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    Currently doing AS Levels, but would like to get a solid A grade for both this summer and next summer.
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    So, I got A* in English Lit at A2, without great teachers. The important thing is to know exam formula- read mark schemes, look at past papers, read examiners reports. Knowing exam theory is half the battle! Then just know your texts well- get York Notes for them, make spider diagrams, do practice questions- don't waste your time writing them all out in full, do some speedy plans and do the odd timed essay to get your timings right. If you have a closed book exam make a targeted selection of quotations rather than trying to learn too many- make sure they tick lots of boxes for many questions. I remember doing my final exam for English Lit, and thinking in the exam: Make a couple of structure points, some on form, some close analysis of language, and get in historical context. Then, just make alternative interpretations- so make one Marxist point, for example, then reinterpret with a Feminist perspective, then come to a solid conclusion. If you know the exam formula and know your texts well enough you'll do fine- what I found helpful was looking up model answers to questions, so have a hunt around on the TSR English Lit exam threads to find some. Exam formula + Knowledge = success
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    (Original post by Fawkesgirl33)
    So, I got A* in English Lit at A2, without great teachers. The important thing is to know exam formula- read mark schemes, look at past papers, read examiners reports. Knowing exam theory is half the battle! Then just know your texts well- get York Notes for them, make spider diagrams, do practice questions- don't waste your time writing them all out in full, do some speedy plans and do the odd timed essay to get your timings right. If you have a closed book exam make a targeted selection of quotations rather than trying to learn too many- make sure they tick lots of boxes for many questions. I remember doing my final exam for English Lit, and thinking in the exam: Make a couple of structure points, some on form, some close analysis of language, and get in historical context. Then, just make alternative interpretations- so make one Marxist point, for example, then reinterpret with a Feminist perspective, then come to a solid conclusion. If you know the exam formula and know your texts well enough you'll do fine- what I found helpful was looking up model answers to questions, so have a hunt around on the TSR English Lit exam threads to find some. Exam formula + Knowledge = success
    You're advice would certainly be helpful, but unfortunately the spec changed this year; there are no available past papers or examiner's reports, only one specimen paper for each exam. That means exam technique is different too.

    OP, I would advise you to do loads of exam-style essays; they are the best way to learn about what you need to know since there is no textbook which tells you what you need to know.
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    (Original post by Abstract_Prism)
    You're advice would certainly be helpful, but unfortunately the spec changed this year; there are no available past papers or examiner's reports, only one specimen paper for each exam. That means exam technique is different too.

    OP, I would advise you to do loads of exam-style essays; they are the best way to learn about what you need to know since there is no textbook which tells you what you need to know.
    Would it be okay to use the texts in the practise essays? Or shall I try to learn quotes for a specific essay and write it. I'm struggling on how to start revising English Lit, I'm currently just looking at my texts and a blank sheet of paper, and struggling on where to begin.
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    (Original post by SteamboatMickey)
    Would it be okay to use the texts in the practise essays? Or shall I try to learn quotes for a specific essay and write it. I'm struggling on how to start revising English Lit, I'm currently just looking at my texts and a blank sheet of paper, and struggling on where to begin.
    I use the texts when I'm practicing, yes. Even for the closed-book essays, since I'm not actually testing myself, but I'm trying to learn. Same reason why I use the mark scheme and examiner's reports when I'm doing past papers in other subjects .

    What I do is get my teacher to set me essay titles, and I answer them. From there, all the quotes I've used I put into one big document of quotes for that text.

    If you're doing Tragedy, check this thread out. You'll find some example essays of good quality. http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=3924985
 
 
 
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