Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Hello!

    I'm trying to optimise my choices around courses I might find interesting at university. I wonder whether those who've gone and/or have gone through the process might advise me on whether my thought process makes sense here, since the school's careers advisor hasn't been much help-- "What about a BTEC in science?" :facepalm:

    Having looked at prospectuses and course descriptions, and based on what I've read in my spare time and/or have enjoyed at school, my current considerations are: Maths, computer science, economics, management, philosophy, physics and medicine * in current order of preference before A Levels.

    In doing so, I would also like to make sure to limit my ASs to 4 subjects, planning carry 3 onto A2, per convention-- not interested in undue stress.

    So given the more mathematically inclined subjects need and/or desire both maths and further maths, it seems like a necessity that I study these, leaving 2 more options.

    After this, it seems I have a few options: Computer Science, Economics, Philosophy, Physics or even something like Chemistry if I'd like like to keep the medical door open*.

    Since Economics, CS and philosophy aren't required for their respective degrees, and physics is required for a physics degree, it also seems prudent to study that.
    Beyond this, I could probably study chemistry and even keep the medicine option open.

    In sum my choices would be maths, further maths, chemistry, physics, expecting to 'drop' either chemistry or further maths depending on whether I choose medicine or maths based topic, with programming and economics and philosophy reading in spare time. Would you say this is reasonable?

    Any advise would be appreciated. Guess I feel like this is my first 'big' decision on my own so want to make the correct call. Feedback would help settle me.

    *Something medics seem very reluctant to advise doing, though I wonder whether their lack of enthusiasm and burning out is really reflective of the profession relative to others or just a case of the grumps that most workers feel at their jobs. For this reason, I've put it as low priority for now, because if preparing for medicine would inhibit my ability to remain eligible for other subjects, I will rule that out first. Otherwise, I'm happy to wait for medical work experience/shadowing to help guide me a little better.
    • Section Leader
    • Very Important Poster
    • Peer Support Volunteers
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    Very Important Poster
    Peer Support Volunteers
    (Original post by Mathstatician)
    Hello!

    I'm trying to optimise my choices around courses I might find interesting at university. I wonder whether those who've gone and/or have gone through the process might advise me on whether my thought process makes sense here, since the school's careers advisor hasn't been much help-- "What about a BTEC in science?" :facepalm:

    Having looked at prospectuses and course descriptions, and based on what I've read in my spare time and/or have enjoyed at school, my current considerations are: Maths, computer science, economics, management, philosophy, physics and medicine * in current order of preference before A Levels.

    In doing so, I would also like to make sure to limit my ASs to 4 subjects, planning carry 3 onto A2, per convention-- not interested in undue stress.

    So given the more mathematically inclined subjects need and/or desire both maths and further maths, it seems like a necessity that I study these, leaving 2 more options.

    After this, it seems I have a few options: Computer Science, Economics, Philosophy, Physics or even something like Chemistry if I'd like like to keep the medical door open*.

    Since Economics, CS and philosophy aren't required for their respective degrees, and physics is required for a physics degree, it also seems prudent to study that.
    Beyond this, I could probably study chemistry and even keep the medicine option open.

    In sum my choices would be maths, further maths, chemistry, physics, expecting to 'drop' either chemistry or further maths depending on whether I choose medicine or maths based topic, with programming and economics and philosophy reading in spare time. Would you say this is reasonable?

    Any advise would be appreciated. Guess I feel like this is my first 'big' decision on my own so want to make the correct call. Feedback would help settle me.

    *Something medics seem very reluctant to advise doing, though I wonder whether their lack of enthusiasm and burning out is really reflective of the profession relative to others or just a case of the grumps that most workers feel at their jobs. For this reason, I've put it as low priority for now, because if preparing for medicine would inhibit my ability to remain eligible for other subjects, I will rule that out first. Otherwise, I'm happy to wait for medical work experience/shadowing to help guide me a little better.
    I would say reasonable choices for most of your chosen degrees, except many medical schools could require biology.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by claireestelle)
    I would say reasonable choices for most of your chosen degrees, except many medical schools could require biology.
    Yeah. This is the sticking point for me. Some need chemistry and one or two other sciences, though, right? Suppose I need to look at those and whether it's feasible that I can get away without biology.
    • Section Leader
    • Very Important Poster
    • Peer Support Volunteers
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    Very Important Poster
    Peer Support Volunteers
    (Original post by Mathstatician)
    Yeah. This is the sticking point for me. Some need chemistry and one or two other sciences, though, right? Suppose I need to look at those and whether it's feasible that I can get away without biology.
    This should help
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/cont...el-requirement
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Ah, that's great.

