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    (Original post by Zinann)
    Trust me mate.


    You do NOT want a verbal tirade with me.
    I probably don't. You sound like a boring twonk.
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    (Original post by LLB with a big D)
    I probably don't. You sound like a boring twonk.


    You already got owned bad.


    Looks like you're one of those retards who never learns from their many mistakes.
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    (Original post by oli19919)
    Is it worth going to UCL/LSE over Bristol/Durham due to having a slightly better reputation (and being closer to the larger firms), despite the more expensive living/housing costs?
    In short, no, unless you are the type of person who is extremely proactive in networking and knocking down doors, and depending on the subject in question: obviously LSE is better than Bristol for something like Economics for example because Economics is not one of Bristol's strongest subjects. It also depends on whether you want to work abroad, London unis have very strong international reputations and connections compared to some places like St Andrews and Bristol which are smaller and aren't very well known outside the UK.

    Although depending on your financial situation, London is arguably a better place to live than a campus uni, because you don't feel so much like you are living in a bubble and you have opportunities beyond one small university community. Also all of the exhibitions, museums, concerts, tv recordings, restaurants, niche nightlife, exclusive bars, colourful community life, volunteering opportunities and everything else that comes with being in the UK's capital city.
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    (Original post by blackbluegreen)
    Please re-read my original post. That was precisely my point. The number of MC career events are the same (you can check on MC career websites - they tell you which unis they visit with dates). The difference of being in London is that for a proactive person they can go out and find more events going on in London. I attended a lot of public events, lectures, seminars, visits to Court of Appeal and Supreme Court etc. This can be done if you are in Bristol or Durham but a lot more difficult. For example, I sometimes pop into the Court of Appeal and sit in the public gallery to watch hearings. Now this doesn't have any direct bearing on career prospects, but it gives you great exposure. If you are like me and before university you have absolutely zero exposure to the law, being in London gives you the exposure and confidence needed.

    Again, Durham and Bristol are fantastic unis for law. City law firms and chambers won't prefer a student from London over one from outside London for that reason alone.

    I have not attended Durham or Bristol. I visited them at open days and I have friends there. So I can really only comment on my experience in London and common sense. Finances were also a concern for me when choosing a uni to attend - I asked myself the same question OP has, and I decided London was worth the extra cost.
    Sorry to butt in, but why would you want to visit the Supreme Court/Royal Courts of Justice? Is it from an employment point of view?

    They do, however, have organised trips from Bristol - in the mooting held at the SC, those who wanted to go there could do so, and with a visit to Norton Rose before that. However, no one really went there outside the participants.

    As for schemes, which is what rally matters, I went to the Shearman and Sterling Head Start scheme. While Durham's absence was noticeable -obviously due to location- so was KCL. Bristol and Nottingham had 4 and 2 people respectively, while there was only 1 from KCL. Anecdotal this is, but the location didn't seem to make any difference.

    That said, I did choose Bristol over KCL, so I am be biased, but I think choosing London purely because one thinks it gives an advantage in terms of employment is a weak argument. Lifestyle and whatnot I do accept.
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    (Original post by Zinann)
    You already got owned bad.


    Looks like you're one of those retards who never learns from their many mistakes.
    Just because you went to school with the Darkness doesn't mean you're some hard ****.
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    (Original post by LLB with a big D)
    .

    Everyone knows most people only pick law for bragging rights. It's literally paying 9k a year to read how to cheat your way out of things.

    At least with sciences, actual intelligence is valued over memorising.

    And to answer the question, as a resident here, i can assure you that living in London isn't worth it. Attending Durham and Bristol won't stop you getting a job. And you won't have to deal with *****y London transport/London rent prices
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    (Original post by Lawliettt)
    Everyone knows most people only pick law for bragging rights. It's literally paying 9k a year to read how to cheat your way out of things.

    At least with sciences, actual intelligence is valued over memorising.
    Lol... talking crap about law despite never having studied it. Sounds legit.
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    (Original post by *Stefan*)
    Lol... talking crap about law despite never having studied it. Sounds legit.
    I'll never understand why people still use this stupid reply. I can easily say you've never studied (insert subject here) so how are you talking too? It's not talking crap, it's true. That's what law is and that's the reason why many take it. A few (similar to medicine) even take it due to family peer pressure. Not because it's a fun degree.

    And I'm not ******** on the job prospects or w.e.

    I'm replying to the guy bashing computer science and intelligence despite ironically defending a subject that is 85% memorising
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    (Original post by Lawliettt)
    I'll never understand why people still use this stupid reply. I can easily say you've never studied (insert subject here) so how are you talking too?
    What? Did I talk crap about any subject here? No. You did. And that argument is perfectly valid, especially so since what you said makes no sense to someone who actually studies law.

