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Is it too late to apply to Unis? watch

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    I originally intended to start an access course in September for computer science, or science, but I have changed my mind about the subject I want to do because I can't really see myself doing either of those subjects for 3 or 3+ years, I also don't want to wait such a long time to go to uni. So my new plan is to apply to do an English degree with a foundation year, is it too late for me though? Please don't tell me how English graduates don't get jobs, I'm really not here to be told that, I would just really like to know if it's too late for me to apply to universities to start this September, is it realistic? Would I still be able to apply for loans or am I too late?
    I'm 20, and I honestly don't have many qualifications except for one decent grade in GCSE English, is it likely that any universities will accept me on a foundation degree without many qualifications or much experience? What do I talk about in my personal statement?
    Many thanks
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    (Original post by A.m.y)
    I originally intended to start an access course in September for computer science, or science, but I have changed my mind about the subject I want to do because I can't really see myself doing either of those subjects for 3 or 3+ years, I also don't want to wait such a long time to go to uni. So my new plan is to apply to do an English degree with a foundation year, is it too late for me though? Please don't tell me how English graduates don't get jobs, I'm really not here to be told that, I would just really like to know if it's too late for me to apply to universities to start this September, is it realistic? Would I still be able to apply for loans or am I too late?
    I'm 20, and I honestly don't have many qualifications except for one decent grade in GCSE English, is it likely that any universities will accept me on a foundation degree without many qualifications or much experience? What do I talk about in my personal statement?
    Many thanks
    Assuming the universities still have space yes you can apply this year. You ve got till May to sort out student finance so plenty of time.
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    Am I likely to get onto any courses with no qualifications, and possibly a badly written personal statement?
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    (Original post by A.m.y)
    Am I likely to get onto any courses with no qualifications, and possibly a badly written personal statement?
    Do you have no level 3 quals at all? If so it's much less likely.
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    None at all is it unlikely even if it's a foundation course?
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    (Original post by A.m.y)
    None at all is it unlikely even if it's a foundation course?
    Not going to happen this year, I'm afraid. English is hugely competitive, but in any case you are going to need level 3 qualifications to get in. Decide what you really want to do and accept that you will have to spend at least next year doing the exams you're going to need to get in. You're going to need GCSEs in maths and a couple of other subjects on top of your English, so you need to decide what you are going to do about this. I'm afraid it's not going to happen all in a rush, so take your time and plan your best route to getting where you want to be.
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    Firstly - have you really thought about what you want to do? Computer Science and English seem very different. If you're going to commit 3 or 4 years to a degree, make sure you've thought about it. Even if it means waiting a year to make sure you're doing what you want to. A year isn't a lot at your age, honest, and you could use it to a. decide what you really want and b. get any qualifications you might need, or that would help
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    (Original post by Carnationlilyrose)
    Not going to happen this year, I'm afraid. English is hugely competitive, but in any case you are going to need level 3 qualifications to get in. Decide what you really want to do and accept that you will have to spend at least next year doing the exams you're going to need to get in. You're going to need GCSEs in maths and a couple of other subjects on top of your English, so you need to decide what you are going to do about this. I'm afraid it's not going to happen all in a rush, so take your time and plan your best route to getting where you want to be.
    Okay thanks you're right, it seems like the best thing to do. I just didn't want to have to wait another year.
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    (Original post by cheshiremum)
    Firstly - have you really thought about what you want to do? Computer Science and English seem very different. If you're going to commit 3 or 4 years to a degree, make sure you've thought about it. Even if it means waiting a year to make sure you're doing what you want to. A year isn't a lot at your age, honest, and you could use it to a. decide what you really want and b. get any qualifications you might need, or that would help
    Well I wanted to do computer science because job prospects after graduation are good for people in that field, then I wanted to do science because I genuinely enjoy it at times, but can't see myself sitting in lectures studying it for 3 years. Then I wanted to do English because it's the only thing I'm decent at, and feel like I could do well in, and keep up with for 3 or 4 years. But thanks for your advice, though it burns me that I have to wait another year to go to Uni, it is probably best not to rush.
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    Do some research though - here's one place that doesn't necessarily require formal qualifications for their English lit degree: http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/dll/cours...s/applications
    You'd need to convince them of your passion for the subject of course.
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    (Original post by cheshiremum)
    Do some research though - here's one place that doesn't necessarily require formal qualifications for their English lit degree: http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/dll/cours...s/applications
    You'd need to convince them of your passion for the subject of course.
    Thank for this, I will look more into it
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    You seem quite worried about job prospects for English graduates... Firstly, 70% of graduate jobs accept people with a degree in any subject, so there will be lots of opportunities out there for you.

    Secondly, have you come across the website www.unistats.ac.UK ? It allows you to compare official employment stats for every course at every uni in the UK, which is pretty nifty.

    In terms of subject choice, pick something you enjoy. There's no point doing a subject for the perceived job prospects if all it does is get you into a job you don't enjoy. Why make yourself miserable for the next 50 years?

    I think an Access course would be better for you - not only is it tailored for mature students without qualifications (like you!) but it will work out cheaper and you'll get to delay making your final degree subject choice for a year.

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    (Original post by Origami Bullets)
    You seem quite worried about job prospects for English graduates... Firstly, 70% of graduate jobs accept people with a degree in any subject, so there will be lots of opportunities out there for you.

    Secondly, have you come across the website www.unistats.ac.UK ? It allows you to compare official employment stats for every course at every uni in the UK, which is pretty nifty.

    In terms of subject choice, pick something you enjoy. There's no point doing a subject for the perceived job prospects if all it does is get you into a job you don't enjoy. Why make yourself miserable for the next 50 years?

    I think an Access course would be better for you - not only is it tailored for mature students without qualifications (like you!) but it will work out cheaper and you'll get to delay making your final degree subject choice for a year.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Thanks for the insight. I've decided that I may just do an access course, or find some kind of work experience so that I can really think about what I want to do instead of, like you said, being stuck in a career I hate for the next 50 years.
 
 
 
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