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    (Original post by Kindred)
    Sounds like CMHT is the adult equivalant. I bipassed all the nhs stuff through private so I wouldn't really know.

    Sounds like you're finally on the right track. Your cmht lady or (if you get one) support worker would be a little bit like therapy and will be able to work all that out with you, but they probably want to get you on meds asap. I went on meds while the therapy side was being sorted.

    Group therapy is basically like therapy school from my experience. I went to therapy in a hospital where some people lived and some just came for their sessions. It will be a bit different from place to place, but this is my experience:
    You have your 1to1 sessions with somebody who basically just tracs your progress and then group sessions. Group sessions are a small-ish group of people in a veguely simmilar situation and a therapist. In most, the therapist will to a bit of an intro and then open up to discussion. Some have more of a theme (like art and drama ones or CBT and some are more just talking). For me it was in a hospital and I spent the day a few times each week and had lunch there (so like school). It was great for me cos I got to socialise with people who were in a rough patch too and in a supportive environmnt. I even went out with a couple of the people I met there once so that was really nice.

    I'd ask about therapy when you see people if it's something you're interested in.
    What you got is probably not that different to the NHS, just probably with different names for everything.
    Yeh, I assume the cmht person/support worker will be the closest I get to therapy. When I was in camhs I went every week to see someone from there-I don't think it was a specific like therapy to teach me anything, more just a talk about what had happened that week to help me, as well as monitoring-there was a set of questions that I got asked every week. So, I'm assuming the CMHT person will do something similar to this.

    The meds got delayed, I went to GP today, and said like I here because the CMHT person told me to come to GP as soon as possible to get some medicine. He had no idea about what medicine they want me to have (well, being a GP he of course has ideas) but the CMHT had not sent him anything to update that I'd been or saying what to give me, so nothing he could do other than say phone them, and see if they can fax something telling him then he will just do a prescription without seeing me. So we phoned, they said 3 different medicines and can be any 1 of them, so then had to phone GP's to leave a message for the right doctor.

    I'm a bit worried because no-one ever explained what the medicine is, why i am getting given in, how it works, when to take it, how much to take.. etc. and now if the GP just does a prescription I will just get given it without knowing this kind of things. All I know is (from cmht) that they don't usually recommend it in people my age, and that it makes you worse before it makes you better. - not the 2 most useful bits of info... like, why do I care they don't normally do it for my age, that just makes me think 'oh help what is wrong with me, something serious if I am getting medicine when people my age don't normally'

    I don't ever want group therapy, or any counselling (had so much of that in the past from school etc, it just makes me really angry). I would think about trying something like art therapy if I got offered but would never ask for it!
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    (Original post by dipka)
    What you got is probably not that different to the NHS, just probably with different names for everything.
    Yeh, I assume the cmht person/support worker will be the closest I get to therapy. When I was in camhs I went every week to see someone from there-I don't think it was a specific like therapy to teach me anything, more just a talk about what had happened that week to help me, as well as monitoring-there was a set of questions that I got asked every week. So, I'm assuming the CMHT person will do something similar to this.

    The meds got delayed, I went to GP today, and said like I here because the CMHT person told me to come to GP as soon as possible to get some medicine. He had no idea about what medicine they want me to have (well, being a GP he of course has ideas) but the CMHT had not sent him anything to update that I'd been or saying what to give me, so nothing he could do other than say phone them, and see if they can fax something telling him then he will just do a prescription without seeing me. So we phoned, they said 3 different medicines and can be any 1 of them, so then had to phone GP's to leave a message for the right doctor.

    I'm a bit worried because no-one ever explained what the medicine is, why i am getting given in, how it works, when to take it, how much to take.. etc. and now if the GP just does a prescription I will just get given it without knowing this kind of things. All I know is (from cmht) that they don't usually recommend it in people my age, and that it makes you worse before it makes you better. - not the 2 most useful bits of info... like, why do I care they don't normally do it for my age, that just makes me think 'oh help what is wrong with me, something serious if I am getting medicine when people my age don't normally'

    I don't ever want group therapy, or any counselling (had so much of that in the past from school etc, it just makes me really angry). I would think about trying something like art therapy if I got offered but would never ask for it!
    I got put on meds when they wouldn't usually. It's mostly cos of age. Doesn't mean that you are really bad or anything scary, just that they think you will need a boost. I get really annoyed with therapy too. I found group better cos it wasn't all aimed at me, but there were still times I got really annoyed and I even walked ou once cos the guy annoyed me. it did me good though.

    Do you mind me asking what the meds they mentioned were? Don't worry about instrustions. It will say when/ how to take them and possible side effects with it and you can ask your cmht in your next session.

    You usually get a couple weeks of side effects when you start antidepressants (i assume that's what they'll be giving you) and then start feeling better in a few months. They can have some lasting side effects, but most of the nasty ones go in a few weeks and you can always change dosage or meds. Just tell your doc or cmht if you think something is off.
    The wait will give you a bit of time to get used to the idea of meds. Try looking it up online or posting a thread here asking about people's expeiences.
    I was kinda freaked out when I was put on citalopram (I was 17 and they said the same sort of things to me), but after a bit of annoyance with side effects it really helped. I was on them for about 2 years before i decided I was ready to come off. You usually take them for at least a few months after you're feeling better so it will last and you won't just go straight back to how you were. I was scared cos I knew some people were on them forever, but don't worry about that. You just take them until you're ready. It's a bit like taking antibiotics for an infection or something- it's to sort out the chemical imbalances going on so once that's done and you feel ready you can stop.
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    (Original post by Kindred)
    I got put on meds when they wouldn't usually. It's mostly cos of age. Doesn't mean that you are really bad or anything scary, just that they think you will need a boost. I get really annoyed with therapy too. I found group better cos it wasn't all aimed at me, but there were still times I got really annoyed and I even walked ou once cos the guy annoyed me. it did me good though.

    Do you mind me asking what the meds they mentioned were? Don't worry about instrustions. It will say when/ how to take them and possible side effects with it and you can ask your cmht in your next session.

    You usually get a couple weeks of side effects when you start antidepressants (i assume that's what they'll be giving you) and then start feeling better in a few months. They can have some lasting side effects, but most of the nasty ones go in a few weeks and you can always change dosage or meds. Just tell your doc or cmht if you think something is off.
    The wait will give you a bit of time to get used to the idea of meds. Try looking it up online or posting a thread here asking about people's expeiences.
    I was kinda freaked out when I was put on citalopram (I was 17 and they said the same sort of things to me), but after a bit of annoyance with side effects it really helped. I was on them for about 2 years before i decided I was ready to come off. You usually take them for at least a few months after you're feeling better so it will last and you won't just go straight back to how you were. I was scared cos I knew some people were on them forever, but don't worry about that. You just take them until you're ready. It's a bit like taking antibiotics for an infection or something- it's to sort out the chemical imbalances going on so once that's done and you feel ready you can stop.
    I don't understand how age makes any difference though because you can have mental health problems at any age. So, why does it matter what age you are what they usually recommend?

    Did therapy help you even though you get annoyed? I might need to remember that if I ever get asked about it, but no-one has yet.

    They said 3 possibly ones for medicine, I don't know which the GP will pick, but the 3 I know of now are Fluxetine, Citalapram, Sertraline.
    The not knowing when I will get it and start is annoying, I have got a week away next week, then 4 weeks to do 4 assessments in. I am already thinking I won't complete it because of all this going to appointments and worry makes doing work difficult. I don't need some medicine to make me worse than I am now.
    Meds got mentioned by a GP a month ago, maybe more so I've had since then to get the idea. It would have been great if I got the 2 bad weeks over easter or something, but then I had work due in this week I only just managed so that would not have worked either.

    I'm surprised that you chose yourself when to finish. I would think like they told me to get it now, they will tell me when to stop. Or I would hope so actually because I would not know how to work it out-the same with the sleep one. The earliest I have been to sleep this week is 3:30am, yet I can't work out the medicine. I can work out I got a problem, but not how to fix it. So I wouldn't want to have to decide about this.
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    (Original post by dipka)
    I don't understand how age makes any difference though because you can have mental health problems at any age. So, why does it matter what age you are what they usually recommend?

