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    (Original post by Jokonkwo)
    I'm not good at maths either, got a C for gcse but going to redo it again to get a B. Wow so if chemistry/maths isn't even wholly part of the course then I guess I might as we still try my best and get a decent grade in chemistry when I pick it up again.

    Which university do you go to ?
    In my mock finals at Liverpool (I'm in my final year here) I had to use moles to calculate how much of potassium I had to add to a 5L back of fluids. That's as much Chemistry as I need to know. As Lizzie said there are some modules which require basic Chemistry.

    In terms of maths you need to be able to work out how much drugs to give to an animal based on it's weight and drug concentration. Not very difficult, you just need to remember some steps but you do it often so it'll get ingrained in you.

    I struggled with Chemistry, especially at A2 level, I got a grade B overall with a hell of a lot of effort (teachers thought I'd be very lucky if I got a C grade; originally they wanted to predict me a D) but have not struggled with the vet course at all.

    Liverpool is the only vet school which ONLY require grade B chemistry to AS level (along side 3As at A2). All others require Chemistry to A2 level. Bear in mind Liverpool's high work experience requirement though!
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    (Original post by Jokonkwo)
    I'm not good at maths either, got a C for gcse but going to redo it again to get a B. Wow so if chemistry/maths isn't even wholly part of the course then I guess I might as we still try my best and get a decent grade in chemistry when I pick it up again.

    Which university do you go to ?
    I'm a second year at Liverpool.
    As above, there is some chemistry and maths but it's drummed into you from day one so you actually get used to the calculations and it gets so much easier, before i started, working out drip rates was something that seriously scared me, I literally thought I couldn't do it. 2 years on and I can do it straight away and it comes naturally to me.


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    I am surprised people who can't do maths and chemistry well are going to be come vets. I have pets and I would want them to be cared for by the most intelligent people who can treat them properly, not someone who struggles with basic skills.


    This is very worrying.
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    (Original post by Maker)
    I am surprised people who can't do maths and chemistry well are going to be come vets. I have pets and I would want them to be cared for by the most intelligent people who can treat them properly, not someone who struggles with basic skills.

    This is very worrying.
    The things is, there stuff they teach you at school in Maths and Chemistry classes, particularly at A level, is not very relevant to being a vet. Yes, you need to know how the drugs work (biochemistry) and calculate a dose/fluid rate for your patients (basic maths), but beyond that there is no real need to know how to intergrate/algebra or how to use titratation to work out the pH. Calculators are everywhere so you don't even need to do sums in your head although eventually you will learn common doses for common drugs. The most relevant A level was actually biology (excluding everything we learn about plants).

    The entrance criteria for vet school is now higher than ever and we have to prove that we can treat animals safely and appropriately throughout our time at uni and during exams (especially finals) where we are given real life scenarios and have to make the correct decisions. Rest assured that all graduates are trained well to deal with your pets.

    I personally struggled with Chemistry at A level because it didn't interest me, I had no natural talent in it, and some of my teachers were abysmal. I was still considered one of the most intelligent in my year though but I don't always perform well in an exam setting. At vet school I am getting high grades and have never failed an exam - I am actually doing better than when I did at school because it's more relevant. Being a good vet isn't just about the academic side either - you can be the most intelligent person in the world but if you can't explain things so an owner understands, if you can't sympathise with them, if you have poor practical skills then the animal will suffer regardless.
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    (Original post by Maker)
    I am surprised people who can't do maths and chemistry well are going to be come vets. I have pets and I would want them to be cared for by the most intelligent people who can treat them properly, not someone who struggles with basic skills.


    This is very worrying.
    I don't quite think you know anything about the veterinary medicine degree 😂



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    (Original post by SilverstarDJ)
    The things is, there stuff they teach you at school in Maths and Chemistry classes, particularly at A level, is not very relevant to being a vet. Yes, you need to know how the drugs work (biochemistry) and calculate a dose/fluid rate for your patients (basic maths), but beyond that there is no real need to know how to intergrate/algebra or how to use titratation to work out the pH. Calculators are everywhere so you don't even need to do sums in your head although eventually you will learn common doses for common drugs. The most relevant A level was actually biology (excluding everything we learn about plants).

