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    (Original post by QuibblerWaffle)
    No need to apologize, I'm happy to receive any feedback I can get. I think taking 5 A-levels is a big risk and challenge and maybe taking it on wouldn't be the ideal choice. I'll keep in mind a back-up plan, I've known people that have changed their ambitions of becoming doctors to becoming politicians
    Thank you:jumphug:
    It is a risk, and you could apply for all of those subjects, and see how you cope. You will be able to drop subjects before the end of the academic year if you took that amount, and you are usually given two weeks to swap courses, etc. This is good, but with swapping courses, it can be difficult, as only a few spaces will be remaining on courses, and you might not get the one you want. So, it is definitely best to decide on subjects beforehand, and then consider dropping if required, instead of changing. That is always an option, and you should discuss this with the college you want to apply to.
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    You should check which exam boards you're doing as some are 2 year courses and some have AS levels. If philosophy is a 2 year course it's a waste of time as you'll get no qualification due to the fact you're not doing an AS in it

    Hope this helps
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    Well 4 is deffo needed for chem eng at Imperial or Cambridge. Everyone I know who got offers from Cambrige and Imperial have had 4 A-levels, would be difficult to get an offer with just 3. 5 A-levels is a waste of time though, the universities wont care
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    (Original post by QuibblerWaffle)
    (...) When I first made the decision I was thrilled and excited to get GCSE's over and done with but now I feel like I've made the wrong choice and possibly underestimated a-levels? (...)
    Have had the same feeling when I have choosen Latin as a foreign language instead of French. But bear up and bring it to an end!

    (Original post by Xenon17)
    Bro are u stupid or something my mates doing 9 I'm doing 7, 5 alevels is nothing
    Same here. Have had 9 A-levels, was examined in 8 of them.
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    (Original post by Daniel9998)
    Well 4 is deffo needed for chem eng at Imperial or Cambridge. Everyone I know who got offers from Cambrige and Imperial have had 4 A-levels, would be difficult to get an offer with just 3. 5 A-levels is a waste of time though, the universities wont care
    Only time I've seen someone do 5 was where a guy had already done history AS at GCSE so finished the A2 in year 12. Continued the other 4 with an EPQ.
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    I'm currently doing 5 AS levels (maths, further, bio, chem and physics) and although it's not necessary by anyone's standards it is certainly achievable, especially if your college is going to support you with it. Good luck if you choose to take up all five
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    (Original post by unprinted)

    Chemistry is the most difficult one you've got there, but you want to do a chemistry-related degree...
    I guess it varies from person to person - I find it the easiest of my subjects!
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    If you do choose to do 5 then good luck because a levels are getting a lot harder in general. You might get the grades but you will have no social life which can be ok to some people but socialisation/commmunication skills are vital for any profession, it's not always about how much you know.
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    Hypothetical scenario What if... You apply to say Cambridge for instance and they say that you need an A* in your weakest subject? What would you do then?
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    (Original post by Thomb)
    Hypothetical scenario What if... You apply to say Cambridge for instance and they say that you need an A* in your weakest subject? What would you do then?
    Hypothetically, I'd be screwed. I would honestly just end up applying to a different Uni, it's not all about Cambridge for me, it's just an extremely ambitious target:smartass:.
    If I was to take 5 A-levels I would have already noticed which subjects I was struggling with before AS exam season and obviously dropped it if it wasn't compulsory/required for Chemical Engineering e.g. Philosophy
    Let's just hope I don't end up find something like maths really difficult otherwise that would be a complete disaster:erm:
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    (Original post by QuibblerWaffle)
    Hypothetically, I'd be screwed. I would honestly just end up applying to a different Uni, it's not all about Cambridge for me, it's just an extremely ambitious target:smartass:.
    If I was to take 5 A-levels I would have already noticed which subjects I was struggling with before AS exam season and obviously dropped it if it wasn't compulsory/required for Chemical Engineering e.g. Philosophy
    Let's just hope I don't end up find something like maths really difficult otherwise that would be a complete disaster:erm:

    Oh you're going to drop one when you finish AS, I thought you were going to do all five to and including A level. I suppose it depends on whether or not you find the step up from GCSE greater than you anticipated or not. Can you try out the subjects at home before you start or do you have too much going on like GCSEs?
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    (Original post by Thomb)
    Oh you're going to drop one when you finish AS, I thought you were going to do all five to and including A level. I suppose it depends on whether or not you find the step up from GCSE greater than you anticipated or not. Can you try out the subjects at home before you start or do you have too much going on like GCSEs?
    I guess I could start looking over very briefly what each subject would contain but I'll probably give myself a head start when the summer holidays begin
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    (Original post by QuibblerWaffle)
    I guess I could start looking over very briefly what each subject would contain but I'll probably give myself a head start when the summer holidays begin

    I would look at it to see if you like that sort of thing at least with philosophy anyway. The amount of people on TSR who take philosophy and psychology in particular and then find its nothing like they thought it would be is unreal.
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    Don't do 5 please.
    It is so unnecessary are requires way too much effort.
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    (Original post by Thomb)
    I would look at it to see if you like that sort of thing at least with philosophy anyway. The amount of people on TSR who take philosophy and psychology in particular and then find its nothing like they thought it would be is unreal.
    (Original post by QuibblerWaffle)
    I guess I could start looking over very briefly what each subject would contain but I'll probably give myself a head start when the summer holidays begin
    A good start would be to read Sophie's World. It's a novel which offers a gentle introduction to philosophical ideas. Can be done as light reading but tbh I wouldn't advise reading it just before bed. It kept me up with questions. Rather good first introduction to the ideas.

