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refused to give up my seat for woman with baby on the bus today Watch

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    (Original post by Phoebe Buffay)
    What do you mean 'screw it up with the EU vote'?
    The EU is awful, but it'll be worse outside. We are marginally better off inside the EU atm. The EU needs HUGE reform, I'm not denying it, but there will be a large economic cost to leaving the EU, and guess who will pay for it? That's right, the youngest generation. Not the pensioners who have tripled locked pensions, who are the ones voting to leave.
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    (Original post by Mathemagicien)
    The EU is awful, but it'll be worse outside. We are marginally better off inside the EU atm. The EU needs HUGE reform, I'm not denying it, but there will be a large economic cost to leaving the EU, and guess who will pay for it? That's right, the youngest generation. Not the pensioners who have tripled locked pensions, who are the ones voting to leave.
    I don't think it will be worse outside the EU. There are only 28 countries in the union, and there are many perfectly well run countries outside of it, with many much smaller than ours. As for the large economic cost, again this has been blown out of all proportion.

    Yes, the EU needs 'huge reform'. But look at our PM's woeful attempt at renegotiation, and see how little appetite there is for reform. It simply won't happen.
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    Was it one of those 'full time mommys'
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    (Original post by Phoebe Buffay)
    How can I not? Quite easily I tell you that. All of the pregnant women I've seen on the train have been perfectly capable of standing. I would only give up my seat for somebody who is very visibly old.

    What especially annoys me about pregnant women on the tube is that they wear the 'baby on board' badges which are quite passive aggressive. And they must be resisted.
    Are you being sarcastic?

    The jolting movement of buses and trains as well as the possibility for falling over/ falling into others/others falling into you is a great risk to an unborn child. It's a very delicate situation.

    The risk of deep vein thrombosis is increased with pregnancy as it is with standing still for periods of time, the two in combination are to be avoided.

    Mothers wear the badge to avoid the usual pushing, shoving etc usually encountered on public transport. Also, as with car stickers that declare 'baby on board' it let's medics or those giving medical assistance know that the person has a particular condition; pregnancy, that may determine how they are to be treated in the event of an emergency/accident.

    As for giving a seat to new mothers. Really, just do it. They're often exhausted beyond what you can imagine. Stop pretending to be so clever about it.
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    (Original post by Venetian Snares)
    You were right OP. If she wasnt currently pregnant, then why does she just expect people to get up for her.

    Good going OP
    Well she could be having about 1 hour of sleep a night, hmmm could be a kind thing to do to give up a seat for a few minutes.
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    (Original post by leavingthecity)
    They're often exhausted beyond what you can imagine. Stop pretending to be so clever about it.
    I'll be honest I didn't read most of it. I simply couldn't care less.

    But I skipped to the end and saw this.


    I'll have you know I have 3 children so wind your neck in
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    (Original post by Phoebe Buffay)
    I'll be honest I didn't read most of it. I simply couldn't care less.

    But I skipped to the end and saw this.


    I'll have you know I have 3 children so wind your neck in
    If you won't read peoples contributions and couldn't care less about their opinions, why are you on a FORUM?

    Ok, maybe that was not your experience of having a newborn. Please don't tell other women (the majority) who's pregnant bodies cannot cope with modern public transport how they should act to the likely detriment of their child. Do your medical research before spouting such things.
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    (Original post by leavingthecity)
    If you won't read peoples contributions and couldn't care less about their opinions, why are you on a FORUM?

    Ok, maybe that was not your experience of having a newborn. Please don't tell other women (the majority) who's pregnant bodies cannot cope with modern public transport how they should act to the likely detriment of their child. Do your medical research before spouting such things.
    Because most of the contributions on here are nonsense.

    As for you, you are really laying it on a bit. They 'cannot cope with modern public transport'? Well they shouldn't be on it. I think you are exaggerating.
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    (Original post by Phoebe Buffay)
    Because most of the contributions on here are nonsense.

    As for you, you are really laying it on a bit. They 'cannot cope with modern public transport'? Well they shouldn't be on it. I think you are exaggerating.
    I agree with that.

    Often women don't have a choice. If they are working in Central London and need to stay working right up until giving birth because it's required of them, they are likely to use public transport because of the cost of driving into the west end/city/wharf. Busses where you can use your oyster are cheap and fairly reliable. Not being able to cope is a reference to their bodies, they may not even want a seat, but fact is jolting around and being shoved is putting the baby at high risk just because the process of pregnancy is so delicate.
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    (Original post by Phoebe Buffay)
    I don't think it will be worse outside the EU. There are only 28 countries in the union, and there are many perfectly well run countries outside of it, with many much smaller than ours. As for the large economic cost, again this has been blown out of all proportion.
    Yes, there are more outside the EU. Much further away. In their own free trade zones. With much different economies. Vastly different regulations.

    No, it hasn't been blown out of proportion.

    Yes, the EU needs 'huge reform'. But look at our PM's woeful attempt at renegotiation, and see how little appetite there is for reform. It simply won't happen.
    There is going to be MUCH more appetite for reform come the next elections



    It'd be easier if the EU broke apart simultaneously, and we formed a new union, which learnt from the old EU, rather than a staggered collapse, and a feeble attempt at unions with people an ocean away. If only we had waited a few years - the EU is destined to collapse soon anyway
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    If you're well enough to push a pram around then you're well enough to stand on a bus.
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    (Original post by Mathemagicien)
    Yes, there are more outside the EU. Much further away. In their own free trade zones. With much different economies. Vastly different regulations.

