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    I have the option of studying AS Level Further Maths AND EPQ, or A Level Further Maths. I am looking into studying Medicine at Oxbridge.

    Any advice on which would be better? I am capable of managing either. I would be doing this with my other A Levels in Biology, Chemistry, Maths and RS.

    Thanks!
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    Why not both. Also why RS for medicine?
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    Our school doesn't allow it. Also I would prefer to spend time on volunteering, BMAT, extra curricular etc. RS (Philosophy really) is for a good balance, and most importantly because I absolutely love it.
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    Weird school you have there. Should allow you to atleast take any 3 A levels with the EPQ in the second year, when you say further maths at A2 do you mean having 4 A levels. Anyway if your question and state completely applies then I would say AS further maths and the EPQ though I'm not sure how you would do AS further maths with the others, would you be taking 5 AS's then?
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    (Original post by Chloe85)
    Our school doesn't allow it. Also I would prefer to spend time on volunteering, BMAT, extra curricular etc. RS (Philosophy really) is for a good balance, and most importantly because I absolutely love it.
    I know plenty of medics who did take FM to A2, though there isn't much call for it. Whilst a 5th A2 would look nice, it'll take up much more of your time and is probably unnecessary - it might be more interesting, relevant and distinctive to go for the EPQ.
    At the end of the day it is your choice, and you may want to do some research into how medical schools you want to apply for rate an EPQ, and whether or not FM A2 is for you before you make a decision.
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    (Original post by Vikingninja)
    Weird school you have there. Should allow you to atleast take any 3 A levels with the EPQ in the second year, when you say further maths at A2 do you mean having 4 A levels. Anyway if your question and state completely applies then I would say AS further maths and the EPQ though I'm not sure how you would do AS further maths with the others, would you be taking 5 AS's then?
    Perhaps I didn't make this clear- my school doesn't allow you to have 4 Alevels AND EPQ. It is not allowed to do F Maths A Level AND EPQ. However, you can do AS and EPQ. If this is the case, then EPQ is done in the first year, and AS F Maths in the second.
    Also, I would only do RS as an AS. So, if did opt for F Maths Alevel, I would have 4 Alevels, and one AS.
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    (Original post by joostan)
    I know plenty of medics who did take FM to A2, though there isn't much call for it. Whilst a 5th A2 would look nice, it'll take up much more of your time and is probably unnecessary - it might be more interesting, relevant and distinctive to go for the EPQ.
    At the end of the day it is your choice, and you may want to do some research into how medical schools you want to apply for rate an EPQ, and whether or not FM A2 is for you before you make a decision.
    Thanks- sorry, just to point out I wouldn't be doing RS A2, only the AS and so would have 4 A Levels. I would really like to do the A2 purely because I love maths. Would it help or hinder an Oxbridge medic application in your opinion?
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    (Original post by Chloe85)
    Perhaps I didn't make this clear- my school doesn't allow you to have 4 Alevels AND EPQ. It is not allowed to do F Maths A Level AND EPQ. However, you can do AS and EPQ. If this is the case, then EPQ is done in the first year, and AS F Maths in the second.
    Also, I would only do RS as an AS. So, if did opt for F Maths Alevel, I would have 4 Alevels, and one AS.
    Yeah I would go with the EPQ instead of the full further maths. Makes you look more interesting in a uni application and you have more skills which will be very important at uni. Don't know loads about medicine but some people I know said you don't even need maths, so FM is not exactly that important towards it.
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    (Original post by Chloe85)
    Thanks- sorry, just to point out I wouldn't be doing RS A2, only the AS and so would have 4 A Levels. I would really like to do the A2 purely because I love maths. Would it help or hinder an Oxbridge medic application in your opinion?
    If you really enjoy maths, and want to do the A2 then go for it, it certainly won't harm your application and carries more weight than an EPQ, that said I doubt it'll help your position much either due to the fact that it doesn't really have a direct relevance to medicine.
    The EPQ would be more relevant and might give you something to talk about in an interview say, but at the end of the day they just want bright people and the EPQ is just a bonus.
    These subject choices don't matter that much, as they'll care more about biology and chemistry. Oxbridge also has other means of sifting through candidates namely with interviews/assessments and of course BMAT and UKCAT.
    I know for a fact that least two medics in my college who took further maths to A2, and loved it, and it certainly didn't hinder their application.
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    (Original post by joostan)
    If you really enjoy maths, and want to do the A2 then go for it, it certainly won't harm your application and carries more weight than an EPQ, that said I doubt it'll help your position much either due to the fact that it doesn't really have a direct relevance to medicine.
    The EPQ would be more relevant and might give you something to talk about in an interview say, but at the end of the day they just want bright people and the EPQ is just a bonus.
    These subject choices don't matter that much, as they'll care more about biology and chemistry. Oxbridge also has other means of sifting through candidates namely with interviews/assessments and of course BMAT and UKCAT.
    I know for a fact that least two medics in my college who took further maths to A2, and loved it, and it certainly didn't hinder their application.
    Thanks for this- I'll consider what you've said.
    I take it your a medic at Oxbridge? If you don't mind me asking you a very broad question..what's you're best advice on how to be a successful applicant (apart from being exceptionally bright, of course)?
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    (Original post by Chloe85)
    Thanks for this- I'll consider what you've said.
    I take it your a medic at Oxbridge? If you don't mind me asking you a very broad question..what's you're best advice on how to be a successful applicant (apart from being exceptionally bright, of course)?
    I'm actually not a medic - I'm a mathematician.
    Before, at Cambridge at least, UMS was a major factor, however what with all the changes to the exam system it isn't so clear cut, there will be assessments at interview instead, and I imagine Oxford has something similar set up.
    I'd say the most important thing would be to perform well at interview, of course that requires getting an interview.