    Did therapy help you even though you get annoyed? I might need to remember that if I ever get asked about it, but no-one has yet.

    They said 3 possibly ones for medicine, I don't know which the GP will pick, but the 3 I know of now are Fluxetine, Citalapram, Sertraline.
    The not knowing when I will get it and start is annoying, I have got a week away next week, then 4 weeks to do 4 assessments in. I am already thinking I won't complete it because of all this going to appointments and worry makes doing work difficult. I don't need some medicine to make me worse than I am now.
    Meds got mentioned by a GP a month ago, maybe more so I've had since then to get the idea. It would have been great if I got the 2 bad weeks over easter or something, but then I had work due in this week I only just managed so that would not have worked either.

    I'm surprised that you chose yourself when to finish. I would think like they told me to get it now, they will tell me when to stop. Or I would hope so actually because I would not know how to work it out-the same with the sleep one. The earliest I have been to sleep this week is 3:30am, yet I can't work out the medicine. I can work out I got a problem, but not how to fix it. So I wouldn't want to have to decide about this.
    I think it has to do with a) drugs affecting children differently and b) people having an idea of teenagers being unstable and having "teenage angst" rather than actual problems. I can see why they do it, but it's certinally not always the case.
    I think non-aduls also need somebody other than a GP to advise meds before they can be given. I'm pretty sure I remember mine needing to be advised or prescribed by a psych rather than a gp.

    Therapy did help me yes. It annoyed me at times and I didn't always see at the time how it was helping but I can see now that it has. I think the meds made me stable enough to cope with therapy and the therapy helped me long term to recognise and avoid further issues. For me it also relly helped to be around others who were understanding. Some of my friends to start with were not at all supportive of me so I was scared to open up and be judged again. Next people I opened up to were really supportive though and i'm so glad I opened up and took that risk.

    It's kinda a joint decision between you and the GP/ other doc. I decided I wanted to come off them so I spoke to my psychiatrist and we made a plan (you need to ween off them usually so you don't get withdrawl). At the end of the day it depends on how you feel so you have most of the choice. They will advise you, but you have the choice to come off them whenever you want (though you should follow their advice) and they are unlikely to take you off them if you don't feel ready.

    If you are having trouble with work remember allowances can be made for things like this. It's best to talk to your college about it sooner rather than later, but you can tell them at any point if you are struggling. Things like DSA and extenuating circumstances can be discussed. I started my meds around exam time and I coped as well as I would have without them since i'd not done any work towards them anyway, but it can be a good idea to wait until there isn't much going on incase you feel rough. I got a few allowances like rest breaks and extra time because of my situation.

    I have experience with citalopram and think most are simmilar. Once you get past the side effects it's not bad. I just took one tablet a day and avoided alcohol and too much caffine. After a while it just becomes routine.
    I found that my sleep improved rather soon after starting them. Probably started improving a coupe of weeks after the withdrawl.
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    (Original post by Kindred)
    I think it has to do with a) drugs affecting children differently and b) people having an idea of teenagers being unstable and having "teenage angst" rather than actual problems. I can see why they do it, but it's certinally not always the case.
    I think non-aduls also need somebody other than a GP to advise meds before they can be given. I'm pretty sure I remember mine needing to be advised or prescribed by a psych rather than a gp.

    Therapy did help me yes. It annoyed me at times and I didn't always see at the time how it was helping but I can see now that it has. I think the meds made me stable enough to cope with therapy and the therapy helped me long term to recognise and avoid further issues. For me it also relly helped to be around others who were understanding. Some of my friends to start with were not at all supportive of me so I was scared to open up and be judged again. Next people I opened up to were really supportive though and i'm so glad I opened up and took that risk.

    It's kinda a joint decision between you and the GP/ other doc. I decided I wanted to come off them so I spoke to my psychiatrist and we made a plan (you need to ween off them usually so you don't get withdrawl). At the end of the day it depends on how you feel so you have most of the choice. They will advise you, but you have the choice to come off them whenever you want (though you should follow their advice) and they are unlikely to take you off them if you don't feel ready.

    If you are having trouble with work remember allowances can be made for things like this. It's best to talk to your college about it sooner rather than later, but you can tell them at any point if you are struggling. Things like DSA and extenuating circumstances can be discussed. I started my meds around exam time and I coped as well as I would have without them since i'd not done any work towards them anyway, but it can be a good idea to wait until there isn't much going on incase you feel rough. I got a few allowances like rest breaks and extra time because of my situation.

    I have experience with citalopram and think most are simmilar. Once you get past the side effects it's not bad. I just took one tablet a day and avoided alcohol and too much caffine. After a while it just becomes routine.
    I found that my sleep improved rather soon after starting them. Probably started improving a coupe of weeks after the withdrawl.
    I agree with a) That kind of makes sense. But, with b) this is doctors/professionals who are prescribing these not the general public, so should they not know the truth? Either way it doesn't affect me, for whatever reason I'm going to get one of the 3.
    That could be true too, that you need to be more trained to do something for someone under 18/16. For example I started having blood tests at 15 years 9 months and I needed a GP not a nurse because of not being 18. It was strange when I was 18 swapping to a nurse!

    So, medicine helps short term and therapy for the long term? Maybe that's why they not suggesting therapy yet, but I do think autism will affect therapy too. tbh I wouldn't be surprised if they go at some point you can't have therapy because their is no-one to do it who knows about autism. Almost discrimination really but if there's no-one then there's no-one.


    Uni know I'm struggling already, well they keep saying 'you can do it' and not really listening whenever I mention I'm worrying I won't finish 4 assessments in 4 weeks (which is what it is currently) or whatever the numbers have been.
    I don't have any exams, which is a shame because I do better in exams than anything else.
    I already get DSA so got loads of support workers and arrangements already. Oh, and it's not possible for me to get extra time because of this mental health stuff because I already get AED (assessed extended deadlines) from DSA. Yes their Is ECC (extenuating circumstances something? not sure exactly what it's called. but its where anyone can get apply for extra time for something like illness or bereavement) But it would need to be extra extreme for me because I already have AED. and if I'm honest the stress and effort of applying, getting evidence, waiting etc would be worse and waste so much time when I could just do the work (I hope!) Still worrying but I don't think ECC will be right for me.
    Typing this did just make me wonder if I could or should re apply for DSA because things have changed, and I now have a mental health problems too. I doubt I'd get much more support though, I seem to pretty much get everything, I've never seen anyone in the disabled students part in here getting more than me. But, I will think about asking the DA's next time I see them.


    Did you manage to take them regularly, or as your prescribed to? One of my current issues Is I'm not managing to take my regular medication I have for all the other medical stuff. so my first problem might be having another thing I need to take.... and then ending up not taking it just like anything else.


    Final thing to tell you, I'm away next week Monday-Friday, camping no computer so I won't reply to this. I will read and reply when I get back.I'm going with uni to the Lake District as part of my course. Looking forward to a week of not having to do any assessment work, or go to any kind of medical appointment. The two of those things will mean even if it's difficult, or I end up in pain with my knee I will make it a good week somehow.

    Edit-you might not know about my knee. in November I got injured by my support worker. I've been using crutches since then and having physio. The injury is apparently fixed, has been I think 6 ish weeks, so I am going through a process to not need crutches now. It's basically set myself mini targets of reducing the amount I use them gradually. It's just very slow, and very painful, but using my knee more is the only way it will get stronger again so I need the pain. This week will be a good opportunity for some pain, camping for a week and doing all kinds of activities will create pain!
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    (Original post by dipka)
    I agree with a) That kind of makes sense. But, with b) this is doctors/professionals who are prescribing these not the general public, so should they not know the truth? Either way it doesn't affect me, for whatever reason I'm going to get one of the 3.
    That could be true too, that you need to be more trained to do something for someone under 18/16. For example I started having blood tests at 15 years 9 months and I needed a GP not a nurse because of not being 18. It was strange when I was 18 swapping to a nurse!