    The entrance criteria for vet school is now higher than ever and we have to prove that we can treat animals safely and appropriately throughout our time at uni and during exams (especially finals) where we are given real life scenarios and have to make the correct decisions. Rest assured that all graduates are trained well to deal with your pets.

    I personally struggled with Chemistry at A level because it didn't interest me, I had no natural talent in it, and some of my teachers were abysmal. I was still considered one of the most intelligent in my year though but I don't always perform well in an exam setting. At vet school I am getting high grades and have never failed an exam - I am actually doing better than when I did at school because it's more relevant. Being a good vet isn't just about the academic side either - you can be the most intelligent person in the world but if you can't explain things so an owner understands, if you can't sympathise with them, if you have poor practical skills then the animal will suffer regardless.
    Its got nothing to do with maths or chemistry being relevant. Its about the intellectual calibre of the vet. If someone struggles with those subjects, how are they going to cope with none routine stuff that needs someone who can bring together different symptoms to diagnose and treat a problem.
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    (Original post by Lizziefickling)
    I don't quite think you know anything about the veterinary medicine degree 😂



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    I don't want to know about a vet degree, I want to know how a vet can treat my pets.
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    (Original post by Maker)
    I don't want to know about a vet degree, I want to know how a vet can treat my pets.
    Which they are taught how to do in Vet school and not A-level chemistry class.

    (Original post by Maker)
    Its got nothing to do with maths or chemistry being relevant. Its about the intellectual calibre of the vet. If someone struggles with those subjects, how are they going to cope with none routine stuff that needs someone who can bring together different symptoms to diagnose and treat a problem.
    Show me a single vet/medical student that didn't struggle with anything and enjoyed all of their A-Level subjects.
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    (Original post by Maker)
    I don't want to know about a vet degree, I want to know how a vet can treat my pets.
    With 5 years of training and a whole lot of hard work that goes into it. We don't go to uni and spend 90% of our holidays on placements to come out of it and not be competent vets at the end. The degree is hard work, and I know for one that I work darn hard to ensure I know the stuff I've been taught as well as I possibly can.
    It's not all about whether you're good at maths or chemistry or not, the course isn't about that. It's not an easy course to get on to, and students spend a lot of time doing work experience placement before even getting on to the degree. If we weren't 'intelligent' enough, we wouldn't have been given a place.
    It's got nothing to do with how clever you are or how good at certain subjects you are, it's about how hard you work when you get there. At the end of the day we have to pass exams to progress through the course, if we weren't doing that then we wouldn't be here.
    They don't just give anyone a veterinary medicine degree, and those that graduate work hard to get it!


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    (Original post by Maker)
    Its got nothing to do with maths or chemistry being relevant. Its about the intellectual calibre of the vet. If someone struggles with those subjects, how are they going to cope with none routine stuff that needs someone who can bring together different symptoms to diagnose and treat a problem.
    I totally agree with what Lizzie and Nessie have said.

    I think you need to question whether performance at A level in a particular subject is a good indicator of intelligence and what other factors may come into play with regards to someone's grade. How do you define intelligence anyway? I think it is more than just how well people perform at exams.

    When you get to vet school you realise that being a good vet involves a good memory, problem solving, logical thinking and knowing where to find the right information (whether that be books, the literature or talking to specialists - especially for unusual cases) along side practical AND interpersonal skills. Those are all facets of intelligence (including emotional intelligence) but are not tested very well (or at all) at A level. I got improved A level grades by doing practice papers and learning how I should write my answer, rather than what the answer was itself!
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    (Original post by SilverstarDJ;[url="tel:63713243")
    63713243[/url]]I totally agree with what Lizzie and Nessie have said.

    I think you need to question whether performance at A level in a particular subject is a good indicator of intelligence and what other factors may come into play with regards to someone's grade. How do you define intelligence anyway? I think it is more than just how well people perform at exams.

