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    (Original post by ByronicHero)
    I think I would probably reference it when talking briefly about soft skills in my cover letter, but you are right it would look strange.
    True, although that space on your reference would be better used to talk about your work experience that have instilled in you soft skills. Doing a degree is not considered much of an accomplishment nowadays (at least not like when it was much rarer to go to university) - and really, if you're doing two similar degrees (which you'll probably have to if you actually want to get a good final mark), then the soft skills you gain will overlap and be the same - The only thing I can think of that you could say is carrying the burden of doing two full-time degrees teaches you time-keeping and organisation.

    The only way it would be impressive is if you did two traditional and completely different degrees that give different skills. Like, History and Mathematics or Economics and Statistics. And even then, it would only give a fleeting "wow factor" which is forgotten about once the employer moves down to look at your work experience.
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    (Original post by High Stakes)
    True, although that space on your reference would be better used to talk about your work experience that have instilled in you soft skills. Doing a degree is not considered much of an accomplishment nowadays (at least not like when it was much rarer to go to university) - and really, if you're doing two similar degrees (which you'll probably have to if you actually want to get a good final mark), then the soft skills you gain will overlap and be the same - The only thing I can think of that you could say is carrying the burden of doing two full-time degrees teaches you time-keeping and organisation.

    The only way it would be impressive is if you did two traditional and completely different degrees that give different skills. Like, History and Mathematics or Economics and Statistics. And even then, it would only give a fleeting "wow factor" which is forgotten about once the employer moves down to look at your work experience.
    I don't disagree with any of this. I agree that time management and commitment to the completion of tasks etc. would be all you could highlight and I also think (read: know) that it would, in general, make no difference to your job search at all. I was simply saying that I don't think having them on your CV would ultimately prove too confusing.

    Depending on what kind of career you are targeting you would be much better served gaining a relevant professional qualification alongside your degree or, frankly, using the hours you'd have spent on the second one gaining relevant experience.

    If somebody has the money and desire to, though, they can study two degrees concurrently.
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    (Original post by Slutty Salati)
    Will probably give you good experience when you work in Starbucks


    ''make mine a double''
    Painfully true.

    I'm an arts grad (going back to do a BSc this year).
    I wouldn't bother.

    1. Although contact hours are low, the work load isn't. In my final year I had 9 contact hours but I had essays/a dissertation/exam revision/seminar reading to stay on top of. I didn't have time for a P/T job - never mind another degree.

    2. It's useless. Unless you know exactly what you're doing a BA for then don't waste your time. Teaching? Fine, go for it. Armed Forces officer roles? Great, do what you like. Law conversion? Cool, get on with it. Generic grad scheme with a retailer (rather you than me)? Okay, have fun(!?). See what happens when you graduate or figure it out during the degree? No, no, no. Gap year. Hell, 5 gap years, 10 gap years...ad infinitum. Anything but 3 years getting tens of thousands into debt for a degree which won't get you a job and will prevent you from being able to retrain (max out your loans, max out your opportunities at tertiary level education). All so that you can chat to people in your McJob about Proust or Descartes. Been there, done that, got my soul destroyed. Learn for those who've walked that path. Do.Not.Bother.

    3. All of that X2? HAHA! Why? So you can go to an interview at Tesco and say ''But, I've got TWO useless degrees! TWO!!"

    No.

    Bottom line: no one will care that you have 2 BAs (but you)...and eventually, even you won't care.

    Do your future self a massive favor - do a useful degree in something that requires a skill which the current market needs. Read your favorite novels and history books in your spare time. Use the rest of your spare time to get work experience/internships etc. Graduate with a 2.1. Get a job. Don't spend 3 years doing ''what I love, man!!" and then the next 50 in low paid jobs rattling on about ''when I was at uni" etc. Or worse, spending all your free time on the dole reading Emily Bronte in the job center office.


