Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Do bent-over exercises gas you out more quickly? Watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    Was doing bent-over rows today and I kept having to finish sets before my back/rear delts were exhausted because I kept running out of breath.

    I did weighted pullups before and didn't have this problem despite it being a heavier lift than the rows.

    Is there even any point in lifting a set if you're going to gas out before you really fatigue the muscle you're targeting?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by dairychocolate)
    Was doing bent-over rows today and I kept having to finish sets before my back/rear delts were exhausted because I kept running out of breath.

    I did weighted pullups before and didn't have this problem despite it being a heavier lift than the rows.

    Is there even any point in lifting a set if you're going to gas out before you really fatigue the muscle you're targeting?
    It's quite odd you were out of breath?!

    How fatigued the muscle is from a workout isn't indicative of how effective the workout has been.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Cashmere_Cat)
    It's quite odd you were out of breath?!

    How fatigued the muscle is from a workout isn't indicative of how effective the workout has been.
    Not odd at all tbh, being bent over like that inhibits the airways.

    I assume he's talking about taking a muscle to immediate fatigue (muscular failure or close) rather than following day fatigue, which of course is one of the direct factors in judging the effectiveness of a workout

    dairychocolate
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by WoodyMKC)
    Not odd at all tbh, being bent over like that inhibits the airways.

    I assume he's talking about taking a muscle to immediate fatigue (muscular failure or close) rather than following day fatigue, which of course is one of the direct factors in judging the effectiveness of a workout

    dairychocolate
    Sorry I thought he meant DOMS.

    To be out of breathe though? Especially if you're inhaling/exhaling on the concentric/eccentric.

    When I say out of breathe, I mean the kind of out breath after 100m sprint.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    When i get up after a set of pendlay rows, i legit feel i'm gonna pass out because of the position you have to go in hahaha
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Cashmere_Cat)
    To be out of breathe though? Especially if you're inhaling/exhaling on the concentric/eccentric.
    Don't do this on rows.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SmashConcept)
    Don't do this on rows.
    Why? You hold your breath on on an entire set?
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Cashmere_Cat)
    Sorry I thought he meant DOMS.

    To be out of breathe though? Especially if you're inhaling/exhaling on the concentric/eccentric.

    When I say out of breathe, I mean the kind of out breath after 100m sprint.
    It's all well and good when you're starting out, but no matter how strong you get when you're yanking up a bar that has well over 100 kilos on it, it takes it out of you big time. I don't think I'd go as far as running out of breath before the set is finished and I can always manage to go to total failure, but I'm always blowing at the end of the set :lol:
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Cashmere_Cat)
    Why? You hold your breath on on an entire set?
    I guess I kinda take shallow breaths between reps and hold my breath during, same as on any other exercise except the breaths are shallower since you still need to stabilize the spine.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SmashConcept)
    I guess I kinda take shallow breaths between reps and hold my breath during, same as on any other exercise except the breaths are shallower since you still need to stabilize the spine.
    So you take shallow breaths on a heavy squat and deadlift which also require stabilization of the spine?

    I always find I'm exhaling at the top of the row pretty heavily. I don't bother with the decent I just let gravity do the work. Focusing on explosive work.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by WoodyMKC)
    It's all well and good when you're starting out, but no matter how strong you get when you're yanking up a bar that has well over 100 kilos on it, it takes it out of you big time. I don't think I'd go as far as running out of breath before the set is finished and I can always manage to go to total failure, but I'm always blowing at the end of the set :lol:
    Aiming for a sub 6:10 2k on an erg will take it out of me far more than any weighted exercise will

    Yeah I get what you mean, heavy squats 'take it out of me' where my heart is pumping crazy and I can barely hold a conversation, but to be out of breath at least for me is a totally different sensation.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Cashmere_Cat)
    So you take shallow breaths on a heavy squat and deadlift which also require stabilization of the spine?

    I always find I'm exhaling at the top of the row pretty heavily. I don't bother with the decent I just let gravity do the work. Focusing on explosive work.
    Squats yes, deadlifts don't need stabilization between reps since the weight is on the floor :confused:
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SmashConcept)
    Squats yes, deadlifts don't need stabilization between reps since the weight is on the floor :confused:
    Romanian

    Edit: Ok that was cheap..

    On a deadlift, the breath I take before the lift is massive, and I don't exhale until the weight is back down again. Even locked out I'm still holding my breathe.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I never 'gas out' doing them and I like to go just above 90 angle.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Cashmere_Cat)
    Romanian

    Edit: Ok that was cheap..

    On a deadlift, the breath I take before the lift is massive, and I don't exhale until the weight is back down again. Even locked out I'm still holding my breathe.
    RDLs are the same as squats, you can breathe a bit between reps because when you're that upright there is very little force pulling your lumbar spine out of neutral.
    • TSR Support Team
    • PS Reviewer
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    PS Reviewer
    (Original post by SmashConcept)
    I guess I kinda take shallow breaths between reps and hold my breath during, same as on any other exercise except the breaths are shallower since you still need to stabilize the spine.
    This pretty much. Tiny breaths but largely hold my breath

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by WoodyMKC)
    Not odd at all tbh, being bent over like that inhibits the airways.

    I assume he's talking about taking a muscle to immediate fatigue (muscular failure or close) rather than following day fatigue, which of course is one of the direct factors in judging the effectiveness of a workout

    dairychocolate
    Yep, that's what I meant.

    Basically, the muscle burning and failing until it can't do another rep (or thereabouts) with perfect form.

    Do you get the same problem + how is your cardio fitness?

    (Original post by Cashmere_Cat)
    Sorry I thought he meant DOMS.

    To be out of breathe though? Especially if you're inhaling/exhaling on the concentric/eccentric.

    When I say out of breathe, I mean the kind of out breath after 100m sprint.
    Well no, it's not like 'windsprint session' out of breath but I feel a general exhaustion of my body before I feel that my lats/back/rear delts/biceps/forearms in particular can't take any more. Not sure how to explain it. When I do pullups, I can feel that my lats and/or biceps are failing. When I do rows, I just get more and more gassed and eventually reach failure.

    I'm going to be doing a bunch of HIIT to improve cardio fitness in the summer so hopefully that will help.

    (Original post by SmashConcept)
    Don't do this on rows.
    Yeah, and I think this might be the issue. I'm usually holding my core and spine very taut and probably don't breathe the same as I do for a pullup. The breathing comes naturally on dead-hang pullups, really.

    Going to try doing the rows in a standing position on one of those adjustable cable machines.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by dairychocolate)
    Was doing bent-over rows today and I kept having to finish sets before my back/rear delts were exhausted because I kept running out of breath.

    I did weighted pullups before and didn't have this problem despite it being a heavier lift than the rows.

    Is there even any point in lifting a set if you're going to gas out before you really fatigue the muscle you're targeting?
    The food/supplement are likely to cause that, rather than the exercise
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ODES_PDES)
    The food/supplement are likely to cause that, rather than the exercise
    Interesting.

    I ate a PB + banana sandwich before so I'm not sure that a lack of carbs was the issue if that's what you mean.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by dairychocolate)
    Interesting.

    I ate a PB + banana sandwich before so I'm not sure that a lack of carbs was the issue if that's what you mean.
    I never have a solid meal before training (at least 4 hrs before).
    I just take a high carb drink before and during the session.
    Works well for me.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Brussels sprouts
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.