    When you get to vet school you realise that being a good vet involves a good memory, problem solving, logical thinking and knowing where to find the right information (whether that be books, the literature or talking to specialists - especially for unusual cases) along side practical AND interpersonal skills. Those are all facets of intelligence (including emotional intelligence) but are not tested very well (or at all) at A level. I got improved A level grades by doing practice papers and learning how I should write my answer, rather than what the answer was itself!

    Totally agree with both of you
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    (Original post by SilverstarDJ;[url="tel:63690299")
    63690299[/url]]In my mock finals at Liverpool (I'm in my final year here) I had to use moles to calculate how much of potassium I had to add to a 5L back of fluids. That's as much Chemistry as I need to know. As Lizzie said there are some modules which require basic Chemistry.

    In terms of maths you need to be able to work out how much drugs to give to an animal based on it's weight and drug concentration. Not very difficult, you just need to remember some steps but you do it often so it'll get ingrained in you.

    I struggled with Chemistry, especially at A2 level, I got a grade B overall with a hell of a lot of effort (teachers thought I'd be very lucky if I got a C grade; originally they wanted to predict me a D) but have not struggled with the vet course at all.

    Liverpool is the only vet school which ONLY require grade B chemistry to AS level (along side 3As at A2). All others require Chemistry to A2 level. Bear in mind Liverpool's high work experience requirement though!

    Do you think Liverpool will change the grade requirements? I wouldn't mind suffering for 6 months to get a b or above in chemistry AS if I pick it up again next year
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    (Original post by Jokonkwo)
    Do you think Liverpool will change the grade requirements? I wouldn't mind suffering for 6 months to get a b or above in chemistry AS if I pick it up again next year
    They usually stay more or less the same. They have increased the requirements recently, I wouldn't have thought they would do anything until the new A level grade system thingy comes in


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    (Original post by Jokonkwo)
    Hi guys I'm new to this so please bare with me.

    I'm currently studying english literature, psychology and Biology, I dropped chemistry because the content deprived me from revising for my other subjects.
    I had (still have) my heart set on becoming a vet, I looked at RVC and they said to get a degree in veterinary nursing and then could transfer to veterinary medicine, but does anyone know any other universities that offer this too? And has anyone here taken this route?
    To be a vet you really ought to take chemistry, even for vet nursing I think. If you struggle with chemistry now you really won't be able to cope in vet school because 90% is chemistry related plus you will have to go to school 9am-5pm pretty much everyday of the week on top of extra few hours revision a day, so there isn't much time to take your time learning chemistry if you struggle with it.
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    (Original post by Student_118)
    To be a vet you really ought to take chemistry, even for vet nursing I think. If you struggle with chemistry now you really won't be able to cope in vet school because 90% is chemistry related plus you will have to go to school 9am-5pm pretty much everyday of the week on top of extra few hours revision a day, so there isn't much time to take your time learning chemistry if you struggle with it.
    Very little of the vet med course is chemistry based... It's more biology based. There's a small amount of biochemistry in the first year but I wouldn't say it was anywhere near 90% chemistry based.


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    (Original post by Jokonkwo)
    Do you think Liverpool will change the grade requirements? I wouldn't mind suffering for 6 months to get a b or above in chemistry AS if I pick it up again next year
    Since I started vet school 5 years ago, Liverpool's entry requirements have increased once. So there is no guarantee they will stay the same but generally you can look at the entry requirements a year or so in advanced
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    (Original post by Jokonkwo)
    Oh! You're studying to become a vet, how is it like ? And with what you have to study in university is it hard, harder than A levels or easier ? Because although the content for chemistry was fine but when it came to the exam papers everything went wrong for me. Even now that I'll only have 3 a levels when would you say would be the bet time for me to pick up chemistry again?
    In my first term of vet school I filled 4 lever arch files with course notes - that was about equal to the amount of notes I took during two years doing A-levels!

    It is not a course that you can expect to attend the lectures and cram for a week before your exams and still pass. Expect to have to do a lot of extra revision outside of 9-5 lectures/practicals most days and then struggle to pass your exams

    I was a straight A/A* student going into vet school and I still failed a lot of exams in my first years of study before I worked out how to revise and how much I needed to do to pass comfortably.