    (Original post by Lawliettt)
    I'm not ******** on the job prospects or w.e.

    I'm replying to the guy bashing computer science and intelligence despite ironically defending a subject that is 85% memorising
    How did you get to that 85%? And what subject doesn't involve memorising?

    As in, pure crap. Case dismissed.
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    (Original post by blackbluegreen)
    My reason for choosing KCL above Bristol and Durham at undergrad, and now choosing LSE/UCL above the same for postgrad is not so much about direct impact on employment prospects. For me I was more generally exposure to the law. London provides a lot more opportunities for those who actively seek them. For somene with no previous connections to the law, my first interactions with layers and judges was intimidating. Now I feel perfectly comfortable in Chambers, in courts, working with solicitors, doing research work for practitioners etc. I feel comfortable with both the environment and the people. I regularly attend public lectures on law related topics by high profile speakers from across the world. Non of these are things are anything to mention on cv or of direct benefit when it comes to applying for jobs. For me, these opportunities provide soft skills which make me a more confident person and more rounded too. It is experiences outside of the lectures/tutorials that matter most to me. I don't think I would have had as much exposure if I was not in London.

    If I was studying any other subject (medicine etc), I didn't think being in London provides any special advantage. But law is very London-centric (wrongly in my opinion).

    For anyone who wants a good education and a nice job at a big city law firm at the end of it, going to Bristol/Durham or London will make no difference. But for those who want maximum exposure to law, I think there is naturally more of it in London.
    Alright, that's fair enough. There are are of course courts, firms and presentation in cities like Bristol, Manchester and whatnot, but I do get what you mean...
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    (Original post by blackbluegreen)
    My reason for choosing KCL above Bristol and Durham at undergrad, and now choosing LSE/UCL above the same for postgrad is not so much about direct impact on employment prospects. For me I was more generally about exposure to the law. London provides a lot more opportunities for those who actively seek them. For someone with no previous connections to the law, my first interactions with lawyers and judges was intimidating. Now I feel perfectly comfortable in chambers, in courts, working with solicitors, doing research work for practitioners etc. I feel comfortable with both the environment and the people. I regularly attend public lectures on law related topics by high profile speakers from across the world. Non of these are things are anything to mention on cv or of direct benefit when it comes to applying for jobs. For me, these opportunities provide soft skills which make me a more confident person and more rounded too. It is experiences outside of the lectures/tutorials that matter most to me. I don't think I would have had as much exposure if I was not in London.

    If I was studying any other subject (medicine etc), I didn't think being in London provides any special advantage. But law is very London-centric (wrongly in my opinion).

    For anyone who wants a good education and a nice job at a big city law firm at the end of it, going to Bristol/Durham or London will make no difference. But for those who want maximum exposure to law, I think there is naturally more of it in London.
    Now this is what I call solid reasoning! Good post.

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    (Original post by *Stefan*)
    How did you get to that 85%? And what subject doesn't involve memorising?
    .
    If i even need to explain this to you then there's no point continuing. Jesus christ. You seem to be salty about the % estimate. But now that i think about it, it's more. How much of law ISN'T memorising from a book? A part is confidence and debating skills (aka saying your recall in outloud instead of writing). But most of what you're tested on is recall. Go on UCLs website and look at their course structure for law if you don't believe me.

    How anyone can bash another subject that's actually mentally challenging while ironically defending law is beyond me.


    Also I never said no subject doesn't have memorising so please read before spewing rubbish. But Law is one of the worst culprits when it comes to this. Might even be the worst. You'll still be screwed for English and History if all you've got is photographic memory and you're competent enough to apply it. But photographic memory for law? That's most of the degree and exams done. Far less intelligence is required to study law than computer science (the thing the guy was ******** on) Sitting in the library memorising is NOT the same as solving problems.

    Everyone i know who studies it has complained in the past about large parts of the course they could've done themselves without lectures by simply memorising text from the book.

    But hey, keep living in denial all you want lol
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    I'm imagining that OP may have had enough of us already, but here are my personal reasons as to why I applied to London:

    Reputation - the trio of LSE/UCL/King's may edge out Durham, Nottingham etc. ever so slightly in terms of internationl name recognition - which is important to me, as I'm considering moving to the US or Greece at some point in the future

    Family + Contacts - I know a couple of barristers in Temple, and I'm hoping that I can continue my shadowing/internship in chambers with them during the academic year (and hopefully meet new barristers through them along the way!). Plus, I've got a couple of second cousins studying in London atm, and one of them promised to "show me the ropes" (suggest how to get around, good places to eat or go out, etc)