    Getting an interview at Cambridge is relatively standard, they interview around 90% of candidates, and so performing well academically, and having the appropriate experience as a volunteer and the like will probably be sufficient.
    It is however my understanding is that at Oxford, far fewer candidates are interviewed and so your application will likely need to be more competitive.
    There are things one can try to do - college selection based on certain statistics which can be found on websites is one way, but it isn't sure fire.

    Something worth saying is that Oxbridge isn't necessarily the best place to study medicine, somewhere like UCL and Imperial is certainly well worth looking into because of their closer association to hospitals and more patient contact time.
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    (Original post by joostan)
    I'm actually not a medic - I'm a mathematician.
    Before, at Cambridge at least, UMS was a major factor, however what with all the changes to the exam system it isn't so clear cut, there will be assessments at interview instead, and I imagine Oxford has something similar set up.
    I'd say the most important thing would be to perform well at interview, of course that requires getting an interview.

    Getting an interview at Cambridge is relatively standard, they interview around 90% of candidates, and so performing well academically, and having the appropriate experience as a volunteer and the like will probably be sufficient.
    It is however my understanding is that at Oxford, far fewer candidates are interviewed and so your application will likely need to be more competitive.
    There are things one can try to do - college selection based on certain statistics which can be found on websites is one way, but it isn't sure fire.

    Something worth saying is that Oxbridge isn't necessarily the best place to study medicine, somewhere like UCL and Imperial is certainly well worth looking into because of their closer association to hospitals and more patient contact time.
    I see, out of curiosity what made you choose Cambridge over Oxford? Also, because Cambridge accept a larger number of applicants than Oxford, I assume they have a higher success rate?

    Volunteering is very important, I'm looking into getting placements now. Academically, I think I will be fine. BMAT/UKCAT is also important. College selection based on stats in my opinion, isn't a good idea in my opinion. They accept people of the same standard all around.

    I know that, UCL and Imperial are my next options, just that I'm keeping Oxbridge in mind. Obviously when the time comes, I'll have to decide which course I prefer.

    Thanks!
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    (Original post by Chloe85)
    I see, out of curiosity what made you choose Cambridge over Oxford? Also, because Cambridge accept a larger number of applicants than Oxford, I assume they have a higher success rate?

    Volunteering is very important, I'm looking into getting placements now. Academically, I think I will be fine. BMAT/UKCAT is also important. College selection based on stats in my opinion, isn't a good idea in my opinion. They accept people of the same standard all around.

    I know that, UCL and Imperial are my next options, just that I'm keeping Oxbridge in mind. Obviously when the time comes, I'll have to decide which course I prefer.

    Thanks!
    I chose Cambridge over Oxford because I preferred the town, and though the courses are pretty similar there seemed to be more freedom with the Cambidge course. That and the Cambridge course is arguably more prestigious.
    The fact that most people get an interview appealed to me too, so I wouldn't be shown the door without a fair trial as it were.
    According to this website a smidge under 40% of Oxford applicants got an offer this rotation, which isn't so bad - what proportion of those get in on the other hand is different. There's also this here for Cambridge which gives more information I think, you can play around with it and see what you think.

    When I said choosing colleges based on stats I looked at the colleges that gave proportionally the most interviews, then chose one that I liked from the ones with the best stats. Whilst you're correct about people of the same standards getting in everywhere, the competition at certain colleges is certainly higher and there's no auto-pooling for maths and medicine, so I was hoping to impress.

    I was nearly a medic actually, but after a couple of placements I decided it probably wasn't for me
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    (Original post by joostan)
    I chose Cambridge over Oxford because I preferred the town, and though the courses are pretty similar there seemed to be more freedom with the Cambidge course. That and the Cambridge course is arguably more prestigious.
    The fact that most people get an interview appealed to me too, so I wouldn't be shown the door without a fair trial as it were.
    According to this website a smidge under 40% of Oxford applicants got an offer this rotation, which isn't so bad - what proportion of those get in on the other hand is different. There's also this here for Cambridge which gives more information I think, you can play around with it and see what you think.

