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    This may be the wrong place for this but thought I’d give it a shot…I’ve been working as a secondary school maths teacher for the last 7 years or so but am becoming increasingly unhappy and fed up withdealing with unruly children! Now in my late twenties I’m considering a career change and accounting/auditing seems something which I think I may be suited to. In terms of qualifications, I have excellent GCSEs and A-Levels with A*GCSE maths and grade A at A-Level and a 2:1 Mathematics degree plus also 7 years of a demanding maths teaching job on my CV. Skills wise I have excellent maths and IT skills and I’m very strong when it comes to organisation,communication skills and have a very strong work ethic. If anyone could give meany pointers in answering any of these questions I would be very grateful…


    1. Is the kind of career change I have described feasible and how likely is it I would be able to find someone to train me?

    2. What would be the best route in for me in my situation? I do have a mortgage to pay so would need to be earning whilst training. I presume I can still apply for a graduate scheme even at my age?


    3. Would I need any work experience in the industry before employers would consider me?


    4. For those who have done it, is accounting/auditing acareer you would recommend? (I know for example I would probably not recommend the job I do at the moment!)


    Any pointers here much appreciated!
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    1. You meet the criteria for most training contract positions, so you can apply for these for sure. Bare in mind some positions they may want recent graduates.

    2. Best route for you would be to find yourself a training contract! 3 years long, you'll be working and studying in blocks (most likely) and expected to qualify after 3 years. For graduate positions, age doesn't matter, but the time between graduating and getting a graduate position might do. It really depends on the employer. You'll be earning a decent salary when training, this of course goes up substantially when you qualify, but bare in mind you might have to take a salary cut initially.

    3. Relevant work experience might help, but it really isn't essential.

    4. I work in audit, and whilst it isn't the most thrilling part of accountancy, it's a very team-orientated role and a good stepping stone to move onto different areas in finance.

    Good luck.
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    Heyy I'm going to complete a pgce in secondary maths next academic year, I also have a 2:1 in maths like you. What are the main reasons you wouldn't recommend becoming a maths teacher?
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    (Original post by Kre)
    1. You meet the criteria for most training contract positions, so you can apply for these for sure. Bare in mind some positions they may want recent graduates.

    2. Best route for you would be to find yourself a training contract! 3 years long, you'll be working and studying in blocks (most likely) and expected to qualify after 3 years. For graduate positions, age doesn't matter, but the time between graduating and getting a graduate position might do. It really depends on the employer. You'll be earning a decent salary when training, this of course goes up substantially when you qualify, but bare in mind you might have to take a salary cut initially.

    3. Relevant work experience might help, but it really isn't essential.

    4. I work in audit, and whilst it isn't the most thrilling part of accountancy, it's a very team-orientated role and a good stepping stone to move onto different areas in finance.

    Good luck.
    Hi Kre thanks for your reply that's really useful.

    Money wise I'm on about £35k at the moment, but could afford to take a bit of a cut (especially if it's only a temporary thing), by decent starting salary I'm guessing about £25k?

    Could you suggest any employers who might offer the sort of training contract I'm after? I'm in the Nottingham area.
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    (Original post by sabana)
    Heyy I'm going to complete a pgce in secondary maths next academic year, I also have a 2:1 in maths like you. What are the main reasons you wouldn't recommend becoming a maths teacher?
    Hi Sabana,

    I'm not 100% sure whether I would recommend it or not. It would perhaps depend on the person, the circumstances of their life and what they are looking for but if I was forced in to a yes or no answer I would probably say no I would not recommend it.

    There are some positives about the job. Working with young people is enjoyable, the money is quite good (but only after you've been doing it a few years, at the start you are paid a poor salary considering the hours you have to put in), jobs are easy to find. Also, despite what some people say you do get a great deal of autonomy and creative freedom as a teacher which is nice. Teaching has helped me to develop as a person and I've developed skills like confidence, assertiveness and resilience.

    The main problem is workload, it's too high to lead a normal life. Teaching is not a normal job but more a way of life. Expect to give up evenings and weekends. Do not expect a thank you. The stress may well have an impact on your mental health and on your social life/friendships/personal relationships. If you're fresh out of uni in your early 20s, you may want to live a little first before you take the plunge and become a teacher. Become a teacher by all means but what I would say it (a) you have to really want to do it and be prepared to make a sacrifice (b) have a plan B - almost half of all new teachers quit within the first five years and (c) think very carefully about which school you take a job at when you take the NQT year as if it isn't a good school with supportive collagues you will most likely be fighting a losing battle

    Good luck.
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    (Original post by HC_1234)
    Hi Kre thanks for your reply that's really useful.

    Money wise I'm on about £35k at the moment, but could afford to take a bit of a cut (especially if it's only a temporary thing), by decent starting salary I'm guessing about £25k?

    Could you suggest any employers who might offer the sort of training contract I'm after? I'm in the Nottingham area.
    http://www.accountancyage.com/static/top50-this-year

    These are the top accounting firms in the UK. A lot of the bigger firms will have offices around the Nottingham area. They'll all offer training contracts.

