanding or prediction of natural or other phenomena.[1] Applied research, in turn, uses scientific theories to develop technology or techniques to intervene and alter natural or other phenomena. Though often driven by curiosity,[2]basic research fuels applied science's innovations.[3] The two aims are often coordinated in research and development."

    It's not like I am in the minority here of what counts as engineering anyway. You are.

    I'm a Bachelor of Science in Physics from a uni that does a lot of Applied Physics so I think I have more bits of paper than you when it comes to physics and the different schools within it and how they relate to engineering.
 
 
 
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