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Could I get an Aspergers Diagnosis at Uni? Watch

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    Do Universities have facilities or personnel who could diagnose Aspergers?
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    Unlikely. Have you spoke to your GP?
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    Universities usually have a surgery associated with them. Your GP there would probably have to refer you to a specialist to get an actual diagnosis.
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    Unlikely. Have you spoke to your GP?
    I am worried my GP might reject my concerns, because the symptons are invisible.
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    (Original post by YaliaV)
    Universities usually have a surgery associated with them. Your GP there would probably have to refer you to a specialist to get an actual diagnosis.
    Thanks for the information.
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    (Original post by topicoa)
    I am worried my GP might reject my concerns, because the symptons are invisible.
    They won't. They've heard it all before.
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    My experiences with my GP weren't great (NHS). They sent me to an occupational therapist who, after seeing me for five minutes, told me I had social anxiety and gave me a booklet about it. Eventually, after an appointment with the same therapist, a psychologist spoke to me for no longer than five minutes and told me that I didn't have Asperger's and that, in any case, the waiting list for assessments had been closed. The NHS were absolutely useless in my experience, although it may be different in England (I've found almost everything to be more efficient than at home!). One of my friends spent two years on a waiting list, and that was before she turned 18 (I think that means she was prioritised but I'm not sure).

    Eventually I decided to go private, only because I had two months to go before starting university, and was told that there was "no question" that I was on the spectrum (which, naturally, I was really happy about).

    I think you would be best contacting your university's disability service directly (I would probably email too so there is a record of you contacting them) to ask what diagnostic support is available. My university has a fund for assessments for dyslexia (not sure if ASD too) so you can't be sure until you ask directly.

    Good luck!!!
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    (Original post by OreganoLightbulb)
    My experiences with my GP weren't great (NHS). They sent me to an occupational therapist who, after seeing me for five minutes, told me I had social anxiety and gave me a booklet about it. Eventually, after an appointment with the same therapist, a psychologist spoke to me for no longer than five minutes and told me that I didn't have Asperger's and that, in any case, the waiting list for assessments had been closed. The NHS were absolutely useless in my experience, although it may be different in England (I've found almost everything to be more efficient than at home!). One of my friends spent two years on a waiting list, and that was before she turned 18 (I think that means she was prioritised but I'm not sure).

    Eventually I decided to go private, only because I had two months to go before starting university, and was told that there was "no question" that I was on the spectrum (which, naturally, I was really happy about).

    I think you would be best contacting your university's disability service directly (I would probably email too so there is a record of you contacting them) to ask what diagnostic support is available. My university has a fund for assessments for dyslexia (not sure if ASD too) so you can't be sure until you ask directly.

    Good luck!!!
    Thank you for sharing your personal experience and apologies for my late reply. I hope you are getting the support you need.
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    (Original post by topicoa)
    Do Universities have facilities or personnel who could diagnose Aspergers?
    No, Universities cannot offer such a diagnosis. The only way is to get a referral to a specialist from your GP or via privately.

    Source: My sister got a dyslexia diagnosis privately
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    They won't. They've heard it all before.
    They most likely will. Getting diagnosed with autism in adulthood is not something the NHS will be too happy to do as it suggests that they and the education system completely failed to spot the signs when he/she was a child.
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    (Original post by hannah097)
    They most likely will. Getting diagnosed with autism in adulthood is not something the NHS will be too happy to do as it suggests that they and the education system completely failed to spot the signs when he/she was a child.
    I should know. My GP did refer me when I was an adult.
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    (Original post by hannah097)
    They most likely will. Getting diagnosed with autism in adulthood is not something the NHS will be too happy to do as it suggests that they and the education system completely failed to spot the signs when he/she was a child.
    My sister's going through the process right now at the age of 22. She was offered CBT at first for depression but when that didn't work and she went back she was referred to a psychologist for assessment. The psychologist referred her for an autism assessment and during the two year (!) wait she has (I know it's even longer for children) she's being supported by a social worker and our mum and I are getting help from carers services because we've been trying to support her alone all along.

    A GP can only refer you to the mental health team, it's then that you have to go through an assessment and referrals to get the diagnosis. They can't really just push you aside and ignore you if you persist in saying that there's something wrong and it's been wrong since you were young. I know that the NHS often try (I've been referred for CBT way too many times, and it never works for me) but they have to listen eventually.
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    (Original post by mscaffrey)
    My sister's going through the process right now at the age of 22. She was offered CBT at first for depression but when that didn't work and she went back she was referred to a psychologist for assessment. The psychologist referred her for an autism assessment and during the two year (!) wait she has (I know it's even longer for children) she's being supported by a social worker and our mum and I are getting help from carers services because we've been trying to support her alone all along.

    A GP can only refer you to the mental health team, it's then that you have to go through an assessment and referrals to get the diagnosis. They can't really just push you aside and ignore you if you persist in saying that there's something wrong and it's been wrong since you were young. I know that the NHS often try (I've been referred for CBT way too many times, and it never works for me) but they have to listen eventually.
    They offered me CBT the day after I came out of the hospital after taking a massive overdose, six bog standard sessions of course. It must be poundland kind of cheap.
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    (Original post by hannah097)
    They offered me CBT the day after I came out of the hospital after taking a massive overdose, six bog standard sessions of course. It must be poundland kind of cheap.
    Yeah, I've been suffering with agoraphobia since 2008 and I must have been referred for CBT 3 or 4 times. Always 6 sessions. Never really tailored to your situation. I had an awful experience with one of the therapists who didn't seem to be trained in anything psychological apart from CBT (probably how the NHS cut their mental health costs). So many people have been damaged by CBT, or at least not helped, and I don't understand why the NHS continue to spend their money on something which is a waste of time for lots of people. Maybe offer it in some cases, but don't offer it to severe cases and don't offer it to people who it has failed for. I changed my GP and told him how I'd had trouble with CBT and he said that he heard a lot of people saying that and he didn't really believe in it the therapy. :rolleyes: All the mental health team said was that CBT is the therapy for anxiety. But I say that if the treatment for cancer doesn't work doctors don't keep forcing it on a patient saying it should be working - they look for another treatment option.

    After a lot of persistence I've finally been referred to a psychologist but I've ended up mostly improving my own situation through self-help.
 
 
 
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