    So, medicine helps short term and therapy for the long term? Maybe that's why they not suggesting therapy yet, but I do think autism will affect therapy too. tbh I wouldn't be surprised if they go at some point you can't have therapy because their is no-one to do it who knows about autism. Almost discrimination really but if there's no-one then there's no-one.


    Uni know I'm struggling already, well they keep saying 'you can do it' and not really listening whenever I mention I'm worrying I won't finish 4 assessments in 4 weeks (which is what it is currently) or whatever the numbers have been.
    I don't have any exams, which is a shame because I do better in exams than anything else.
    I already get DSA so got loads of support workers and arrangements already. Oh, and it's not possible for me to get extra time because of this mental health stuff because I already get AED (assessed extended deadlines) from DSA. Yes their Is ECC (extenuating circumstances something? not sure exactly what it's called. but its where anyone can get apply for extra time for something like illness or bereavement) But it would need to be extra extreme for me because I already have AED. and if I'm honest the stress and effort of applying, getting evidence, waiting etc would be worse and waste so much time when I could just do the work (I hope!) Still worrying but I don't think ECC will be right for me.
    Typing this did just make me wonder if I could or should re apply for DSA because things have changed, and I now have a mental health problems too. I doubt I'd get much more support though, I seem to pretty much get everything, I've never seen anyone in the disabled students part in here getting more than me. But, I will think about asking the DA's next time I see them.


    Did you manage to take them regularly, or as your prescribed to? One of my current issues Is I'm not managing to take my regular medication I have for all the other medical stuff. so my first problem might be having another thing I need to take.... and then ending up not taking it just like anything else.


    Final thing to tell you, I'm away next week Monday-Friday, camping no computer so I won't reply to this. I will read and reply when I get back.I'm going with uni to the Lake District as part of my course. Looking forward to a week of not having to do any assessment work, or go to any kind of medical appointment. The two of those things will mean even if it's difficult, or I end up in pain with my knee I will make it a good week somehow.

    Edit-you might not know about my knee. in November I got injured by my support worker. I've been using crutches since then and having physio. The injury is apparently fixed, has been I think 6 ish weeks, so I am going through a process to not need crutches now. It's basically set myself mini targets of reducing the amount I use them gradually. It's just very slow, and very painful, but using my knee more is the only way it will get stronger again so I need the pain. This week will be a good opportunity for some pain, camping for a week and doing all kinds of activities will create pain!
    Thing is it isn't completely untrue. Teenagers do have a bunch of hormones flying around messing things up and for a lot of them it's not too bad and doesn't last too long. It can also cause complications with medication since they also affect hormones. In general teenagers are more complicated than most adults.

    Autism shouldn't affect therapy too much. I mean yeah it will from your perspective, but most therapists will have some level of understanding about autism and certinally shouldn't turn you away on that basis. If they try to then you can pull the discrimination card and say they will have to find you somebody. It's like turning somebody in a wheelchair away because they don't have experience with PTSD caused by amputation. But I wouldn't expect it will be an issue. I was in therapy with people who had various levels of various conditions. I have ADD and Dyslexia and have to draw to keep focus in some situations. That did cause a little bit of an issue with one therapist (in group), but I explained that it is a coping mechanism for me and they were oksy with it. You might get a couple of little situations like that where you have to explain stuff, but therapy is an understanding environment. It reminds me of Alice in Wonderland- "we're all mad here". Everybody there has something the matter with them so it's normal.

    Pretty much yeah. Often you can get away with not taking meds and just going to therapy. You can get to a point were your brain chemicals (don't remember the actual words) are all out of balance so you need the meds to balance them out again though so meds do kinda help long term in that they sort out an issue that could make any attempts pretty useless. (I'm ignoring the cronic catagory where meds are needed long term since it's not really relevant to you).
    I would suggest that if they don't offer it you enquire about therapy at least to see what your options would be. I did various types of therapy at different stages. Sometimes you aren't ready for it and that's fine, but you could find it useful later so just never rue it out completely.

    As far as taking the meds goes it's not really that complicated. I had a messed up sleeping pattern so would take the tablets at random times rather than the "in the morning/ evening" which is usually said. I'd miss the odd day too. Didn't really matter much. If i'd missed two days i'd start feeling it a bit, but for me it wasn't too strict when I took them. It gets a lot better as you go on too since you get into a habbit of it and you have a bit of reserve in your system so if you miss a dose it doesn't matter too much. Alcohol would probably have been the worst thing (except I didn't often drink anyway). With pretty much all ADs you're told to avoid alchol. The odd drink won't matter with most as long as it isn't much, but it makes the effects of alcohol bigger. For me it meant that after hald a bottle of cider I practically passed out. It got less bad the longer I was on it, but I figured it wasn't worth it so just stopped drinking.
    Btw, that's my personal experience with citalopram so do check whatever you have thoroughly to be safe. Some have worse effects with alcohol etc.

    It's worth re-applying. I did when I was diagnosed with ADD (was for depression and OCD before that) and I got more. If nothing else it just means they can check everything is right. You may not get anything more bu they might just fiddle things around a little to help. At uni I got help with expenses (housing, transport and supplies), seperate room/ reader/ scribe, person to talk to about mh stuff, study helper, printed copies of lecture slides (on coloured paper for my dyslexia) and a few other bits. It got fiddled around at times to better suit me. The people got merged into the same cos i didn't like having to go to two meetings a week since I was tired enough already. The printouts got changed to coloured glasses (and I could print the slides cos my lecturers sent them to me). The expenses were worked out so they were for the things I needed most since there is a cap. I got help with housing costs and a new printer since I got paper etc from my brother who'd just left uni and books from my parents. When my bf moved in I couldn't claim for the housing anymore so that got changed to transport costs to placements. The reader/ scribe was added after my dyslexia/ ADD were diagnosed and I had coloured printouts of exams too so I could do it myself if I wanted.
    Things change and after having support for a while you get to see what bits fit and what bits don't. Even different courses can mean different support so it's always worth updating.

    Sucks about your leg. Hope you're getting all the help you need for that.
    Have fun camping! Be sure to remember anything that may help with the pain and to tell people if you need to take it easy.
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    (Original post by Kindred)
    Thing is it isn't completely untrue. Teenagers do have a bunch of hormones flying around messing things up and for a lot of them it's not too bad and doesn't last too long. It can also cause complications with medication since they also affect hormones. In general teenagers are more complicated than most adults.

    Autism shouldn't affect therapy too much. I mean yeah it will from your perspective, but most therapists will have some level of understanding about autism and certinally shouldn't turn you away on that basis. If they try to then you can pull the discrimination card and say they will have to find you somebody. It's like turning somebody in a wheelchair away because they don't have experience with PTSD caused by amputation. But I wouldn't expect it will be an issue. I was in therapy with people who had various levels of various conditions. I have ADD and Dyslexia and have to draw to keep focus in some situations. That did cause a little bit of an issue with one therapist (in group), but I explained that it is a coping mechanism for me and they were oksy with it. You might get a couple of little situations like that where you have to explain stuff, but therapy is an understanding environment. It reminds me of Alice in Wonderland- "we're all mad here". Everybody there has something the matter with them so it's normal.

    Pretty much yeah. Often you can get away with not taking meds and just going to therapy. You can get to a point were your brain chemicals (don't remember the actual words) are all out of balance so you need the meds to balance them out again though so meds do kinda help long term in that they sort out an issue that could make any attempts pretty useless. (I'm ignoring the cronic catagory where meds are needed long term since it's not really relevant to you).
    I would suggest that if they don't offer it you enquire about therapy at least to see what your options would be. I did various types of therapy at different stages. Sometimes you aren't ready for it and that's fine, but you could find it useful later so just never rue it out completely.

