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    Hello
    Is actuarial the same as quant?
    Also can you become quant without phd? Any routes?

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    Most quants hold a PhD or masters in mathematics, physics and other quantitative disciplines as obvious, however a PhD is most common, and even obtaining it does not guarantee a quant position. Can I ask what course you are studying and what university?
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    Mechanical Engineering from University of South Bank
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    An actuary is completely different to a quant. Actuaries work in insurance/pensions, quants work in the likes of risk management/trading.
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    (Original post by studos)
    Mechanical Engineering from University of South Bank
    You're probably going to have to look to acquiring further qualifications at more reputable institutions!

    I recommend you aim to do as well as possible at your current undergraduate (aim for a 2:1, or even better, a 1st) - then go on to doing some form of post-graduate study at a more targeted university with a stronger brand (e.g. Warwick, Imperial, UCL etc.).

    You of course should know that these positions are highly competitive, so you will need to make yourself as attractive as possible by any means necessary. I recommend you also get as much work experience as possible, whilst you're studying and look to joining societies and dabbling in some other hobbies!
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    (Original post by Foxab77)
    loool
    Don't be a ****.
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    (Original post by studos)
    Mechanical Engineering from University of South Bank
    You'll need to get onto a PhD programme in any of Maths/Engineering/CS/Physics or a quantitative/mathematical finance Masters at a target uni (Warwick, Oxbridge, LSE, UCL, Imperial, LBS, ESSEC, Bocconi, HSG, MIT, Princeton etc) to stand a chance.

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    (Original post by studos)
    Hello
    Is actuarial the same as quant?
    Also can you become quant without phd? Any routes?

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Nothing's guaranteed in life, there are plenty ex-poly grads in top jobs and converesly and converesly, many Oxbridge grads on the dole, (check out linkedin).

    However, the norm is that quants (in an IB) not only have a STEM degree but also a PhD and even postdoc qualifications.

    But you also find quants in asset management who don't even have a STEM degree. Obviously these won't be performing stochastic calculations.

    Quants are the mathematicians in a financial institution and some are purely theoretical who do research, whilst others run their own portfolio and generate pnl.

    An actuary usually works in Insurance companies. They needn't be mathematicians. Some have economics degrees or other numerical disciplines.

    There are a series of exams to take and after qualifying, specialise in one of four areas: general insurance, life assurance, pensions or investments.

    Bear in mind, only about 1/3 of those who enter the actuarial profession qualify and it typically takes 5 to 7 years.

    There is an easier route: take an ug degree in actuarial science followed by a masters at cass. Do well in both and you get exmptions from all but the fellowship paper, if I recall correctly.

    Still though, like the CFA, you need work experience before gaining the FIA qualufication.

    PM shamika I you want to know more about actuarial science.
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    First, find out what a quant and an actuary are. They have little in common except that they are both mathematical careers. Secondly, you have almost no chance of getting into a good Msc and PhD program so go for something like trading instead. It takes a lot of commitment, time and effort to do a PhD which you don't seem to have since you're always jumping between career paths.
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    (Original post by High Stakes)
    Don't be a ****.
    It's all good banter after all
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    (Original post by studos)
    Hello
    Is actuarial the same as quant?
    Also can you become quant without phd? Any routes?

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    No you won't usually get hired unless you do a PhD in a mathematical discipline, preferably in maths. However, I've seen some people do a Masters in Financial Emgineering and get quant jobs but this is really expensive (I think it costs like $50000 or something) and it's cheaper and better to do a PhD. Even if you do a PhD, you're not guaranteed a job so only do the PhD because you have a passion for your subject, not for getting a quant job.
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    (Original post by studos)
    Mechanical Engineering from University of South Bank
    No you are studying at Salford, studos.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    You'll need to get onto a PhD programme in any of Maths/Engineering/CS/Physics or a quantitative/mathematical finance Masters at a target uni (Warwick, Oxbridge, LSE, UCL, Imperial, LBS, ESSEC, Bocconi, HSG, MIT, Princeton etc) to stand a chance.