    In terms of starting salary, this all really depends on the size of your firm and its location. If you work for a big firm in London, it's around £28k. For your area, I'd probably think it's around £20k-£25k for your first year. Again, this really depends on a lot of things.

    However, at the end of the 3 years, you can close to double your starting salary and it opens up a lot of opportunities.

    Have a look at the ICAEW website for a bit more background on what you'll be doing (most firms train their trainees with ICAEW in practice). I'm assuming at 28 you haven't been studying for anything for quite a while? The exams can be challenging, so make sure you're prepared for a scenario being back at uni again!

    http://www.icaew.com/
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    (Original post by Kre)
    http://www.accountancyage.com/static/top50-this-year

    These are the top accounting firms in the UK. A lot of the bigger firms will have offices around the Nottingham area. They'll all offer training contracts.

    In terms of starting salary, this all really depends on the size of your firm and its location. If you work for a big firm in London, it's around £28k. For your area, I'd probably think it's around £20k-£25k for your first year. Again, this really depends on a lot of things.

    However, at the end of the 3 years, you can close to double your starting salary and it opens up a lot of opportunities.

    Have a look at the ICAEW website for a bit more background on what you'll be doing (most firms train their trainees with ICAEW in practice). I'm assuming at 28 you haven't been studying for anything for quite a while? The exams can be challenging, so make sure you're prepared for a scenario being back at uni again!

    http://www.icaew.com/
    Thanks again for the reply.

    I'm more used to setting and marking exams rather than sitting them, but I am used to sitting down and doing extra work at evenings and weekends so hopefully that will stand me in good stead.
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    (Original post by HC_1234)
    Hi Sabana,

    I'm not 100% sure whether I would recommend it or not. It would perhaps depend on the person, the circumstances of their life and what they are looking for but if I was forced in to a yes or no answer I would probably say no I would not recommend it.

    There are some positives about the job. Working with young people is enjoyable, the money is quite good (but only after you've been doing it a few years, at the start you are paid a poor salary considering the hours you have to put in), jobs are easy to find. Also, despite what some people say you do get a great deal of autonomy and creative freedom as a teacher which is nice. Teaching has helped me to develop as a person and I've developed skills like confidence, assertiveness and resilience.

    The main problem is workload, it's too high to lead a normal life. Teaching is not a normal job but more a way of life. Expect to give up evenings and weekends. Do not expect a thank you. The stress may well have an impact on your mental health and on your social life/friendships/personal relationships. If you're fresh out of uni in your early 20s, you may want to live a little first before you take the plunge and become a teacher. Become a teacher by all means but what I would say it (a) you have to really want to do it and be prepared to make a sacrifice (b) have a plan B - almost half of all new teachers quit within the first five years and (c) think very carefully about which school you take a job at when you take the NQT year as if it isn't a good school with supportive collagues you will most likely be fighting a losing battle

    Good luck.
    Hi,
    Thanks so much for your advice it is really useful. I actually started last September and have completed one placement but I had a difficult first placement as my mentor was very harsh towards me and not very supportive also I didnt like the school I was in much. The bad experience on placement knocked my confidence quite a bit so I left and am currently taking a break from the course with a view to gaining more school experience and going back to finish the rest in January. You talked about the pgce that it has helped your confidence a lot, what if you arent a very confident person in the beginning do you think you'd struggle during the year. I generally found behaviour management very difficult because i'm not a very confident or assertive person therefore I am debating whether or not I would make a good teacher even if I did go back. Do you have any advice for me? What are the main things that have helped build your confidence and assertiveness?
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    (Original post by HC_1234)
    This may be the wrong place for this but thought I’d give it a shot…I’ve been working as a secondary school maths teacher for the last 7 years or so but am becoming increasingly unhappy and fed up withdealing with unruly children! Now in my late twenties I’m considering a career change and accounting/auditing seems something which I think I may be suited to. In terms of qualifications, I have excellent GCSEs and A-Levels with A*GCSE maths and grade A at A-Level and a 2:1 Mathematics degree plus also 7 years of a demanding maths teaching job on my CV. Skills wise I have excellent maths and IT skills and I’m very strong when it comes to organisation,communication skills and have a very strong work ethic. If anyone could give meany pointers in answering any of these questions I would be very grateful…


    1. Is the kind of career change I have described feasible and how likely is it I would be able to find someone to train me?

    2. What would be the best route in for me in my situation? I do have a mortgage to pay so would need to be earning whilst training. I presume I can still apply for a graduate scheme even at my age?


    3. Would I need any work experience in the industry before employers would consider me?


    4. For those who have done it, is accounting/auditing acareer you would recommend? (I know for example I would probably not recommend the job I do at the moment!)


    Any pointers here much appreciated!

    I have just done something very similar.
    In fact, your credentials are possibly a tad stronger than mine but I was in my 2nd year of teaching maths, third if you include PGCE.

    Apply for September start grad schemes, Big4 will pay ~£30k which may, initially be a small cut but it will increase pretty swiftly.

    Auditing is traditionally very tedious but there are many areas of accounting/finance.

    So yes it is feasible, grad schemes have no age limit and you will have a good chance.

    If you want me to be more specific about my own situation in order to inform you more than send me a private message.

    All the best.
 
 
 
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