    After a quick glance, I see Bristol, Oxbridge, Edinburgh, Manchester, Sheffield...Seems as though if I'm to do this without a medical foundation year it'll be top institutions I'm applying for with chemistry and one/two other sciences, but since the grades needed for medicine are about equal anyway I'm not sure it makes that much difference.

    I think I'm feeling a little better about this after seeing this so thank you very much for your help
    • Section Leader
    • Very Important Poster
    • Peer Support Volunteers
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    Very Important Poster
    Peer Support Volunteers
    (Original post by Mathstatician)
    Ah, that's great.

    After a quick glance, I see Bristol, Oxbridge, Edinburgh, Manchester, Sheffield...Seems as though if I'm to do this without a medical foundation year it'll be top institutions I'm applying for with chemistry and one/two other sciences, but since the grades needed for medicine are about equal anyway I'm not sure it makes that much difference.

    I think I'm feeling a little better about this after seeing this so thank you very much for your help
    Glad to help
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by claireestelle)
    Glad to help
    Now to actually do the work required to achieve all of this brilliant yet absolutely hypothetical plan :erm: Any chance you could help there too

    :lol:
    • Section Leader
    • Very Important Poster
    • Peer Support Volunteers
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    Very Important Poster
    Peer Support Volunteers
    (Original post by Mathstatician)
    Now to actually do the work required to achieve all of this brilliant yet absolutely hypothetical plan :erm: Any chance you could help there too

    :lol:
    It's good you've got such a solid plan though
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I'm having second thoughts and considering maths, further maths, chemistry and biology to keep my options open more sensibly for medicine and other healthcare. It means crossing out physics and engineering though which I might be okay with.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Healthcare, maths, tech, finance.

    artificial intelligence. game theory. pathology. neurophysiology. machine learning.

    all things I'm interested in.

    None of which is physics.
    • Section Leader
    • Very Important Poster
    • Peer Support Volunteers
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    Very Important Poster
    Peer Support Volunteers
    (Original post by Mathstatician)
    I'm having second thoughts and considering maths, further maths, chemistry and biology to keep my options open more sensibly for medicine and other healthcare. It means crossing out physics and engineering though which I might be okay with.
    You wouldn't lose every kind of engineering there's chemical and biomedical still open to you so you would be keeping a lot open to you still.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by claireestelle)
    You wouldn't lose every kind of engineering there's chemical and biomedical still open to you so you would be keeping a lot open to you still.
    You're extremely helpful, clairestelle. I hope you know you're appreciated.
    • Section Leader
    • Very Important Poster
    • Peer Support Volunteers
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    Very Important Poster
    Peer Support Volunteers
    (Original post by Mathstatician)
    You're extremely helpful, clairestelle. I hope you know you're appreciated.
    Thank you
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I'm currently researching biomedical engineering and it seems they require physics in most instances.

    I keep more options open with physics than biology, it looks like, especially if I just focus maths or computer science or engineering with healthcare solutions. This may be the key.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Option 3: Study 5 ASs.
    Cons: Probably a part time job will be too much on top of this; High risk of overloading; medicine and other healthcare courses offer a foundation year if I really need to go about it that way (though so do engineering).
    Pros: Not risking an extra year of study. Broad experience over each subject meaning a real idea of which I prefer and have aptitude for. Impressive (weak reason - assumes high grades).
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Watching a physics documentary today inspired my enthusiasm for the subject again after a pretty bland GCSE experience. I think I can do without biology. It's really a tight call but, given biology seems to rely mostly on memorisation and physics on learning principles, I'm happy to make my final call of M, FM, C, P with coding done on the side-- I've never been keen on just accumulating facts. I think at this point my primary focus will be on the 'hard' sciences and if I really can't shake the bug then bite the bullet and go for graduate entry medicine, understanding it's much more competitive. I'll probably be at an advantage having not been a 'failed' medic at a level, though I'm not completely sure it's much of an advantage really.

    College interview on the 28th!
 
 
 
Poll
Should predicted grades be removed from the uni application process
Help with your A-levels

All the essentials

The adventure begins mug

Student life: what to expect

What it's really like going to uni

Rosette

Essay expert

Learn to write like a pro with our ultimate essay guide.

Uni match

Uni match

Our tool will help you find the perfect course for you

Study planner

Create a study plan

Get your head around what you need to do and when with the study planner tool.

Study planner

Resources by subject

Everything from mind maps to class notes.

Hands typing

Degrees without fees

Discover more about degree-level apprenticeships.

A student doing homework

Study tips from A* students

Students who got top grades in their A-levels share their secrets

Study help links and info

Can you help? Study help unanswered threadsRules and posting guidelines

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.