    As far as taking the meds goes it's not really that complicated. I had a messed up sleeping pattern so would take the tablets at random times rather than the "in the morning/ evening" which is usually said. I'd miss the odd day too. Didn't really matter much. If i'd missed two days i'd start feeling it a bit, but for me it wasn't too strict when I took them. It gets a lot better as you go on too since you get into a habbit of it and you have a bit of reserve in your system so if you miss a dose it doesn't matter too much. Alcohol would probably have been the worst thing (except I didn't often drink anyway). With pretty much all ADs you're told to avoid alchol. The odd drink won't matter with most as long as it isn't much, but it makes the effects of alcohol bigger. For me it meant that after hald a bottle of cider I practically passed out. It got less bad the longer I was on it, but I figured it wasn't worth it so just stopped drinking.
    Btw, that's my personal experience with citalopram so do check whatever you have thoroughly to be safe. Some have worse effects with alcohol etc.

    It's worth re-applying. I did when I was diagnosed with ADD (was for depression and OCD before that) and I got more. If nothing else it just means they can check everything is right. You may not get anything more bu they might just fiddle things around a little to help. At uni I got help with expenses (housing, transport and supplies), seperate room/ reader/ scribe, person to talk to about mh stuff, study helper, printed copies of lecture slides (on coloured paper for my dyslexia) and a few other bits. It got fiddled around at times to better suit me. The people got merged into the same cos i didn't like having to go to two meetings a week since I was tired enough already. The printouts got changed to coloured glasses (and I could print the slides cos my lecturers sent them to me). The expenses were worked out so they were for the things I needed most since there is a cap. I got help with housing costs and a new printer since I got paper etc from my brother who'd just left uni and books from my parents. When my bf moved in I couldn't claim for the housing anymore so that got changed to transport costs to placements. The reader/ scribe was added after my dyslexia/ ADD were diagnosed and I had coloured printouts of exams too so I could do it myself if I wanted.
    Things change and after having support for a while you get to see what bits fit and what bits don't. Even different courses can mean different support so it's always worth updating.

    Sucks about your leg. Hope you're getting all the help you need for that.
    Have fun camping! Be sure to remember anything that may help with the pain and to tell people if you need to take it easy.
    I'm back

    Went to pharmacy yesterday and they had the medicine ready (amazed their was no issues in between my message to GP, Them doing a prescription, sending to pharmacy, pharmacy ordering.. somewhere there is usually issues even for my other regular stuff) It's different to yours. Prozep 20mg/5ml (Fluoxetine) and I'm taking 5ml a day. it says time of day and food does not matter but mum said do it at night so I just done what she said and I've had 2 doses now.

    I'm confused by why I got it, and annoyed that no-one explained it. The leaflet says it is for depression, disorders characterised by obsessive-compulsive actions, and eating disorder called bulimia nervosa.
    I never got told any kind of diagnosis, and I don't think I have any of those things. I might be wrong but It's not obvious to me now which 1 it is.
    But, all I can do is take it and see what happens, and wait till I got either GP or CMHT whichever is next first and try and ask.



    It's easy to say about discrimination but a lot harder in reality. A good example is i'm trying to go sailing in summer, 1 organisation is saying it consideres autism a learning disability so I need some kind of visit and assessment and a known buddy to be safe and able to go. First autism alone is not a learning disability (although I admit for me I may not have a diagnosed learning disability, but i'm very in the middle of yes and no to the point I can usually make myself either yes or no to whatever is best), second I'm in uni-it's not like I am learning disabled so much I unable to understand safety instructions!!! 3rd. I been sailing before, got some qualifications and have never had these issues before and 4th, you clam to include all, but I have autism, I don't have friends so I got no-one to be a buddy. Even from a disability specialist company you get issues of them not understanding. I can't expect anyone else to have a clue. And they don't. their is so many stories of health professionals not understanding autism despite how common it is, so really it seems unlikely to find a therapist who understands.

    With most things I try and be willing to try them once (like new groups, or having medicine for this) but with all my past experience i'm less willing to do therapy, especially if it's more waiting and unknown and like the medicine I get sent some new scary place without knowing why.

    One of my current issues has been not taking me medicines though, so now I've got this one it's another one to remember/need motivation to do. At least it tastes alright (peppermint) so I don't actually mind taking it. Will have to see how I do when I'm back in uni next week though.
    alcohol won't be a problem for me. Never drink it anyway.

    I haden;t thought that they might change DSA to make it what's most useful to me now. I'm already at the limit (or over, my uni is already paying the extra DSA don't cover I believe) on the none-medical helpers (there's loads.. study assistant, specialist study skills, specialist mentor, proof reader, Examination support worker) and I get allowance for paper/ink already too. I got equipment at the start, and I've asked to get this app for students with autism hopefully for next year but not sure what's happening with that.
    But, I think your right and I should talk to the DA's and see if it would be worth getting it re-assessed to see if things could be changed.
    Do you know what evidence I would need about this mental health stuff for DSA? and how to get it?
    And, do you know what you get from DSA if you just had mental health problems? I'm wondering if I basically get that already anyway and so there is not much point in going through the process again.

    Yours getting changed to be 1 thing rather than 2 meetings a week sounds brilliant! It's taken me all year to get used to different people all do different things and I need to learn who does what and ask the correct person about things. Outside of lectures I've got 3 regular meetings from DSA a week, then another 2 not directly from DSA but yeh, proof reader and exam support is less often-like only if I have an exam or anything to proof read! That's before you add in all the hours I am in lessons and getting support.


    I'd already gone before you wrote that, and I can't take any extra painkillers because I'm already on prescription painkillers for something else. But, it was great. Rainy and very muddy which meant I heard so much of others complaining but It was great to be away from everything for a week.
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    (Original post by dipka)
    I'm back

    Went to pharmacy yesterday and they had the medicine ready (amazed their was no issues in between my message to GP, Them doing a prescription, sending to pharmacy, pharmacy ordering.. somewhere there is usually issues even for my other regular stuff) It's different to yours. Prozep 20mg/5ml (Fluoxetine) and I'm taking 5ml a day. it says time of day and food does not matter but mum said do it at night so I just done what she said and I've had 2 doses now.

    I'm confused by why I got it, and annoyed that no-one explained it. The leaflet says it is for depression, disorders characterised by obsessive-compulsive actions, and eating disorder called bulimia nervosa.
    I never got told any kind of diagnosis, and I don't think I have any of those things. I might be wrong but It's not obvious to me now which 1 it is.
    But, all I can do is take it and see what happens, and wait till I got either GP or CMHT whichever is next first and try and ask.



    It's easy to say about discrimination but a lot harder in reality. A good example is i'm trying to go sailing in summer, 1 organisation is saying it consideres autism a learning disability so I need some kind of visit and assessment and a known buddy to be safe and able to go. First autism alone is not a learning disability (although I admit for me I may not have a diagnosed learning disability, but i'm very in the middle of yes and no to the point I can usually make myself either yes or no to whatever is best), second I'm in uni-it's not like I am learning disabled so much I unable to understand safety instructions!!! 3rd. I been sailing before, got some qualifications and have never had these issues before and 4th, you clam to include all, but I have autism, I don't have friends so I got no-one to be a buddy. Even from a disability specialist company you get issues of them not understanding. I can't expect anyone else to have a clue. And they don't. their is so many stories of health professionals not understanding autism despite how common it is, so really it seems unlikely to find a therapist who understands.

    With most things I try and be willing to try them once (like new groups, or having medicine for this) but with all my past experience i'm less willing to do therapy, especially if it's more waiting and unknown and like the medicine I get sent some new scary place without knowing why.

    One of my current issues has been not taking me medicines though, so now I've got this one it's another one to remember/need motivation to do. At least it tastes alright (peppermint) so I don't actually mind taking it. Will have to see how I do when I'm back in uni next week though.
    alcohol won't be a problem for me. Never drink it anyway.