    When I said choosing colleges based on stats I looked at the colleges that gave proportionally the most interviews, then chose one that I liked from the ones with the best stats. Whilst you're correct about people of the same standards getting in everywhere, the competition at certain colleges is certainly higher and there's no auto-pooling for maths and medicine, so I was hoping to impress.

    I was nearly a medic actually, but after a couple of placements I decided it probably wasn't for me
    I think it's around 16% roughly for Oxford success rate, slightly higher for Cambridge. I've played around with that many times.

    Competition is higher for certain colleges? Which? Don't they accept more though, or first rejections get put into the pool?

    I was a nearly a prospective maths applicant, but realised that I would like to do medicine- I want to be a psychiatrist. Although, I would absolutely love to do Philosophy at Cambrige. Or even Natural Sciences sounds like something I would really enjoy. I guess I should be be firm in my decision about Medicine.

    Do you mind me asking you a few questions like GCSE/ A Level results related? Can I private message you?
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    (Original post by Chloe85)
    I think it's around 16% roughly for Oxford success rate, slightly higher for Cambridge. I've played around with that many times.

    Competition is higher for certain colleges? Which? Don't they accept more though, or first rejections get put into the pool?

    I was a nearly a prospective maths applicant, but realised that I would like to do medicine- I want to be a psychiatrist. Although, I would absolutely love to do Philosophy at Cambrige. Or even Natural Sciences sounds like something I would really enjoy. I guess I should be be firm in my decision about Medicine.

    Do you mind me asking you a few questions like GCSE/ A Level results related? Can I private message you?
    The course for medicine at Cambridge includes a year of pure NatSci if that's something you're interested in, you might be allowed to Psychology instead though tbh I can't remember.
    Some of the more famous colleges like King's are deceptively small, and so get a lot of applicants but can't take all that many. Colleges that are near the top of the Tompkins table often get washed with applicants, and every now and then a College just has a busy year for one reason or another.

    Feel free to PM me
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    Some med schools don't like applicants doing further maths (they don't count further maths as one of your three A-levels). Since further maths would be your fourth A-level and fifth AS, you would still be able to apply to them, but I think they would probably find the EPQ more impressive.

    In previous years, one advantage of further maths for Cambridge specifically is that it is easier to guarantee high UMS in maths and further maths modules than in other subjects. So if you were very good at maths, you could get 100% UMS in further maths giving you a higher average (and a possible advantage) over someone whose fourth subject was history. I don't think this applies any more for most applicants, as AS's are being scrapped, so Cambridge won't ask for your UMS.

    Also, it's worth noting that Oxbridge has very little advantage over other universities for medicine, unless you want to go into research. If you are in the lucky position of having good enough grades to be in with a good shot at all med schools, you should apply based on their specialisms in medicine and teaching styles, rather than perceived prestige or teaching quality.
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    (Original post by Chloe85)
    Competition is higher for certain colleges? Which? Don't they accept more though, or first rejections get put into the pool?
    Overall, all colleges have pretty much the same success rate. However, I think one reason consider applying tactically is that colleges with fewer applications are probably more likely to interview you. I know someone who was rejected before interview by Trinity, but had good enough grades that I expect they would have got an interview from e.g. Girton.
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    (Original post by sweeneyrod)
    Some med schools don't like applicants doing further maths (they don't count further maths as one of your three A-levels). Since further maths would be your fourth A-level and fifth AS, you would still be able to apply to them, but I think they would probably find the EPQ more impressive.

    In previous years, one advantage of further maths for Cambridge specifically is that it is easier to guarantee high UMS in maths and further maths modules than in other subjects. So if you were very good at maths, you could get 100% UMS in further maths giving you a higher average (and a possible advantage) over someone whose fourth subject was history. I don't think this applies any more for most applicants, as AS's are being scrapped, so Cambridge won't ask for your UMS.

    Also, it's worth noting that Oxbridge has very little advantage over other universities for medicine, unless you want to go into research. If you are in the lucky position of having good enough grades to be in with a good shot at all med schools, you should apply based on their specialisms in medicine and teaching styles, rather than perceived prestige or teaching quality.
    Could I ask what you mean by 'unless you want to go into research'? In fact, I do want to go into research. I understand your point about choosing specialisms and teaching styles above prestige. Thanks for your response
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    (Original post by Chloe85)
    Could I ask what you mean by 'unless you want to go into research'? In fact, I do want to go into research. I understand your point about choosing specialisms and teaching styles above prestige. Thanks for your response
    As far as I know, Oxbridge (or at least Cambridge) have much less time spent in hospitals than other universities, and a greater emphasis on learning theory.
 
 
 
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