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    Yeah but it will be so difficult (almost impossible to get on to a Masters course at a good university and then go on to do a PhD at a target uni if OP is at south bank, which is not very reputable at all. Besides, there's no point doing a PhD just to get a quant job because 1) quant jobs are hard to get 2) a PhD takes a MASSIVE amount of effort, so OP needs to be passionate about the subject. PhDs are mainly for people interested in academia and research. Usually, people do a PhD for the passion, and while doing it, they discover that they could have a good career being a quant and then apply for quant jobs.

    It was great advice though, just a bit general.
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    (Original post by Trapz99)
    Yeah but it will be so difficult (almost impossible to get on to a Masters course at a good university and then go on to do a PhD at a target uni if OP is at south bank, which is not very reputable at all. Besides, there's no point doing a PhD just to get a quant job because 1) quant jobs are hard to get 2) a PhD takes a MASSIVE amount of effort, so OP needs to be passionate about the subject. PhDs are mainly for people interested in academia and research. Usually, people do a PhD for the passion, and while doing it, they discover that they could have a good career being a quant and then apply for quant jobs.

    It was great advice though, just a bit general.
    Ahahah, I'm well aware but given OP's history of posts/threads I didn't really want to delve into the specifics.

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Ahahah, I'm well aware but given OP's history of posts/threads I didn't really want to delve into the specifics.

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    Yeah true. I thought he wanted to apply for law training contracts last week lol, and a few days before that he was talking about accounting and engineering.
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    (Original post by Ladbants)
    No you are studying at Salford, studos.
    Lol I love how he called it Unviersity of South Bank when it's actually London South Bank Unviersity.
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    (Original post by Trapz99)
    Yeah but it will be so difficult (almost impossible to get on to a Masters course at a good university and then go on to do a PhD at a target uni if OP is at south bank, which is not very reputable at all. Besides, there's no point doing a PhD just to get a quant job because 1) quant jobs are hard to get 2) a PhD takes a MASSIVE amount of effort, so OP needs to be passionate about the subject. PhDs are mainly for people interested in academia and research. Usually, people do a PhD for the passion, and while doing it, they discover that they could have a good career being a quant and then apply for quant jobs.

    It was great advice though, just a bit general.
    I disagree on the initial statement - Plenty of ex-polytechnic students get accepted onto postgraduate courses at strong (and even target) universities supposing their grades are sufficient. Universities are not allowed to discriminate on that basis. Universities will look at how applicants have scored in their modules AND if they have taken the right modules that would prepare them for the postgrad. course that they offer (which may be why some ex-polytechnics limit the places their graduates can go on to study at, because their modules tend to be less flexible and less rigorous).That said, OP does seem to be jumping from one career to another AND the fact that they are at South Bank implies they may not be academic enough to meet the tough requirements needed to even have the slightest chance of getting into quant.

    Now in terms of what they can do in postgraduate, it's fairly common for engineers to go on to pursue masters and PhDs in applied mathematics (although a rare minority do manage to go into pure maths if they display aptitude and self teach themselves the necessary content).

    BUT, a PhD in itself is no joking matter. If the OP is so uncommitted to one agenda/career, then how will they sustain their motivation through the years that it will take to complete a masters and PhD? And, if they do get accepted into some form of postgraduate at a better, more respected university - will they be able to cope?
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    (Original post by Trapz99)
    Lol I love how he called it Unviersity of South Bank when it's actually London South Bank Unviersity.
    I noticed that too lol.

    Is there any particular reason why the traditional/RG universities are all "University Of..." and ex-polytechnics are all "X University? Kind of curious.
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    (Original post by studos)
    Mechanical Engineering from University of South Bank
    Looool this made me smile.
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    (Original post by High Stakes)
    I noticed that too lol.

    Is there any particular reason why the traditional/RG universities are all "University Of..." and ex-polytechnics are all "X University? Kind of curious.
    Some RG universities are exceptions to this:
    Durham University
    Cardiff university
    Newcastle university

    And then there the London university colleges:
    Imperial College London
    University College London
    London School of Economics

    But I think it's mainly because the RG unis are older and traditional so have more traditional sounding names like "university of" while newer, less good unis prefer to just be called "x university".
 
 
 
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