    (Original post by Lizziefickling)
    I didn't, no. I was a trainee vet nurse but I worked as a vet nurse assistant for 7 years between finishing my GCSEs and my first degree. I did bio veterinary science for my first degree.

    My housemate is also doing vet med as her second degree and she doesn't have the means to have family help pay for tuition fees. She does struggle, and has to work every holiday to attempt to save up. I wouldn't ever want to watch someone else go through that, hence why I would never advise doing vet med as a second degree unless there is a way of paying for it.
    Unfortunately I feel a lot of grad vet students simply focus on the goal of becoming a vet, few give any thought as to how they are going to pay off their loans when they do graduate or how that amount of debt is going to affect their life.

    A friend of mine graduated recently with £100,000-200,000 of student debt, when their first repayments were due they exceeded their monthly salary!

    Eventually we got their debt repayments reduced via "means tested repayments" so that they had some money to live off but but it isn't much and they could never afford to buy their own home.

    I think that if they knew now what they did then they would have reconsidered the grad route, or at the very least got a part time job and been more frugal. Being in that amount of debt can nurture an unhealthy mindset (ie; "I'm already in £100,000+ of debt so what is another £800 on a new laptop or £1,000 on flights to volunteer abroad...").

    (Original post by Jokonkwo)
    Wow I honestly appreciate this, making me think carefully. Do you think someone who's not very strong in maths/mathematics in chemistry will struggle with the veterinary medicine course?

    And I feel like I may just pick up chemistry again next year, so might spend 3 years in sixth form.
    If you are already struggling with the A-level course, whether it's understanding, volume, revision technique or self discipline, that is going to be multiplied by any vet course.

    I do know of applicants who got in with below average grades, and some that even went on to graduate, but by and large they struggled more than most and a lot dropped out.
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    (Original post by ch0c0h01ic)
    Unfortunately I feel a lot of grad vet students simply focus on the goal of becoming a vet, few give any thought as to how they are going to pay off their loans when they do graduate or how that amount of debt is going to affect their life.

    A friend of mine graduated recently with £100,000-200,000 of student debt, when their first repayments were due they exceeded their monthly salary!

    Eventually we got their debt repayments reduced via "means tested repayments" so that they had some money to live off but but it isn't much and they could never afford to buy their own home.

    I think that if they knew now what they did then they would have reconsidered the grad route, or at the very least got a part time job and been more frugal. Being in that amount of debt can nurture an unhealthy mindset (ie; "I'm already in £100,000+ of debt so what is another £800 on a new laptop or £1,000 on flights to volunteer abroad...").
    I'm fortunate in that my family pay for my fees and if I am in any situation financially when I graduate they will bail me out if needed. I'm not quite sure how your friend ended up in that much debt since you don't get a tuition fee loan for a second degree, and I'll come out with £60,000 debt from maintenance loans/my previous degrees tuition fees.

    I know exactly how much money I spend and I'm very careful with it haha!



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    (Original post by Lizziefickling)
    I'm fortunate in that my family pay for my fees and if I am in any situation financially when I graduate they will bail me out if needed. I'm not quite sure how your friend ended up in that much debt since you don't get a tuition fee loan for a second degree, and I'll come out with £60,000 debt from maintenance loans/my previous degrees tuition fees.

    I know exactly how much money I spend and I'm very careful with it haha!
    Five years of full tuition fees (£15,000-£25,000 a year), plus rent (~£3,000-4,000 a year), plus living costs (~£1,000-3,000 a year) and interest to top it all off.
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    (Original post by ch0c0h01ic)
    Five years of full tuition fees (£15,000-£25,000 a year), plus rent (~£3,000-4,000 a year), plus living costs (~£1,000-3,000 a year) and interest to top it all off.
    Did your friend take a personal loan out then to fund that?

    I'm lucky enough that my parents invested in a house for us which we pay minimal rent for (myself another grad student and my other half) so we fortunately won't end up in a load of debt because of it. I literally have my maintenance loan and income from a part time job to live off


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