Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by PtGF)
    I've got B, C and D grades at A-Level from when I was 18. Not great, also not absolutely terrible, so I've been torn between trying an access course or just doing another A-Level to fix up my grades and have some recent study experience come the next UCAS cycle. Universities I've enquired to have left me with mixed messages.

    Currently leaning towards doing an A-Level, local college offers a one year course which sounds ideal. I'd have to self-fund, but having been a big fat failure, living at home and working minimum wage for the past few years I've got more than enough money saved up.
    Don't be too harsh on yourself!! I left my accountancy job to do 2 AS-levels whilst working part time as a delivery driver. Never worked so hard up until this year of my life!!
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Philip-flop)
    Don't be too harsh on yourself!! I left my accountancy job to do 2 AS-levels whilst working part time as a delivery driver. Never worked so hard up until this year of my life!!
    Sometimes I get a bit harsh with the self-deprecating humour I'm actually feeling fairly good, having a decent amount saved up takes some of the pressure off!

    Enjoying looking through past papers at the moment, might try and get some self study begun before the academic year begins.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hello all,
    On the spectrum of mature students, I'd guess I'm at the older end. I'm 39 and resitting my A2s.
    About 5 years ago, I changed careers, from being a news photographer to being a financial reporter. The process involved completing some professional qualifications, which rekindled my love of studying!
    After completing my AS exams in Math, Politics and Economics, life got in the way - we had 2 babies in three years.
    But, with qualification specifications changing, it is now or never. Either I complete the A2s in 2017, or it's back to the drawing board.
    Well, that's it, just wanted to introduce myself. Best of luck all.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by PtGF)
    Sometimes I get a bit harsh with the self-deprecating humour I'm actually feeling fairly good, having a decent amount saved up takes some of the pressure off!

    Enjoying looking through past papers at the moment, might try and get some self study begun before the academic year begins.
    That's fantastic! You sound very keen and willing to study towards an A-level!! Maybe buy a CGP revision book and study through one or two of the chapters and make notes over the summer to see if you want to carry on by September. It's never too early to start!

    What A-level are you hoping to sit exams for btw?

    (Original post by Manamarak)
    Hello all,
    On the spectrum of mature students, I'd guess I'm at the older end. I'm 39 and resitting my A2s.
    About 5 years ago, I changed careers, from being a news photographer to being a financial reporter. The process involved completing some professional qualifications, which rekindled my love of studying!
    After completing my AS exams in Math, Politics and Economics, life got in the way - we had 2 babies in three years.
    But, with qualification specifications changing, it is now or never. Either I complete the A2s in 2017, or it's back to the drawing board.
    Well, that's it, just wanted to introduce myself. Best of luck all.
    Oh wow!! This is very inspirational! You've shown me that it's possible for a career change at any age and that you're never too old to study! Age is just a number after all!! Yeah you're doing the right thing by going for it now instead of after the new specs fully come into play! Luckily for you though, A-level Maths will continue to operate under the current spec so you can save A2 for a later date whilst you focus on A2 Economics and Politics!

    Congrats on having kids though! I bet this'll make them very proud of you when they're old enough to know what A-levels are!!!
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Philip-flop)
    That's fantastic! You sound very keen and willing to study towards an A-level!! Maybe buy a CGP revision book and study through one or two of the chapters and make notes over the summer to see if you want to carry on by September. It's never too early to start!

    What A-level are you hoping to sit exams for btw?
    I'm a bit torn between doing Maths or doing Physics again. Maths would be a new A-Level for me, Physics would be something I've done already but performed poorly in, although I'm actually interested in a lot of the stuff in physics.

    I didn't do a good job of revision when I did my A-Levels at school, I think having a little more maturity now I could actually do a proper job of them
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by PtGF)
    I'm a bit torn between doing Maths or doing Physics again...
    What degree are you thinking of doing?
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    Philip-flop Manamarak PtGF Schadenfreude65


    Don't worry too much. If you ever lose motivation or need inspiration, read on. Good luck!