    First Year Internships - I'm definitely applying for one of the Easter programmes they have for 1st years, and I'd like to avoid the hassle of having to book accommodation in another city while doing the internship, and simultaneously paying for my accommodation in the city where I'm studying (plus, I've hear great things about LSE's career office )

    Costs of Living aren't that much lower than in Oxford/Cambridge (which were the only viable non-London alternatives for me :3) - The only issue was accomodation costs (which are ~£7.5k for the first year compared to about £3k at the college that interviewed me), and my parents promised to chip in to cover the difference, so it's not really a priority...
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    (Original post by JohnGreek)
    I'm imagining that OP may have had enough of us already, but here are my personal reasons as to why I applied to London:

    Reputation - the trio of LSE/UCL/King's may edge out Durham, Nottingham etc. ever so slightly in terms of internationl name recognition - which is important to me, as I'm considering moving to the US or Greece at some point in the future

    Family + Contacts - I know a couple of barristers in Temple, and I'm hoping that I can continue my shadowing/internship in chambers with them during the academic year (and hopefully meet new barristers through them along the way!). Plus, I've got a couple of second cousins studying in London atm, and one of them promised to "show me the ropes" (suggest how to get around, good places to eat or go out, etc)

    First Year Internships - I'm definitely applying for one of the Easter programmes they have for 1st years, and I'd like to avoid the hassle of having to book accommodation in another city while doing the internship, and simultaneously paying for my accommodation in the city where I'm studying (plus, I've hear great things about LSE's career office )

    Costs of Living aren't that much lower than in Oxford/Cambridge (which were the only viable non-London alternatives for me :3) - The only issue was accomodation costs (which are ~£7.5k for the first year compared to about £3k at the college that interviewed me), and my parents promised to chip in to cover the difference, so it's not really a priority...
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    Aren't lower? You mean the they are lower. 7.5k to 3k is a significant jump. Durham/Bristol may be even cheaper.
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    School leavers are the only people who are interested in nebulous nonsense like 'reputation' of Unis and the idea that any firms obsess about 'which Uni' at this level.

    Why do you do this? Just make a decision about which Uni feels right for you, which town/city feels right and you can afford, and, most importantly, where you think you will actually get the required grades.. All of this 'my Uni is better that your Uni' is just so pointless.

    In the years to come your clients are not going to care which Uni you went to.
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    (Original post by returnmigrant)
    School leavers are the only people who are interested in nebulous nonsense like 'reputation' of Unis and the idea that any firms obsess about 'which Uni' at this level.

    Why do you do this? Just make a decision about which Uni feels right for you, which town/city feels right and you can afford, and, most importantly, where you think you will actually get the required grades.. All of this 'my Uni is better that your Uni' is just so pointless.

    In the years to come your clients are not going to care which Uni you went to.
    That's if they actually get a training contract in the first place to eventuall be able to have clients, of course


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    (Original post by Coreling)
    Aren't lower? You mean the they are lower. 7.5k to 3k is a significant jump. Durham/Bristol may be even cheaper.
    As long as it's my parents footing the premium for accommodation, I'm not inclined to let accommodation costs alone force me to go to a uni that I wouldn't enjoy going to (Durham). Besides, stuff like council tax and day-to-day expenses are worryingly high in Oxford, high enough to render the difference between it and London rather small.

    Comparison table (As you can see, the main difference is the cost of rent)
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    (Original post by JohnGreek)
    As long as it's my parents footing the premium for accommodation, I'm not inclined to let accommodation costs alone force me to go to a uni that I wouldn't enjoy going to (Durham). Besides, stuff like council tax and day-to-day expenses are worryingly high in Oxford, high enough to render the difference between it and London rather small.

    Comparison table (As you can see, the main difference is the cost of rent)
    Interesting table, I don't think it fully applies to students though as it seems to be comparing general living costs. Obviously some of those don't apply to students, or are altered like rent/food (subsidised by college/uni).A lot of parents won't contribute to accommodation costs so it is a very real concern for many (myself included). I don't think (in most cases) you get 10-15k extra value from a London degree vs a top regional uni, obviously your case is different as you've highlighted yourself.
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    I *know* law! Get the judge on his (or her) right side, and you have got it sussed?! He may even show you leniency in his sentence!
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    (Original post by oli19919)
    Is it worth going to UCL/LSE over Bristol/Durham due to having a slightly better reputation (and being closer to the larger firms), despite the more expensive living/housing costs?
    As an undergraduate I would go for Durham, personally. You'll have ample opportunity to experience London when you start work, if you intend to work there, and you'll be better able to do so because you'll be better funded (if your financial circumstances are similar to those of most students). Do your undergraduate degree somewhere pleasant and quiet and save the bustle and expense of London for later. The reputation differences between the universities you mention won't make a material difference to your ability to find the employment you want.
 
 
 
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