    I haden;t thought that they might change DSA to make it what's most useful to me now. I'm already at the limit (or over, my uni is already paying the extra DSA don't cover I believe) on the none-medical helpers (there's loads.. study assistant, specialist study skills, specialist mentor, proof reader, Examination support worker) and I get allowance for paper/ink already too. I got equipment at the start, and I've asked to get this app for students with autism hopefully for next year but not sure what's happening with that.
    But, I think your right and I should talk to the DA's and see if it would be worth getting it re-assessed to see if things could be changed.
    Do you know what evidence I would need about this mental health stuff for DSA? and how to get it?
    And, do you know what you get from DSA if you just had mental health problems? I'm wondering if I basically get that already anyway and so there is not much point in going through the process again.

    Yours getting changed to be 1 thing rather than 2 meetings a week sounds brilliant! It's taken me all year to get used to different people all do different things and I need to learn who does what and ask the correct person about things. Outside of lectures I've got 3 regular meetings from DSA a week, then another 2 not directly from DSA but yeh, proof reader and exam support is less often-like only if I have an exam or anything to proof read! That's before you add in all the hours I am in lessons and getting support.


    I'd already gone before you wrote that, and I can't take any extra painkillers because I'm already on prescription painkillers for something else. But, it was great. Rainy and very muddy which meant I heard so much of others complaining but It was great to be away from everything for a week.
    Glad you had a good time

    When I got an assesment just for mh things I didn't really get anything in the way of funding. I got meetings with a support worker of some sort and allowances for if I was feeling bad (like if I was late for lectures or missed a few). All you need is a note from your doctor confirming your issues. Since you already qualify for DSA you may not need that. I'd check with your student support service.

    Discrimination is annoying. I'm lucky that my issues aren't seen in the same way as things like autism etc and people don't judge as much, but it's still annoying even for me. I do a course involving teaching and childcare and it annoys me how little even our teachers understand about it. We hardly ever covered mh issues (just a passing comment) and they don't really cover special needs either. With me having some and working with special needs children for a short time I have some understanding of special needs and I always ended up sitting getting fed up in lectures with how poorly they cover it.
    How they treated me was completely different to what they were teaching us and I even had harsh comments on a course fb group which hardly got dealt with. I think people don't realise that people with special needs can still act and seem like everybody else and you may not know they have any special needs. They assume that people with them are less capable when in most cases its just that environments aren't suited to them. They never seem to realise that there's a scale either and you can be high functioning with the same special needs as somebody who is low functioning. I've listened to two people (with experience of special needs) arguing over how people with a specific special need act. They should have known better considering one of them worked with children with special needs. All people are individual even if they have disabilities or special needs!
    Anyway enough ranting.

    The packet will say what it is for, but iit can also be used for other things. Your doctor may not want to diagnose you because they don't want to label you.
    I suggest either before you go to bed or when you wake up and having it with some food to start with to help if you get nauseous with it (lining your stomach a bit). I took mine when I woke up cos it affected my sleeping a little to start with.

    Well anyway welcome back and good luck with the meds and treatment
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    (Original post by Kindred)
    Glad you had a good time

    When I got an assesment just for mh things I didn't really get anything in the way of funding. I got meetings with a support worker of some sort and allowances for if I was feeling bad (like if I was late for lectures or missed a few). All you need is a note from your doctor confirming your issues. Since you already qualify for DSA you may not need that. I'd check with your student support service.

    Discrimination is annoying. I'm lucky that my issues aren't seen in the same way as things like autism etc and people don't judge as much, but it's still annoying even for me. I do a course involving teaching and childcare and it annoys me how little even our teachers understand about it. We hardly ever covered mh issues (just a passing comment) and they don't really cover special needs either. With me having some and working with special needs children for a short time I have some understanding of special needs and I always ended up sitting getting fed up in lectures with how poorly they cover it.
    How they treated me was completely different to what they were teaching us and I even had harsh comments on a course fb group which hardly got dealt with. I think people don't realise that people with special needs can still act and seem like everybody else and you may not know they have any special needs. They assume that people with them are less capable when in most cases its just that environments aren't suited to them. They never seem to realise that there's a scale either and you can be high functioning with the same special needs as somebody who is low functioning. I've listened to two people (with experience of special needs) arguing over how people with a specific special need act. They should have known better considering one of them worked with children with special needs. All people are individual even if they have disabilities or special needs!
    Anyway enough ranting.

    The packet will say what it is for, but iit can also be used for other things. Your doctor may not want to diagnose you because they don't want to label you.
    I suggest either before you go to bed or when you wake up and having it with some food to start with to help if you get nauseous with it (lining your stomach a bit). I took mine when I woke up cos it affected my sleeping a little to start with.

    Well anyway welcome back and good luck with the meds and treatment
    I think asking is the best way to go, I'm meeting the disability advisor on Wednesday so will try remember to ask then.

    I think any 'hidden' condition is judged, learning difficulty, learning disability, mental health conditions, developmental conditions. Their all things that unless you are affected by one in some way no-one understands. If you've got any one of these i'd say you will get judged/discriminated at some point in life. The more you have the worse it gets.

    I had that issue at school, even in primary school teachers knew I was 'different' (I got LOTS of tests for dyslexia) but they failed to do anything else after they were always inconclusive-other than wait a year or 2 and test again. Mum remembers me then more than I do and is always saying something I used to do as a child is a symptom of autism and how obvious it is now. If only the teachers had know more about autism, I might of got diagnosed earlier.
    I'm doing a course on outdoor activities, and I am amazed at how little disability is mentioned-it's not been yet.. I did the same subject at college and they only mentioned disability because I wanted to tell the class about autism so they understood me. I did a literature review about disability in the outdoors and the lack of research/education just gets worse..

    Nothing wrong with a nice rant every so often, all what you said is true. so I don't need to add much but with autism their is a reason it's full name is 'Autism Spectrum Disorder' because it is a spectrum and everyone with autism is so very different.. but no-one understands.

    Should someone not have to explain something about like what it is, how it works, why I have it for any new medicines? even if they are not giving a diagnosis for that reason.
    Although actually now I seem to just collect medical conditions, so 1 extra one won't be an issue if it helps me understand what's happening. I mean, I've got 11 things already, and I just had to put 'reason unknown' in the condition column on my medical info so I could put this new medicine on-a name or something would be better than that.
    I still find it strange that like 5 years ago I had basically nothing, oh just some cream for eczema, and allergic to plasters. now, it's 11 things.. and a 4 page medical document which will become 5 if I get info about this to put on.

    How did yours affect sleeping? the first 2 days my sleep was good (well for me, and reasonable to anyone else) tonight, it's 1am and I am still awake. That might be coming back to halls after being away last week, and having things I need to do before I go to uni tomorrow as well as needing to unpack but I don't know.
    This has just reminded me I've not done any medicine tonight though, so I am going to send this and go do it all while I remember.
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    (Original post by dipka)
    I think asking is the best way to go, I'm meeting the disability advisor on Wednesday so will try remember to ask then.

    I think any 'hidden' condition is judged, learning difficulty, learning disability, mental health conditions, developmental conditions. Their all things that unless you are affected by one in some way no-one understands. If you've got any one of these i'd say you will get judged/discriminated at some point in life. The more you have the worse it gets.

    I had that issue at school, even in primary school teachers knew I was 'different' (I got LOTS of tests for dyslexia) but they failed to do anything else after they were always inconclusive-other than wait a year or 2 and test again. Mum remembers me then more than I do and is always saying something I used to do as a child is a symptom of autism and how obvious it is now. If only the teachers had know more about autism, I might of got diagnosed earlier.
    I'm doing a course on outdoor activities, and I am amazed at how little disability is mentioned-it's not been yet.. I did the same subject at college and they only mentioned disability because I wanted to tell the class about autism so they understood me. I did a literature review about disability in the outdoors and the lack of research/education just gets worse..

    Nothing wrong with a nice rant every so often, all what you said is true. so I don't need to add much but with autism their is a reason it's full name is 'Autism Spectrum Disorder' because it is a spectrum and everyone with autism is so very different.. but no-one understands.