    No, it hasn't been blown out of proportion.
    Firstly, I'm not sure what geographical proximity to the EU has to do with whether or not a country can be successful outside of it. 'Much further away'...?

    Secondly, I think you are misusing the term 'free trade zone'. A country is not 'in' a free trade zone per se, a country can create a free trade zones. There are countries which have loads.

    Third, I think it's unfair to say that the countries outside of the EU have 'much different economies' to ours. There's a range.

    Fourth, your point about having different regulations could be true But I don't get it. What is it about our regulations now/in the future which would curtail our ability to be a successful country outside of the EU?



    (Original post by Mathemagicien)
    There is going to be MUCH more appetite for reform come the next elections
    We'll see What makes you say this?


    (Original post by Mathemagicien)
    It'd be easier if the EU broke apart simultaneously, and we formed a new union, which learnt from the old EU, rather than a staggered collapse, and a feeble attempt at unions with people an ocean away. If only we had waited a few years - the EU is destined to collapse soon anyway
    Well we can only live in hope.
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    I'm a mother and to be honest I wasn't that bothered if I had to stand on the bus. However I can tell you new mothers are probably still in a fair amount of pain or at the very least discomfort. Imagine walking around feeling like your insides are about to fall out because that is what it's like. Even worse if you had to have stitches.
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    I have no pronlem giving my seat up for someone elderly, pregnant or they just look as though they need it for me. I just thought it was good manners and common courtesy not be selfish. Young people get a bad rep easily enough as it is. Im surpised at some attitudes on here.
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    Good man.
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    (Original post by Phoebe Buffay)
    Firstly, I'm not sure what geographical proximity to the EU has to do with whether or not a country can be successful outside of it. 'Much further away'...?
    Proximity is the best determiner of trade volume, mainly because of transport costs.

    Secondly, I think you are misusing the term 'free trade zone'. A country is not 'in' a free trade zone per se, a country can create a free trade zones. There are countries which have loads.
    My point is, there isn't going to be a huge queue to join the UK in creating a free trade zone

    Third, I think it's unfair to say that the countries outside of the EU have 'much different economies' to ours. There's a range.
    The most similar economies, in a reasonable range, excluding the EU, are Norway, Switzerland, Canada, and the US. If we leave the EU, we'd have to have a free trade agreement with the US. Ironically, I hear many Brexiters (Brexiteers? ) hatin' on the TTIP deal

    Fourth, your point about having different regulations could be true But I don't get it. What is it about our regulations now/in the future which would curtail our ability to be a successful country outside of the EU?
    The more different the regulations, the more expensive to trade with them.

    We'll see What makes you say this?
    The rise of the 'far right', even in Germany. Major 'Far right' parties (everything UKIP and rightwards) are polling around 15-20% on average across Europe. Since most countries have fair voting systems (proportional representation, or similar), this is going to have a much larger effect than the rise of UKIP.
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    (Original post by Phoebe Buffay)
    How can I not? Quite easily I tell you that. All of the pregnant women I've seen on the train have been perfectly capable of standing. I would only give up my seat for somebody who is very visibly old.

    What especially annoys me about pregnant women on the tube is that they wear the 'baby on board' badges which are quite passive aggressive. And they must be resisted.
    You shouldn't be judging whether someone needs a seat based on their physical appearance. That's sheer ignorance to numerous unseen medical conditions.
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    (Original post by Phoebe Buffay)
    I'll be honest I didn't read most of it. I simply couldn't care less.
    This is because you couldn't argue against valid points.


    I'll have you know I have 3 children so wind your neck in
    After reading your previous comments, it's very worrying that you have children of your own. You don't seem maternal at all.
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    (Original post by x-pixie-x)
    If you're well enough to push a pram around then you're well enough to stand on a bus.
    It's not about being unwell, it is about courtesy
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    (Original post by Mathemagicien)
    Proximity is the best determiner of trade volume, mainly because of transport costs
    Well, given that our economy is a services based one, the issue of trade costs and the like will not be as heavy on us as most other countries outside of the European Union.


    (Original post by Mathemagicien)
    My point is, there isn't going to be a huge queue to join the UK in creating a free trade zone
    I doubt this. We have a very large trade deficit with the EU, and a trade surplus with the rest of the world. It would be in the best interests of all EU countries to have an economic deal that suits everybody. They may not like it, economic pragmatism trumps not liking it.

    (Original post by Mathemagicien)
    The most similar economies, in a reasonable range, excluding the EU, are Norway, Switzerland, Canada, and the US. If we leave the EU, we'd have to have a free trade agreement with the US. Ironically, I hear many Brexiters (Brexiteers? ) hatin' on the TTIP deal
    Just out of interest, why do you think we would have to have a free trade agreement with the US? It's not necessary for trade, and we certainly don't have one with them at the moment.



    (Original post by Mathemagicien)
    The more different the regulations, the more expensive to trade with them.
    I think this is probably right. But do you have any estimates? Because none of the estimates I've seen exceed our yearly membership fee of the EU.



    (Original post by Mathemagicien)
    The rise of the 'far right', even in Germany. Major 'Far right' parties (everything UKIP and rightwards) are polling around 15-20% on average across Europe. Since most countries have fair voting systems (proportional representation, or similar), this is going to have a much larger effect than the rise of UKIP.
    Could happen. We shall just have to wait. But even leaders like Marine le Pen do not advocate leaving the EU. At least, I think she thinks it may be possible to 'renegotiate' the terms of membership. I'm not sure of any that advocate leaving.
 
 
 
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