Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Hazard82)
    Point taken, I'm now thinking about doing a Physiology or Neuroscience IBSc which should be clinically focused enough. The only concern I have about sitting USMLE Step 1 after 4th year is that the summer between 4th and 5th year is only about 4 weeks, whilst the summer between 3rd and 4th year is about 3 months.

    Do the pros of completing 4th year outweigh the longer summer holiday after 3rd year? Can the "pseudoclinical knowledge" needed for USMLE Step 1 not be learned within 3 months?

    I understand everyone's different but I just want to know if the route I'm suggesting is realistic
    Actually i would argue that sitting it at the end of 3rd year is better because
    1. Your chances of getting accepted into electives (Clinical or Research) will greatly increase and you need USCE.
    2. The 3 months is ample time given you have been studying for step 1 since year 2

    Though i would say sit an NBME prefereabbly 12 or the Uworld practice exam, you should really be aiming for 230+.
    On a side note i would say intercalate an MSc or MREs or if u have time and resources look onto transferring on the final year of a US honours degree or a masters in the USA though the later is far harder as the masters is 2 years, finances and GRE tests etc. but trasferring on to the honours course is alot more doable as i myself have contacts who have done so. Get publish and another good thing could be if you manage to spend your intercalating year as a research fellow at a US institution tho the process is very decentralised you would need to contact individual departments mail professors, prebaps ask your own professor, nepotism is very much real. Best of luck
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    I am doing a fairly chill intercalated year after 2 years of MBBS.

    I am starting to revise for step 1 (done like 2 weeks work of laid first aid revision), in theory I feel this prevent me from forgetting all the pre-clinical stuff that i did (as im doing my intercalated BSc in management lol).

    A quick question is what are the advantages of sitting the usmle step 1 as early in my career as possible? (probably in late 2018 or early 2019 in my 3rd year of MBBS (when I rejoin) ?
    any obvious disadvantage of sitting step 1 too early, apart from the obvious lack of clinical knowledge?

    How long does the step 1 score last? and if i get a crappy percentile can I resit? and will resits be detrimental?

    N.B. I am a pretty intense guy when it comes to studying, and have always scored top in written/mcqs so I am not overly worried about the difficulty as long as I take at least 9 months to revise the whole stuff.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by medicalstudent1)
    I am doing a fairly chill intercalated year after 2 years of MBBS.

    I am starting to revise for step 1 (done like 2 weeks work of laid first aid revision), in theory I feel this prevent me from forgetting all the pre-clinical stuff that i did (as im doing my intercalated BSc in management lol).

    A quick question is what are the advantages of sitting the usmle step 1 as early in my career as possible? (probably in late 2018 or early 2019 in my 3rd year of MBBS (when I rejoin) ?
    any obvious disadvantage of sitting step 1 too early, apart from the obvious lack of clinical knowledge?

    How long does the step 1 score last? and if i get a crappy percentile can I resit? and will resits be detrimental?

    N.B. I am a pretty intense guy when it comes to studying, and have always scored top in written/mcqs so I am not overly worried about the difficulty as long as I take at least 9 months to revise the whole stuff.
    Benefit: You can use it to apply for electives for places that require Step 1 scores. Furthermore, you earn yourself more time for Step 2 CS and CK revision. It sets you up nicely to ditch FY1 when you graduate to go to the US (ERAS means you need to more or less have scores before September of the year you're applying.

    ALL THE DISADVANTAGES:
    ALL COMPONENTS OF THE USMLE NEEDS TO BE COMPLETED IN 7 YEARS. PERIOD. So if you sit Step 1 in summer 2018 for example, you need to finish all parts by 2025. Which isn't hard, granted, but that is somewhat of a disadvantage if you're planning on doing any postgraduate things in the UK before jumping ship (though that being said, you probably won't be able to get into a program after 3 years out of uni, but hey ho)

    And no. You can't resit.

    If I can say one thing as someone going through the pains is that be realistic about what you're aiming for and why you want to move to the US. It's not impossible but c to gtainly not easy to get into prestigious programs as an IMG, and depending on what you specialise in / when you quit climbing the MMC ladder, it may be pretty difficult to return to the UK with full clinical recognition.

    It's not just about your academics. It's also bout your visa. And the cost of doing electives there. And the actual cost of exams. And possible ramifications of visa laws and what that might mean for future fellowships and so on. With all the effort put in, if you are clever enough to land a good residency program, you may as well use that time to apply for ACF and eventual professorship imo.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    To the original poster of this thread, CONGRATULATIONS! I want to commend you for planning ahead for potential residency training in America. You are already ahead of your peers by asking all these very relevant questions in early training.

    I am a practicing physician in United States and have worked here for the past 10 years. It is getting more difficult to get into US.
    Having said that, once you get a residency position, and pass your
    board exams, the future is still good here. I recently started a blog at
    foreignbornmd.com It is a self-funded venture and focuses on the
    financial aspects of doing your USMLE/residency interviews in America. Please message me if you have questions on this.



    (Original post by Bezoar)
    Hi there,

    Currently a first year medical student I (know it's early days but these things need planning!) seriously contemplating doing the USMLEs after talks with various doctors and medical students.

    A bit of research into it taught me that these exams are extremely expensive, and very intense - and because US graduates are given priority for residency places, realistically I need to be scoring very highly if I want to get into a decent place if and when the time comes. I don't want to spend all that money on these exams and only get a mediocre score (and therefore a mediocre residency).

    Has anyone here taken the USMLEs or currently in the process of taking them?
    If so, I have a few questions:

    1) How did you save up the money to pay for them?
    2) How long in advance did you study for each step?
    3) What year of medical school / training did you take each step?
    4) What textbooks and resources did you use?
    5) What general advice do you have for someone thinking of taking them?

    Thanks in advance
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What's your favourite Christmas sweets?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.