    Should someone not have to explain something about like what it is, how it works, why I have it for any new medicines? even if they are not giving a diagnosis for that reason.
    Although actually now I seem to just collect medical conditions, so 1 extra one won't be an issue if it helps me understand what's happening. I mean, I've got 11 things already, and I just had to put 'reason unknown' in the condition column on my medical info so I could put this new medicine on-a name or something would be better than that.
    I still find it strange that like 5 years ago I had basically nothing, oh just some cream for eczema, and allergic to plasters. now, it's 11 things.. and a 4 page medical document which will become 5 if I get info about this to put on.

    How did yours affect sleeping? the first 2 days my sleep was good (well for me, and reasonable to anyone else) tonight, it's 1am and I am still awake. That might be coming back to halls after being away last week, and having things I need to do before I go to uni tomorrow as well as needing to unpack but I don't know.
    This has just reminded me I've not done any medicine tonight though, so I am going to send this and go do it all while I remember.
    My mum's the same. She (and I) look back now on things and it's so clear. I was probably better off with it unknown for that time though. I think if school had known i'd just be dumped in more special classes and ignored.
    I have real issues looking back on a group my school dumped me in. It was meant to help people with social issues and to me it seems they were just trying to teach me how to hide who I was. I was a bit of a tom-boy since I had an older brother and was into outdoor stuff. They had a boy and girl group so I was stuck having my hair and nails done and doing ice breakers that almost made me feel more awkward. It was a different time and tere wasn't as muck knowledge about being different I guess. It's a bit better in most of the schools I look at. Sometimes I still get shocked at poor treatment, but usually it's good.

    I've had mystery problems for years now. I think i'm finally starting to get to the bottom of things now and people do take me more seriously now that I a) have some named conditions to call on and b) have actually started being tested properly (including surgery) for things. I think untill then people have just seen it as me being whiny.

    I guess where you're seeing two people both thought the other would explain. I find it gets awkward when im seeing multiple people. They may not be diagnosing because you already have diagnosed issues and they are atributing the issues to those. I'd suggest you ask about all of this and see (if you want one) if they would diagnose you or at least give you some more info. You can say you need extra info to help with the DSA if you like. It may help prompt them. I'd deffinately ask about the meds. It's a bit of a difficult thing to cope with sometimes so it does help to be clear about everything.

    My sleep was messed up before the tablets. I'd have real troubble getting to sleep and get more anxious at night. Thats when most of the worst thoughts happened for me. I got some odd dreams and an episode of sleep paralysis (or something like it at least) when I started. I also started randomly crying some nights before bed. It didn't last very long, but it was rather annoying.

    My sleep is all messed up now cos of some thyroid issues and stuff. Just started meds for that and i thinkit's messing with my emotions. I'm all over the place crying and getting upset for no reason. I'm so bored with everything too. Think i'll need to talk to the doc about that. Given my history I don't want to risk triggering anything. No way I'm going back to years more depression and stuff!

    Well i'm glad the meds seem okay for you so far. My first couple of days ere aweful. I threw up at college and felt really ill.
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    (Original post by Kindred)
    My mum's the same. She (and I) look back now on things and it's so clear. I was probably better off with it unknown for that time though. I think if school had known i'd just be dumped in more special classes and ignored.
    I have real issues looking back on a group my school dumped me in. It was meant to help people with social issues and to me it seems they were just trying to teach me how to hide who I was. I was a bit of a tom-boy since I had an older brother and was into outdoor stuff. They had a boy and girl group so I was stuck having my hair and nails done and doing ice breakers that almost made me feel more awkward. It was a different time and tere wasn't as muck knowledge about being different I guess. It's a bit better in most of the schools I look at. Sometimes I still get shocked at poor treatment, but usually it's good.

    I've had mystery problems for years now. I think i'm finally starting to get to the bottom of things now and people do take me more seriously now that I a) have some named conditions to call on and b) have actually started being tested properly (including surgery) for things. I think untill then people have just seen it as me being whiny.

    I guess where you're seeing two people both thought the other would explain. I find it gets awkward when im seeing multiple people. They may not be diagnosing because you already have diagnosed issues and they are atributing the issues to those. I'd suggest you ask about all of this and see (if you want one) if they would diagnose you or at least give you some more info. You can say you need extra info to help with the DSA if you like. It may help prompt them. I'd deffinately ask about the meds. It's a bit of a difficult thing to cope with sometimes so it does help to be clear about everything.

    My sleep was messed up before the tablets. I'd have real troubble getting to sleep and get more anxious at night. Thats when most of the worst thoughts happened for me. I got some odd dreams and an episode of sleep paralysis (or something like it at least) when I started. I also started randomly crying some nights before bed. It didn't last very long, but it was rather annoying.

    My sleep is all messed up now cos of some thyroid issues and stuff. Just started meds for that and i thinkit's messing with my emotions. I'm all over the place crying and getting upset for no reason. I'm so bored with everything too. Think i'll need to talk to the doc about that. Given my history I don't want to risk triggering anything. No way I'm going back to years more depression and stuff!

    Well i'm glad the meds seem okay for you so far. My first couple of days ere aweful. I threw up at college and felt really ill.
    That's good then if you prefer not to know. I think if I got diagnosed earlier school could have supported me better and done the right things to help.
    I know what you mean about schools 'trying to help' some of the stuff mine tried was really stupid too.
    That's a shame about having boys and girls separate-why is that? Do they think boys can't be friends with girls or the other way round or something?
    Are you still outdoorsy now? I'm outdoorsy to the point of doing my degree in Outdoor Adventure and wanting to be an instructor as a career. I've just now realised I've never asked what course/level you are, or any kind of general info?

    I had that at school, without any diagnosis I could not get any full or formal support-so getting a diagnosis of anything was a big thing because people finally knew their was something wrong and more importantly what that was. It was also great for me to be able to go something like " yes you stupid people, this is what I have and I told you all the things you tried won't work. Do you believe me now?" which was quite enjoyable somehow.

    That's the problem with it being between 2 people. Out of the 2 I see the GP next on Thursday so yes will ask him these kind of things and see what happens.

    I'm the same with sleep, been a mess for months, I've not noticed any side affects from this new thing though which is good. I know because of autism my body's quite different and I react different to stuff, in this case the difference is that where so much things mean I am unlikely to get a bad reaction and I actually have nothing. That's what I'm thinking anyway, either way I'm not complaining.

    What I am annoyed about is that today I find out that 1 of my other meds for another unrelated condition is being increased. It's like their is always something wrong with me.. and it's just another complication for me to deal with when taking meds to now remember to take twice the amount of this one!
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    (Original post by dipka)
    That's good then if you prefer not to know. I think if I got diagnosed earlier school could have supported me better and done the right things to help.
    I know what you mean about schools 'trying to help' some of the stuff mine tried was really stupid too.
    That's a shame about having boys and girls separate-why is that? Do they think boys can't be friends with girls or the other way round or something?
    Are you still outdoorsy now? I'm outdoorsy to the point of doing my degree in Outdoor Adventure and wanting to be an instructor as a career. I've just now realised I've never asked what course/level you are, or any kind of general info?

    I had that at school, without any diagnosis I could not get any full or formal support-so getting a diagnosis of anything was a big thing because people finally knew their was something wrong and more importantly what that was. It was also great for me to be able to go something like " yes you stupid people, this is what I have and I told you all the things you tried won't work. Do you believe me now?" which was quite enjoyable somehow.

    That's the problem with it being between 2 people. Out of the 2 I see the GP next on Thursday so yes will ask him these kind of things and see what happens.

    I'm the same with sleep, been a mess for months, I've not noticed any side affects from this new thing though which is good. I know because of autism my body's quite different and I react different to stuff, in this case the difference is that where so much things mean I am unlikely to get a bad reaction and I actually have nothing. That's what I'm thinking anyway, either way I'm not complaining.

    What I am annoyed about is that today I find out that 1 of my other meds for another unrelated condition is being increased. It's like their is always something wrong with me.. and it's just another complication for me to deal with when taking meds to now remember to take twice the amount of this one!
    I find having a diagnosis helps. It helps for me having a reason and I think it makes people take it more seriously too.
    I guess they thought boys would intimidate girls or something. I got on better with boys though tbh.

