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    Im getting surgery and going under general anaesthetic, I have to get a catheter. I heard it really hurts how do they even put it in??
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    (Original post by MACmakeupgirl)
    Im getting surgery and going under general anaesthetic, I have to get a catheter. I heard it really hurts how do they even put it in??
    If you need it for the surgery they will usually put it in when you are already under and take it out before you wake up. Mind if I ask what type of surgery and if you are male or female? Is the catheter just for the surgery or will you need it afterwards too? I would assume they will at least put it in when you are under. They may leave it in if you won't be able to go by yourself for a good while after, but i expect they will take it out when you are under too.

    I had one for a laparoscopy and it was all done while I was out. No sign of having it at all.
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    As above, it will be placed while you're asleep and they don't hurt anyway even when you're awake. They're placed with a numbing jelly and it just feels a little strange.
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    It'll almost certainly be put in once you're asleep. Depending on the operation, it might be removed at the end of the procedure or shortly afterwards, or it might have to stay in for a day or more.

    The actual insertion is not particularly painful anyway, especially as they usually use local anaesthetic gel to lubricate it. Once the catheter is in, they aren't painful, though some people find them irritating and they can make you feel like you need to pee even though you don't/can't because the catheter is draining it all. Nothing much to worry about!
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    (Original post by Kindred)
    If you need it for the surgery they will usually put it in when you are already under and take it out before you wake up. Mind if I ask what type of surgery and if you are male or female? Is the catheter just for the surgery or will you need it afterwards too? I would assume they will at least put it in when you are under. They may leave it in if you won't be able to go by yourself for a good while after, but i expect they will take it out when you are under too.

    I had one for a laparoscopy and it was all done while I was out. No sign of having it at all.
    It's for jaw surgery on the NHS and I am female ty

    I think they put it in while Im asleep, and take it out either before the end of surgery or leave it in for a couple of days because I stay in the hospital.

    (Original post by Etomidate)
    As above, it will be placed while you're asleep and they don't hurt anyway even when you're awake. They're placed with a numbing jelly and it just feels a little strange.
    Will it definitely be put in while Im asleep? I was reading a hysterectomy forum (though I'm getting jaw surgery) and read that some people have it put in or taken out while awake :eek: Also, some say it hurts to go the toilet for weeks after its removed.

    (Original post by Helenia)
    It'll almost certainly be put in once you're asleep. Depending on the operation, it might be removed at the end of the procedure or shortly afterwards, or it might have to stay in for a day or more.

    The actual insertion is not particularly painful anyway, especially as they usually use local anaesthetic gel to lubricate it. Once the catheter is in, they aren't painful, though some people find them irritating and they can make you feel like you need to pee even though you don't/can't because the catheter is draining it all. Nothing much to worry about!
    Thanks Its jaw surgery, so I will be under general anaesthetic and hospitalised afterwards. I heard some people say it hurts to go to the toilet for a while after they remove it?

    Can they use smaller ones? I'm worried it might not fit :eek:
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    In most instances a short term catheter will cause no pain during insertion, while in use, during removal or after.

    The most common causes of pain related to catheter's are trauma caused by tugging on the catheter and infection. Correctly inserted and quickly removed after a non urological surgery neither is likely to be a problem for you.

    There are a few different diameters of catheter to chose from and the doctor or nurse inserting the device will pick the best one for the job, fit is unlikely to be a problem either.
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    (Original post by MACmakeupgirl)
    It's for jaw surgery on the NHS and I am female ty

    I think they put it in while Im asleep, and take it out either before the end of surgery or leave it in for a couple of days because I stay in the hospital.



    Will it definitely be put in while Im asleep? I was reading a hysterectomy forum (though I'm getting jaw surgery) and read that some people have it put in or taken out while awake :eek: Also, some say it hurts to go the toilet for weeks after its removed.



    Thanks Its jaw surgery, so I will be under general anaesthetic and hospitalised afterwards. I heard some people say it hurts to go to the toilet for a while after they remove it?

    Can they use smaller ones? I'm worried it might not fit :eek:
    If it's for jaw surgery I doubt they will leave it in. As long as you are able to pee by yourself (physically capable) and get to the toilet they will have it out. Jaw surgery shouldn't interfere with that so don't worry. Even if you're in hospital for a couple of days you should be able to get to the toilet and they will probably want to getting up and things.

    The cathater will basically be to make sure you don't pee yourself on the table. They usually want you getting up to go to the loo to show that you are better.
    When I had one in for my surgery I woke up with it gone and couldn't feel any difference let alone pain from it (you'll be on painkillers anyway from the surgery remember). It wasn't at all a struggle or anything to pee (unless you count trying to get there).

