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Water is weird watch

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    Water has London forces, dipole -dipole interactions and hydrogen bonding, why isn't it a solid? Because with all of these intermolecular forces shouldn't it be really hard for it to be in liquid form because you have to break some of the intermolecular forces at high energy because of how stable the molecule is together so the atoms are more moveable?
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    Sigh.....Im too tired to explain so direct you to google.
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    (Original post by GettingitDone)
    Sigh.....Im too tired to explain so direct you to google.
    Thanks for that! Surely typing it here was less effort! I didn't get it that's why I came here 😑
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    why is water wet?
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    (Original post by sleepysnooze)
    why is water wet?
    I feel like I should know this but I don't 😭😭
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    (Original post by Alisahhh1998)
    I feel like I should know this but I don't 😭😭
    why is fire hot? why is ice cold? so many mysteries of reality
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    (Original post by sleepysnooze)
    why is fire hot? why is ice cold? so many mysteries of reality
    Oh that wasn't you being helpful, just useless.
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    water is found in a liquid state. This is because of the tiny, weak hydrogen bonds which, in their billions, hold water molecules together for small fractions of a second. Water molecules are constantly on the move.
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    (Original post by Ishea16)
    water is found in a liquid state. This is because of the tiny, weak hydrogen bonds which, in their billions, hold water molecules together for small fractions of a second. Water molecules are constantly on the move.
    Then shouldn't everything be in liquid form because some things only have London forces (which are the weakest) but are still solid?
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    (Original post by Alisahhh1998)
    Water has London forces, dipole -dipole interactions and hydrogen bonding, why isn't it a solid? Because with all of these intermolecular forces shouldn't it be really hard for it to be in liquid form because you have to break some of the intermolecular forces at high energy because of how stable the molecule is together so the atoms are more moveable?
    It may be to do with the strength of the intermolecular forces.
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    (Original post by SANTR)
    It may be to do with the strength of the intermolecular forces.
    I thought hydrogen bonds are the strongest intermolecular force? Water contains all three intermolecular force (to my a level knowlegde)
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    (Original post by Alisahhh1998)
    Then shouldn't everything be in liquid form because some things only have London forces (which are the weakest) but are still solid?
    yh and those things that have London forces are liquid
    and they are only held for a fraction of a second so maybe for a moment they are solid but then change the molecules make new dipoles and so it they dont stay in that from??
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    (Original post by Ishea16)
    yh and those things that have London forces are liquid
    and they are only held for a fraction of a second so maybe for a moment they are solid but then change the molecules make new dipoles and so it they dont stay in that from??
    Graphite is in solid form and only has London forces (as far as I'm aware)
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    Intermolecular forces =/= covalent bonds between atoms in a molecule. So in this case hydrogen bonds =/= O-H bonds in the molecules. Be careful not to confuse the enthalpy of atomisation with the energy required to break 1 mole of hydrogen bonds.

    What you need to bear in mind is that while hydrogen bonds are the behemoths of the intermolecular forces, they're flimsy as hell when compared to covalent and/or ionic and/or metallic (if you think of the structure that way at least) bonds. To give you an idea of this flimsiness, the peroxide bond has a puny dissociation energy of about 81kcal/mol. It's by far one of the flimsiest covalent bonds you'll come across in chemicals used outside of a lab. The energy required to break one mole of hydrogen bonds is a mere 1.5kcal/mol. Now bearing in mind that the bond dissociation energy of O-H bonds in water is about 111kcal/mol and there's two of them... that's a pretty big difference. This is why water molecules don't spontaneously fly apart, the covalent bonds in the molecule are really strong.
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    (Original post by Alisahhh1998)
    I thought hydrogen bonds are the strongest intermolecular force? Water contains all three intermolecular force (to my a level knowlegde)
    Hydrogen bonds are the strongest intermolecular forces. But there are stronger forces then hydrogen bonds that are not intermolecular.

    Ionic bonding, metallic bonding is stronger for example. Hence solid.
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    (Original post by Alisahhh1998)
    Graphite is in solid form and only has London forces (as far as I'm aware)
    it has van der waals so London forces and instantaneous dipole ones aswell
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    (Original post by SGHD26716)
    Hydrogen bonds are the strongest intermolecular forces. But there are stronger forces then hydrogen bonds that are not intermolecular.

    Ionic bonding, metallic bonding is stronger for example. Hence solid.
    Isn't the state of a substance determined by the intermolecular forces and not the bonds between atoms i.e. the bonds within a molecule?
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    (Original post by Alisahhh1998)
    Graphite is in solid form and only has London forces (as far as I'm aware)
    Graphite is a macromolecule. It has a large network of covalent bonds which have to be broke and hence it has a very high melting and boiling point.
    It does have Van der Waals forces between the hexagonal layers, however, this only causes the layers to slide past eachother. Energy is required to break most of the covalent bonds in graphite in order to break the lattice structure.
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    (Original post by SANTR)
    Isn't the state of a substance determined by the intermolecular forces and not the bonds between atoms i.e. the bonds within a molecule?
    The state of a substance is determined by its structure, I believe.

    Intermolecular forces are forces between molecules

    Ionic and metallic bonding is between individual atoms
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    Okay I get it now, thank you so much for your help! And sorry for being awkward 😁
 
 
 
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