    *Awaits current arts student hate - just wait til' graduation, then get back to me.*
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    I'm sure it's possible if you are well-organised. If people can work 20-30-hour jobs alongside a degree then they could also do a second degree instead. Work experience, or free-lancing experience building up a portfolio, may be more useful in the long run, but if these considerations aren't important (because your parents are well-off and / or well-connected), go for it!

    I know that, in Germany, it is possible to do this officially ("parallel study" or "double study").
    EG http://www.uni-kl.de/en/studies/prio...ee-programmes/
    I think in England, you would not be accepted onto two degree courses in parallel, and universities would not accept you being enrolled at another university at the same time. So you would probably have to do the second degree by distance-learning.
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    Why not just sogn up with Buckingham and study a 3 year degree over 2 years instead. If you're worried about the intensity of study not being enough to keep you interested it's a more sensible (and understood) option.
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    (Original post by llys)
    If people can work 20-30-hour jobs alongside a degree then they could also do a second degree instead.
    They don't. Not anyone at a brick uni. You can do this with the OU which is what I'm currently doing but it takes longer than 3 years and you have 0 contact hours in most cases (not counting online tutorials which aren't compulsory). It's nothing to do with being organised. 2 degrees at the same time (not joint honours or undergraduate masters) does not happen. My OU course is nowhere near the intensity of my brick uni degree - not because of content but because it's done slowly over a longer period or time and I don't have contact hours. That's why it frees me up to work full time - same as other OU students. Nothing to do with having super human organisation skills.

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    (Original post by somethingbeautiful)
    They don't. Not anyone at a brick uni. You can do this with the OU which is what I'm currently doing but it takes longer than 3 years and you have 0 contact hours in most cases (not counting online tutorials which aren't compulsory). It's nothing to do with being organised. 2 degrees at the same time (not joint honours or undergraduate masters) does not happen. My OU course is nowhere near the intensity of my brick uni degree - not because of content but because it's done slowly over a longer period or time and I don't have contact hours. That's why it frees me up to work full time - same as other OU students. Nothing to do with having super human organisation skills.

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    You are very categoric about this. I worked a good 20 hours per week as a lab assistant while I was studying for my science degree. That's an actual fact. I could have done more (on weekends), but as a student in Germany you are not allowed to work more than 20 hours per week. Anyway, like I said, in Germany you can officially do two degrees in parallel (not joint honours; two separate degrees, e.g. see here) - you can sign up for an Engineering degree and an Economics degree at the same university if you want and if they have places (you are not allowed to do this if places on both degrees are restricted and you would be taking a place away from someone else, so that limits your choices). You need to be organised because of timetable clashes - they will not rearrange timetables for you. I don't know how many people go through with it, but it does happen in Germany, otherwise universities would simply not allow it. I was actually thinking about doing this when I was at university, but I had to earn money and I didn't have a genuine "passion" for a second subject at the time anyway.
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    (Original post by llys)
    You are very categoric about this. I worked a good 20 hours per week as a lab assistant while I was studying for my science degree. That's an actual fact. I could have done more (on weekends), but as a student in Germany you are not allowed to work more than 20 hours per week. Anyway, like I said, in Germany you can officially do two degrees in parallel (not joint honours; two separate degrees, e.g. see here) - you can sign up for an Engineering degree and an Economics degree at the same university if you want and if they have places (you are not allowed to do this if places on both degrees are restricted and you would be taking a place away from someone else, so that limits your choices). You need to be organised because of timetable clashes - they will not rearrange timetables for you. I don't know how many people go through with it, but it does happen in Germany, otherwise universities would simply not allow it. I was actually thinking about doing this when I was at university, but I had to earn money and I didn't have a genuine "passion" for a second subject at the time anyway.
    I'm not talking about Germany. I'm talking about the UK. Since this is a UK website I thought that would have gone without saying.

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    (Original post by somethingbeautiful)
    I'm not talking about Germany. I'm talking about the UK.
    Oh, I see. So when you said it's not possible, you actually meant it's not allowed?
 
 
 
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