    I even had a counselor once that told me i didn't have OCD (I brought it up breifly cos I was concerned). I'd hardly mentioned why I was concerned yet and she just said no. I stopped seeing her after that. Turns out I dis have ocd too. Got a diagnosis for that and depression when I saw a psychiatrist. Once you see a doc and get a diagnosis nobody can tell you it's in your head or anything anymore.

    I think I would be more outdoorsy if I wasn't too exhausted to leave the house now. I enjoy climbing and things and I was doing canoeing for DofE before I had to drop out. I would love to be able to go for bike rides and things with my bf or even just sit in the park. Hopefully I can soo
    Used to do scouts and things so got to do a lot outside and my grandad was great at boating so I got to go out on his boat as a kid. I think it's in my blood :P

    I would be in my final year of uni, but I dropped out of one in my first year and now i'm having to drop out of another in my second after many issues.

    Glad your meds are going well and you don't have any side effects.
    I know the feeling with meds. I think my record is 7 tablets a day and it keeps chaging. I'm starting to loose track. :P
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    I find having a diagnosis helps. It helps for me having a reason and I think it makes people take it more seriously too.
    I guess they thought boys would intimidate girls or something. I got on better with boys though tbh.

    I even had a counselor once that told me i didn't have OCD (I brought it up breifly cos I was concerned). I'd hardly mentioned why I was concerned yet and she just said no. I stopped seeing her after that. Turns out I dis have ocd too. Got a diagnosis for that and depression when I saw a psychiatrist. Once you see a doc and get a diagnosis nobody can tell you it's in your head or anything anymore.

    I think I would be more outdoorsy if I wasn't too exhausted to leave the house now. I enjoy climbing and things and I was doing canoeing for DofE before I had to drop out. I would love to be able to go for bike rides and things with my bf or even just sit in the park. Hopefully I can soo
    Used to do scouts and things so got to do a lot outside and my grandad was great at boating so I got to go out on his boat as a kid. I think it's in my blood :P

    I would be in my final year of uni, but I dropped out of one in my first year and now i'm having to drop out of another in my second after many issues.

    Glad your meds are going well and you don't have any side effects.
    I know the feeling with meds. I think my record is 7 tablets a day and it keeps chaging. I'm starting to loose track. :P
    There's lots of people write about weather to diagnose or not, and then secondly whether to tell the person or not. Personally I believe you should to both because there's no benefit to no-one knowing and everyone just being confused forever like happened to me thought school. But there's lots of people that think diagnosis is a bad thing, I just wouldn't expect those people to be doctors tho..

    I had loads of counselling in school, and had loads of issues with it too. for me it just doesn't work and I refuse to see a counsellor even now. I'm not surprised you had them say that, I had them say all kinds of bad things to me, 1 I really remember is one of them saying they won't help me because I am beyond help.. but they then decided to refer me to another counsellor anyway. I got through I think something like 18, because of the 'only allowed to see you for 6 weeks/6 sessions' rule, so the whole thing was pointless because I won't trust anyone or them get to know me or achieve anything in that short a time. But once I was in the system, I was stuck in it a long time. By the end I just gave up saying anything and would just see it as skipping a lesson I don't like to have ac hat about TV, recent news, anything other than any kind of issue-which is why In the end they finally stopped it because I was 'wasting their time' (so seeing 18 or so people was a good use of my time, think of how many lessons and how much learning I missed..)

    Have you been told it is in your head? I've never really had anyone say that thankfully but I suppose it took time to convince them something is wrong which is similar.

    We sound similar, different outdoor things but it's all outdoorsy. I love sailing, my other choices would be kayaking/canoeing, walking or skiing. Don't like climbing or biking, probably because they are so difficult for me.

    Why do you have to drop out of DofE and uni courses?

    I can't do tablets, I wish I could take them because it would be so much easier than everything being liquid. So I don't have a number of tablets record.
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    (Original post by dipka)
    There's lots of people write about weather to diagnose or not, and then secondly whether to tell the person or not. Personally I believe you should to both because there's no benefit to no-one knowing and everyone just being confused forever like happened to me thought school. But there's lots of people that think diagnosis is a bad thing, I just wouldn't expect those people to be doctors tho..

    I had loads of counselling in school, and had loads of issues with it too. for me it just doesn't work and I refuse to see a counsellor even now. I'm not surprised you had them say that, I had them say all kinds of bad things to me, 1 I really remember is one of them saying they won't help me because I am beyond help.. but they then decided to refer me to another counsellor anyway. I got through I think something like 18, because of the 'only allowed to see you for 6 weeks/6 sessions' rule, so the whole thing was pointless because I won't trust anyone or them get to know me or achieve anything in that short a time. But once I was in the system, I was stuck in it a long time. By the end I just gave up saying anything and would just see it as skipping a lesson I don't like to have ac hat about TV, recent news, anything other than any kind of issue-which is why In the end they finally stopped it because I was 'wasting their time' (so seeing 18 or so people was a good use of my time, think of how many lessons and how much learning I missed..)

    Have you been told it is in your head? I've never really had anyone say that thankfully but I suppose it took time to convince them something is wrong which is similar.

    We sound similar, different outdoor things but it's all outdoorsy. I love sailing, my other choices would be kayaking/canoeing, walking or skiing. Don't like climbing or biking, probably because they are so difficult for me.

    Why do you have to drop out of DofE and uni courses?

    I can't do tablets, I wish I could take them because it would be so much easier than everything being liquid. So I don't have a number of tablets record.
    The problem isn't with diagnosis though, it's with stigma related to the condition.
    I think you should get told at least if they do think there is something to diagnose. Otherwise you're like me and haev to list a whole load of symptoms when people ask your medical history instead of just saying the diagnosis. Not just that but sometimes (like with dsa and things) you need the evidence.
    I can understand it if they're bordeline and they don't feel it's an issue, but if im concerned about it I should get answers if there are any.
    Like my brother may have ADHD, but it isn't an issue for him so he's never looked into it. I have difficulty with it though so for me it really helped to know.

    I know wha you mean. I never opened up to people quickly and it was even harder for me after so many people told me I had no problem. The only person I felt I could fully open up to for a while was my psych cos he took me seriously and diagnosed me.

    I've had a lot of people say I had no issue or people not taking me seriously. I opened up to a friend when i'd started self harming and they told me there was nothing wrong with me. That really delayed me getting help. A lot of that was to do with my mh issues though. I'm glad I was diagnosed with ADD cos people take it more seriously.

    I dropped out of DofE when i started getting depressed and all. I was in a skiing accident that "popped out my ribs" (what my osteopath said) a couple of years before too and it flared up cos of the strain on it. I spent the whole practice expedtion crying and in pain in the back of a boat. The whole thime I just wanted to jump out the boat and run away.

    I used to be terrible at taking tablets too. Luckily I learned cos otherwise i'd have even more trouble.
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    A counsellor cannot diagnose any mental health illness because they haven't had the training. They can say they suspect or suggest you get formally assessed but they aren't certified in any way to give you a formal diagnosis.

    The DSM and uk equivalent overlap in so many illnesses plus taking into account the individuality of how each client describes their experience of something. For example, what someone might call a hallucination, another might put it under dissociative experience.

    In terms of meds, I was given ones out of the branch of fluoxetine from age 16. They didn't do anything for me. I tried citalopram and that gave me scary side effects like heart palpitations, chest pain and blinding migraines. Really not worth it and came off them.

    After numerous suicide attempt I met a psychiatrist who put me on duloxetine which is a SNRI rather than SSRI and it works really well. As long as I remember to take them. The worse state I am in mentally when I go back on them, the worse my side effects are. Which should be an incentive to stay on them. They also affect my suicidal ideation more now if I'm not regularly than when I first started taking them.