    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ali_Moeen_Nawazish

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education...12-months.html

    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    This is really good to hear, thank you for posting. I am 27, did good at GCSE and left school to teach horse riding. Then I went to college when I was 21 I think and did appalling- my brain had frazzled but the social life was ace fun. Left with C D E and worked abroad to get away. Came back, now in the middle of 3 A level studies (self teaching) of Maths, bio and chem. I've just finished the biology edexcel exams yesterday. For those asking- each year-you can study biology with edexcel at home and do your own experiments, write them up and this is the coursework of which marks go towards the final grade- you don't do practical exams. I was really glad when I heard this. I'll start the chem this year and finish the maths. I too had 2 children very close together, got married new house etc. at the beginning of the studies and I'm a full time mum. I have to say it was/ is very hard and you need a lot of determination but it teaches you to manage your time doesn't it! Also helps slow down the effects of baby brain!

    Well done to you and others here, I no longer feel alone with the feeling of trying to better yourself when you are older with life going on. I hope to have 3 a levels under my belt in 2 years time for further education (so I'll be in my 30's!) when kids are at school (depending on results!).If I'm lucky and get 3xA's I will def, consider vet or met school- can't decide yet because I love the countryside (grew up with horses and animals like someone else here).

    Good luck everyone, peace out
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    I am 30, I am doing a-levels in English language and literature combined and I am doing Psychology.

    I am also doing an Open university degree in Health and Social Care


    Access to HE in Social Work

    BSc Health and Social Care - pending
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Philip-flop)
    Don't be too harsh on yourself!! I left my accountancy job to do 2 AS-levels whilst working part time as a delivery driver. Never worked so hard up until this year of my life!!
    Hi there did you start a delievery job because it was an easier job to work around your studies rather than yoir previous job?
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Hii..

    i am in a similar situation like u guys. i am a international 12th grade student who wants to apply to Oxbridge and unfortunately my home qualifications are not considered seriously by them so i am self studying 4 whole A levels(Econ English lang History maths with CIE) for June examinations next year.It would cool if u peeps would like to get in touch with me(Maybe start a Whatsapp group Or something like that) Feel free to PM me
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    Strongly considering doing GCSE maths next year, although I start a law degree in Oct. and am concerned about how to manage the two.

    Will probably do it in my second year, and consider AS Maths after uni - or the final year of my degree.







    (Original post by Philip-flop)
    Aw, good luck! I'm studying Maths and Biology (self-teaching). So will you be going back to college or are you going to teach yourself?
    Were you previously good at maths? I'm very nervous about self teaching maths as I have a poor track record with it.
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    Hi all. Nice to hear from others in similar situations. My story:

    I did OK the first time around at A-Level, getting AAB, plus a B at AS-Level.

    I then went on to Uni at East Anglia and was getting good grades (I was on course for a 1:1), but sadly had to drop out in my final year due to ill mental health.

    Looking back and remembering how screwed up I was between of 15-24, I'm amazed I did as well as I did. I'm lucky to be alive.

    Three years on, I'm fully recovered and symptom-free. Now that I've got this amazing new thing called "confidence" I want to go back into education and pursue my ideal career as an A.I. Programmer. I made this decision a wee bit late in the applications process for the year, but what can you do.

    My background to date has a bit of an Arts/Humanities bent (English Literature, History, Government & Politics, Geography, American Literature, Creative Writing). By contrast almost all Artificial Intelligence courses require between an A*-B in Mathematics, and most would like you to have a A or B in Science too (preferably Physics or Chemistry), oh and they prefer A*AA to AAB students. So I'm a stretch on three counts for immediate entry. Plus there's the problem that I'll be flagged as a drop-out, and also STEM departments don't seem to like mature students as much (presumably because they worry that their skills have atrophied?). So I have basically no chance of getting in on the ground floor. Which is OK. If I'm not ready for that, I'm not ready.

    So I instead applied for a few maths/science Foundation Years, but again it's late in the day and the drop-out strike against my name seems likely to tip the balance against me.

    So my fallback position would be to do A-Levels Maths and Physics. Obviously there are lots of options to achieve this via long-distance learning. But my preference would be to do an intensive 1-year full-time course. The problem is finding a college that a) takes mature students, b) teaches physics, c) does intensive A-Levels, and d) is in the Greater London area.

    So far, no luck. But still looking!
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by JoPearson89)
    Hi all. Nice to hear from others in similar situations. My story:

    I did OK the first time around at A-Level, getting AAB, plus a B at AS-Level.

    I then went on to Uni at East Anglia and was getting good grades (I was on course for a 1:1), but sadly had to drop out in my final year due to ill mental health.

    Looking back and remembering how screwed up I was between of 15-24, I'm amazed I did as well as I did. I'm lucky to be alive.