    I think it is worse for men since they have a smaller gap and it has to go further so you may be getting some horror stories from that. You shouldn't have any idea it was even there. You'll be more distracted by everything else anyway. Even if there is a little discomfort (which there really shouldn't be) you won't be fussed by it cos your jaw and hand (from the iv) and anything else will be too distracting for you to care about it.

    You will be fine and they will take good care of you. Don't worry
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    (Original post by Nefarious)
    In most instances a short term catheter will cause no pain during insertion, while in use, during removal or after.

    The most common causes of pain related to catheter's are trauma caused by tugging on the catheter and infection. Correctly inserted and quickly removed after a non urological surgery neither is likely to be a problem for you.

    There are a few different diameters of catheter to chose from and the doctor or nurse inserting the device will pick the best one for the job, fit is unlikely to be a problem either.
    If it's only for a 3-hour operation and then shortly after will I have one with a balloon in? I looked on the Internet and lots of people say it hurt after it was taken out

    (Original post by Kindred)
    If it's for jaw surgery I doubt they will leave it in. As long as you are able to pee by yourself (physically capable) and get to the toilet they will have it out. Jaw surgery shouldn't interfere with that so don't worry. Even if you're in hospital for a couple of days you should be able to get to the toilet and they will probably want to getting up and things.

    The cathater will basically be to make sure you don't pee yourself on the table. They usually want you getting up to go to the loo to show that you are better.
    When I had one in for my surgery I woke up with it gone and couldn't feel any difference let alone pain from it (you'll be on painkillers anyway from the surgery remember). It wasn't at all a struggle or anything to pee (unless you count trying to get there).

    I think it is worse for men since they have a smaller gap and it has to go further so you may be getting some horror stories from that. You shouldn't have any idea it was even there. You'll be more distracted by everything else anyway. Even if there is a little discomfort (which there really shouldn't be) you won't be fussed by it cos your jaw and hand (from the iv) and anything else will be too distracting for you to care about it.

    You will be fine and they will take good care of you. Don't worry
    Thanks, PRSOM Im in hospital for a few days afterwards, I think. I know you can get up and around after day 2 but I think you need to stay in bed for a couple of hours after surgery?

    I read on a hysterectomy forum (so for women) the catheter leaves you hurting after they take it out, especially if you to the toilet
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    It feels a bit like having teeth being pulled. I had one in for 6 weeks in '97. Probably before you were born??
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    (Original post by MACmakeupgirl)
    If it's only for a 3-hour operation and then shortly after will I have one with a balloon in? I looked on the Internet and lots of people say it hurt after it was taken out
    The balloon is part of the tube and holds it in. It is inflated with sterile water once the tube has reached the bladder and is deflated before the device is removed.

    It's an integral part of a catheter, one without would just slide out, which is more or less what happens when they deflate the balloon once you're finished with the catheter.

    Don't trust people on the internet, trust me, I'm on the internet!
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    (Original post by MACmakeupgirl)
    If it's only for a 3-hour operation and then shortly after will I have one with a balloon in? I looked on the Internet and lots of people say it hurt after it was taken out



    Thanks, PRSOM Im in hospital for a few days afterwards, I think. I know you can get up and around after day 2 but I think you need to stay in bed for a couple of hours after surgery?

    I read on a hysterectomy forum (so for women) the catheter leaves you hurting after they take it out, especially if you to the toilet
    You're really unlikely to have it in for very long at all if it's for jaw surgery. A hysterectomy is totally different and will in itself cause pain on going to the toilet. As has been demonstrated, the balloon really makes no difference when it's being inserted/withdrawn.

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    (Original post by MACmakeupgirl)
    If it's only for a 3-hour operation and then shortly after will I have one with a balloon in? I looked on the Internet and lots of people say it hurt after it was taken out



    Thanks, PRSOM Im in hospital for a few days afterwards, I think. I know you can get up and around after day 2 but I think you need to stay in bed for a couple of hours after surgery?

    I read on a hysterectomy forum (so for women) the catheter leaves you hurting after they take it out, especially if you to the toilet
    As somebody else has already said, a hysterectomy is very different. Depending on how it is done the uterus will be taken out of the vagina which will clearly cause discomfort and affect anything inserted nearby. Any procedure in that general area will also cause dicomfort at the least. They are also more likely to need the catheter in for longer as hysterectomy can leave you unable to pee for a while. That means they are at higher risk of pain or complications. Even in those cases pain is rare.

    A catheter is used for so many types of surgery and on so many people with no difficulty or pain, but there will be cases where it does though and they are the ones who are likely to mention it. You are extremeely unlikely to even notice that it's been there let alone be one of the few who experiences pain.
    If you are still concerned when you get to the hospital then just talk to a nurse or your surgeon about it.

    I read loads of stories about other peoples surgeries and it had me worried about every little thing. My experience was nowhere near as scary or painful as i expected.
 
 
 
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