    I'll have to take meds until my dissociation and PTSD resolves. It's a long term plan and runs alongside therapy with a clinical psychologist. I'm classed as disabled but I work as a therapist. I just need more recuperation time. But I have to be religious about taking my meds, eating and sleeping well. I get really thrown of my anxiety has messed up my sleep.
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    (Original post by Kindred)
    The problem isn't with diagnosis though, it's with stigma related to the condition.
    I think you should get told at least if they do think there is something to diagnose. Otherwise you're like me and haev to list a whole load of symptoms when people ask your medical history instead of just saying the diagnosis. Not just that but sometimes (like with dsa and things) you need the evidence.
    I can understand it if they're bordeline and they don't feel it's an issue, but if im concerned about it I should get answers if there are any.
    Like my brother may have ADHD, but it isn't an issue for him so he's never looked into it. I have difficulty with it though so for me it really helped to know.

    I know wha you mean. I never opened up to people quickly and it was even harder for me after so many people told me I had no problem. The only person I felt I could fully open up to for a while was my psych cos he took me seriously and diagnosed me.

    I've had a lot of people say I had no issue or people not taking me seriously. I opened up to a friend when i'd started self harming and they told me there was nothing wrong with me. That really delayed me getting help. A lot of that was to do with my mh issues though. I'm glad I was diagnosed with ADD cos people take it more seriously.

    I dropped out of DofE when i started getting depressed and all. I was in a skiing accident that "popped out my ribs" (what my osteopath said) a couple of years before too and it flared up cos of the strain on it. I spent the whole practice expedtion crying and in pain in the back of a boat. The whole thime I just wanted to jump out the boat and run away.

    I used to be terrible at taking tablets too. Luckily I learned cos otherwise i'd have even more trouble.
    Your right that their is a lot of stigmas attached to most conditions. But then I agree with you that having a name is easier than writing a load of symptoms but not knowing anything else.
    It's the same for claiming benefits that you need the evidence.

    That example of how your friend reacted is why I so badly think their is a need for more awareness and understanding of mental health. I know ther'es charities trying with campaings and that but they can only do so much. Personally I think their should be stuff like asembilies or tutor sessions focused on mental health in schools. But then I also think they should teach first aid in school and they don't. Either way, it is improving slowly but more needs doing.

    That seems like a fair enough reason to stop DofE. it's not for everyone.

    How did you learn to take tablets?
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    (Original post by ~Tara~)
    A counsellor cannot diagnose any mental health illness because they haven't had the training. They can say they suspect or suggest you get formally assessed but they aren't certified in any way to give you a formal diagnosis.

    The DSM and uk equivalent overlap in so many illnesses plus taking into account the individuality of how each client describes their experience of something. For example, what someone might call a hallucination, another might put it under dissociative experience.

    In terms of meds, I was given ones out of the branch of fluoxetine from age 16. They didn't do anything for me. I tried citalopram and that gave me scary side effects like heart palpitations, chest pain and blinding migraines. Really not worth it and came off them.

    After numerous suicide attempt I met a psychiatrist who put me on duloxetine which is a SNRI rather than SSRI and it works really well. As long as I remember to take them. The worse state I am in mentally when I go back on them, the worse my side effects are. Which should be an incentive to stay on them. They also affect my suicidal ideation more now if I'm not regularly than when I first started taking them.

    I'll have to take meds until my dissociation and PTSD resolves. It's a long term plan and runs alongside therapy with a clinical psychologist. I'm classed as disabled but I work as a therapist. I just need more recuperation time. But I have to be religious about taking my meds, eating and sleeping well. I get really thrown of my anxiety has messed up my sleep.
    Hi, I'm not sure who your replying to but as I've seen your post I will reply.

    When I had counsellors at school I probably didn't have any mental health condition that would get diagnosed. Probably the same in college. It just took until I got to CAMHS for them to work out what I do have-which to me feels like school failed me a bit, especially as I was at the resourced school in the area, so they have people with various disabilities there.

    I still haven't worked out what the meds are supposed to do-like you said at first it didn't work. How will I know if it's working or not?
    I also think I'm now starting to get some of the side affects, is it possible I could have 2-3days of no side affects and then they start or are all these strange things that are happening to me now not side affects of the medicine?
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    (Original post by dipka)
    Hi, I'm not sure who your replying to but as I've seen your post I will reply.

    When I had counsellors at school I probably didn't have any mental health condition that would get diagnosed. Probably the same in college. It just took until I got to CAMHS for them to work out what I do have-which to me feels like school failed me a bit, especially as I was at the resourced school in the area, so they have people with various disabilities there.

    I still haven't worked out what the meds are supposed to do-like you said at first it didn't work. How will I know if it's working or not?
    I also think I'm now starting to get some of the side affects, is it possible I could have 2-3days of no side affects and then they start or are all these strange things that are happening to me now not side affects of the medicine?
    Side effects usually last 4-6 weeks unless you've made a difference in when you take them. For example; if I have mine after lunch they start to affect my sleep cycle

    I'm sorry you feel let down and it does suck. Unfortunately, until you're in the NHS mental health system, diagnosis wouldn't happen. I mean even then diagnosis can be slow for young people. I started in camhs and was bounced around various services in early adulthood but I wasn't diagnosed until I was 27. Some of that is a reluctance to give any label and some of it is due to my own inability to really describe what was happening to me. I only started to be taken seriously when I started my training as a counsellor. I think some professionals can be condescending and they can diagnose you without telling you. I had an incorrect diagnosis of borderline personality hidden in my file which I discovered when the CPN tried to offer me a drugs trial for borderline personality. It wasn't until I began seeing a clinical psychologist for therapy that my diagnosis was amended to be PTSD with dissociative disorder.
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    (Original post by dipka)
    Your right that their is a lot of stigmas attached to most conditions. But then I agree with you that having a name is easier than writing a load of symptoms but not knowing anything else.
    It's the same for claiming benefits that you need the evidence.

    That example of how your friend reacted is why I so badly think their is a need for more awareness and understanding of mental health. I know ther'es charities trying with campaings and that but they can only do so much. Personally I think their should be stuff like asembilies or tutor sessions focused on mental health in schools. But then I also think they should teach first aid in school and they don't. Either way, it is improving slowly but more needs doing.

    That seems like a fair enough reason to stop DofE. it's not for everyone.

    How did you learn to take tablets?
    I think it should be part of PSHCE or something. I agree that they should teach first aid too. We had one lesson on that and it wasn't even that good. I hardly remember any of it compared to the courses I have done in it. Tbh first aid could be taught as part of PE even. It has the advantage tat PE teachers are actually trained in first aid usually when most other teaches won't be (I also think teachers should have first aid as part of their regular training). I've had so many experiences where the people you are mean to go to when you are injured at school don't know what they're doing. Had a boy faint and they held his head up while he was sat in a chair- massive no no. They wouldn't even clean out a huge messy cut one of my friends got in DT. It was with one of the tools they were using so they could have had all sorts in there and even been at risk of tetinus or something. I just took them to the DT department once she was turned away from the medical room cos I knew they'd have fully equiped fist aid kits (which the medical room didn't!). I actually had more training than them from scouts. They were the MEDICAL ROOM staff.
    Anyway sorry about the rant thats one of the subjects I like to rant about :P

    As far as MH education goes I would have been far better off if i'd had some idea of what they were and the symptoms. It took me years to realise I had OCD cos I had that stupid idea that it was a fear of germs. Ditto with my depression. I didn't realise that I was depressed until I got to the point I was contemplating suicide and SH.

    I learnt to take tablets through experience. I was never given the option of liquid so I had to take the tablets. To start with I would gag and fail all the time but eventually I got used to it. It's easier if you take them with a thick drink like smoothie or milkshake cos you loose the tablet in it and don't notice it going down. If you want to learn I'd start trying to swallow small things like those millions sweets and move up to things like smarties.
    I find it helps if you kinda flick them up with your toungue so they are floating and then quickly swallow before they hit your toungue again. If i can feel them on my toungue I always somehow end up holding them in my mouth while I swallow everything else. Oh and with tablets that don't have a coating or taste nasty put the drink in your mouth first then push the tablet through your lips or tilt your head to put them in. I still instantly spit it all out if I get a taste of paracetamol or something.
 
 
 
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