    Three years on, I'm fully recovered and symptom-free. Now that I've got this amazing new thing called "confidence" I want to go back into education and pursue my ideal career as an A.I. Programmer. I made this decision a wee bit late in the applications process for the year, but what can you do.

    My background to date has a bit of an Arts/Humanities bent (English Literature, History, Government & Politics, Geography, American Literature, Creative Writing). By contrast almost all Artificial Intelligence courses require between an A*-B in Mathematics, and most would like you to have a A or B in Science too (preferably Physics or Chemistry), oh and they prefer A*AA to AAB students. So I'm a stretch on three counts for immediate entry. Plus there's the problem that I'll be flagged as a drop-out, and also STEM departments don't seem to like mature students as much (presumably because they worry that their skills have atrophied?). So I have basically no chance of getting in on the ground floor. Which is OK. If I'm not ready for that, I'm not ready.

    So I instead applied for a few maths/science Foundation Years, but again it's late in the day and the drop-out strike against my name seems likely to tip the balance against me.

    So my fallback position would be to do A-Levels Maths and Physics. Obviously there are lots of options to achieve this via long-distance learning. But my preference would be to do an intensive 1-year full-time course. The problem is finding a college that a) takes mature students, b) teaches physics, c) does intensive A-Levels, and d) is in the Greater London area.

    So far, no luck. But still looking!
    Hi! . I just wanted to congratulate you for getting back on track with your life. When mental illness strikes you young, it is extremely disruptive and can derail your life in so many ways. Well done for perservering

    I'm starting a second law degree in October, but I want to find some way to combine technology, law, and journalism. The problem is how to advance in maths and physics alongside studying the law....

    I'd like to chat. Could we pm sometime?
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Assan)
    Hi! . I just wanted to congratulate you for getting back on track with your life. When mental illness strikes you young, it is extremely disruptive and can derail your life in so many ways. Well done for perservering
    Thanks. tbh I really can't complain in the slightest. Other than my mental health I've been dealt an excellent hand in life. I'm just really eager now to get on and make the most of it!

    (Original post by Assan)
    I'm starting a second law degree in October, but I want to find some way to combine technology, law, and journalism. The problem is how to advance in maths and physics alongside studying the law....
    Studying them in tandem sounds pretty ambitious. But you know yourself. What was your first law degree btw?

    (Original post by Assan)
    I'd like to chat. Could we pm sometime?
    Sure, I'd love to.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by JoPearson89)
    ...So my fallback position would be to do A-Levels Maths and Physics. Obviously there are lots of options to achieve this via long-distance learning. But my preference would be to do an intensive 1-year full-time course. The problem is finding a college that a) takes mature students, b) teaches physics, c) does intensive A-Levels, and d) is in the Greater London area.

    So far, no luck. But still looking!
    Have you tried Hackney or Westminster? I have a (rather short) list of colleges offering A levels for adults here:
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=4126795

    Maths A level is quite easy to self-teach from text books, but physics is trickier because of the practical side. You could however, do maths A level and follow it up with an Access course. Before you start on any particular course though, you should contact the admissions tutors at your target universities with a brief email describing your situation and asking their advice on how you should proceed.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Audrey18)
    Philip-flop Manamarak PtGF Schadenfreude65


    Don't worry too much. If you ever lose motivation or need inspiration, read on. Good luck!



    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ali_Moeen_Nawazish

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education...12-months.html

    Holy crap, how even is that possible? He must have an insane IQ
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Schadenfreude65)
    Have you tried Hackney or Westminster? I have a (rather short) list of colleges offering A levels for adults here:
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=4126795

    Maths A level is quite easy to self-teach from text books, but physics is trickier because of the practical side. You could however, do maths A level and follow it up with an Access course. Before you start on any particular course though, you should contact the admissions tutors at your target universities with a brief email describing your situation and asking their advice on how you should proceed.
    Hi there. I've posted in the thread.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by JoPearson89)
    Studying them in tandem sounds pretty ambitious. But you know yourself. What was your first law degree btw.
    I completed my first degree seven or eight years ago now. It was in History. I'm starting law at Warwick in the fall.

    And yeah, I'm not sure about it, at all, but I'll just have to work hard and hope for the best.
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    A level Biology am 31 i have A levels already just none sicence i am just trying to get more on MY CV am a qualified registered Nurse for 3 years now but am hoping to do more science related things or medical areas not quite sure waying up my options lol
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Would you rather give up salt or pepper?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Write a reply...
    Reply
    Hide
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.