    After that, The Great Conversation is a fantastic book. You can read Russell's History of Philosophy if you like but I prefer the former. The idea is that you should do a run-through of how philosophical ideas have changed throughout history. Without understanding the 'run-through' and what philosophers have said before each other, it's a struggle to understand what philosophers meant to say, since a lot of the time their ideas work on the ideas of those before them.

    From there, you can study basically anything you want - A particular philosopher or time or topic - and have the general grasp to go deeper. I like Stanford's Encyclopaedia of Philosophy when particular topics are of interest. By far the best free resource on the web.

    Like Thomb hints at, I find reading philosophy and thinking about it in my spare time and being forced to write philosophical arguments very different. The former is fulfilling and the later a task in pedantic semantics. But when we did an Oxford Insight Day at my school, I found the lecture and essays very interesting compared to what our A level philosophy department offered which was incredibly facile and boring in comparison.
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    (Original post by Mathstatician)
    A good start would be to read Sophie's World. It's a novel which offers a gentle introduction to philosophical ideas. Can be done as light reading but tbh I wouldn't advise reading it just before bed. It kept me up with questions. Rather good first introduction to the ideas.

    After that, The Great Conversation is a fantastic book. You can read Russell's History of Philosophy if you like but I prefer the former. The idea is that you should do a run-through of how philosophical ideas have changed throughout history. Without understanding the 'run-through' and what philosophers have said before each other, it's a struggle to understand what philosophers meant to say, since a lot of the time their ideas work on the ideas of those before them.

    From there, you can study basically anything you want - A particular philosopher or time or topic - and have the general grasp to go deeper. I like Stanford's Encyclopaedia of Philosophy when particular topics are of interest. By far the best free resource on the web.

    I find reading philosophy and thinking about it in my spare time and being forced to write philosophical arguments very different. The former is fulfilling and the later a task in pedantic semantics. But when we did an Oxford Insight Day at my school, I found the lecture and essays very interesting compared to what our A level philosophy department offered which was incredibly facile in comparison.

    I've read both those books and I highly recommend them as well. Sophie's World is a brilliant story and Bertrand Russell is a genius.
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    (Original post by Thomb)
    I've read both those books and I highly recommend them as well. Sophie's World is a brilliant story and Bertrand Russell is a genius.
    (Original post by Mathstatician)
    A good start would be to read Sophie's World. It's a novel which offers a gentle introduction to philosophical ideas. Can be done as light reading but tbh I wouldn't advise reading it just before bed. It kept me up with questions. Rather good first introduction to the ideas.

    After that, The Great Conversation is a fantastic book. You can read Russell's History of Philosophy if you like but I prefer the former. The idea is that you should do a run-through of how philosophical ideas have changed throughout history. Without understanding the 'run-through' and what philosophers have said before each other, it's a struggle to understand what philosophers meant to say, since a lot of the time their ideas work on the ideas of those before them.

    From there, you can study basically anything you want - A particular philosopher or time or topic - and have the general grasp to go deeper. I like Stanford's Encyclopaedia of Philosophy when particular topics are of interest. By far the best free resource on the web.

    Like Thomb hints at, I find reading philosophy and thinking about it in my spare time and being forced to write philosophical arguments very different. The former is fulfilling and the later a task in pedantic semantics. But when we did an Oxford Insight Day at my school, I found the lecture and essays very interesting compared to what our A level philosophy department offered which was incredibly facile and boring in comparison.
    Thank you for the recommendations, I'm on amazon right now about to order some of those books
    I might even start doing some research into Bertrand Russell, he seems like a very respected Philosopher as well as other things
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    (Original post by loveleest)
    Don't do 5 please.
    It is so unnecessary are requires way too much effort.
    Yeah, I now feel as though the cons of taking 5 A-levels outweigh the pros
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    (Original post by QuibblerWaffle)
    Thank you for the recommendations, I'm on amazon right now about to order some of those books
    I might even start doing some research into Bertrand Russell, he seems like a very respected Philosopher as well as other things
    He was as I said a genius he was the stephen hawkins of his time except he was a philosopher and maths genius in his Principae Mathematica he spent about 100 pages explaining why 2+2=4. Genius.
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    (Original post by QuibblerWaffle)
    Hey

    I've chosen my A level subjects and was thinking of taking the following:
    Maths
    Chemistry
    Physics
    Further maths
    Philosophy
    I might end up doing an EPQ in Computer Science

    I am an aspiring Chemical Engineer and have high hopes for myself to study at either Cambridge or Imperial:awesome:
    I will be dropping further maths and philosophy at A2.

    Is the workload of 5 AS subjects too much to cope with?
    Will I have a lot of free periods, if any at all?
    Will I have time for a social life?

    I understand there's this whole concept of "it's better to achieve 4A's than 2A's and 3B's" but I know I can do well. I plan on going over briefly all of my subjects during the summer holidays and doing revision regularly (not just because I'll have to but genuinely because I really like learning). When I first made the decision I was thrilled and excited to get GCSE's over and done with but now I feel like I've made the wrong choice and possibly underestimated a-levels? It'd be great to hear some stories of how well people have coped/coping with 5 a-levels or with any of the subjects I've chosen above.

    Thanks in advance :cute:
    We both have similar ambitions. I'd also like to go into Chemical Engineering and my chosen subjects are Maths, Chemistry, Physics and Further Maths. I've read upon the requirements for different universities and almost all require AS Further Maths (they only ever say it's not compulsory when they are aware that not all sixth forms/colleges offer this A-level). Like it's been said above, learn Philosophy in your own time - Maybe you could do it as an EPQ? That way you don't have to bother with the stress of the extra exams. Ditch Philosophy and stick with the other options, you don't want to be put at a disadvantage when it comes to applying to Uni's for Chemical Engineering
 
 
 
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