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Views on Tall Girls? Can you relate? watch

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    (Original post by soph_mcswiney)
    I can't but feel really insecure about my height, being 16 and 5'11/6 foot. I'm not a heavily built, but I just feel gigantic compared to other people my age. Can anyone relate and what are your views on tall girls? x
    I'm 16, 6' too!! I get you. I'm 10lbs overweight and losing it (lose 40lbs so far) and thinking now I'm just a bigger build than everyone after seeing people with the same stats as me. I love being tall and never having to wear heels, but jfc I feel massive compared to them! They're all 5'4 and size 8s and then there's me ffs man
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    (Original post by queen-bee)
    I wouldn't be able to do that with you,seeing as we are only a few inches taller but my last two boyfriend were between 6'2 and 6'5 so that was possible,and not going to lie but it felt so good and protective like. I can't really describe it :love:

    I honestly don't get it,just legs and what are pins and tush :dontknow:
    Having long legs doesn't give me any particular advantage over my shorter legged female buddies
    You're only 5 ft 8, yeh it's above average but it's hardly tall enough to moan about! I mean tall range clothes usually start at 5ft 9 even!
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    (Original post by LiquidGold)
    You're only 5 ft 8, yeh it's above average but it's hardly tall enough to moan about! I mean tall range clothes usually start at 5ft 9 even!
    I guess so
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    (Original post by queen-bee)
    I guess so
    I think 5ft 8 is the perfect height, tall but not too tall
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    (Original post by LiquidGold)
    I think 5ft 8 is the perfect height, tall but not too tall
    I should be happy with what God has given me tbh
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    (Original post by hezzlington)
    I find tall girls really attractive.
    Agreed, very much a tall girl fan
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    (Original post by soph_mcswiney)
    I can't but feel really insecure about my height, being 16 and 5'11/6 foot. I'm not a heavily built, but I just feel gigantic compared to other people my age. Can anyone relate and what are your views on tall girls? x
    It is a huge positive, but you have to embrace it and be confident with it to unlock the advantages because it really does all come down to the body language.

    Unfortunately some girls are self conscious about it and have an attitude of being embarrassed and kind of apologetic for their height, and it means they stoop and have a lanky lolloping gait which is not very feminine.

    However when a girl stands upright and is confident with it and learns how to walk in an elegant, cat-like way then it is unbelievably sexy. Its one of the easiest ways to be a head-turner.

    If you're out at a club and see a tall girl who is 5ft 10 plus and who is making the most of her height its like she's a magnet. Maybe it is different for smaller guys idk, I'm 6ft 2 but that's what I think. Long legs are a great asset.
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    (Original post by star80)
    Hiya, could I ask how muchyou are in cm?
    Sorry for the weird question
    It's 180cm I think
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    I'm 5ft 6, and I'd love to be at least 2 or 3 inches taller
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    (Original post by soph_mcswiney)
    I can't but feel really insecure about my height, being 16 and 5'11/6 foot. I'm not a heavily built, but I just feel gigantic compared to other people my age. Can anyone relate and what are your views on tall girls? x
    In the long term this is advantageous for you, evolutionary speaking, because you are able to attract physically fitter and tall men. Height has been proven to correlate a person socio-economic status and career potential. Of course there are many exceptions to this (i.e. CEOs of major investment banks who are not very tall, many actors etc) but one could make this generalisation. Besides, 5'11/6ft sounds like a proper model height (google Claudia Schiffer), but if you go above 6ft 2 then yes you may have a problem. So far so good.
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    I'm a short female (5'2") and I feel like I can never be sexy because I'm so short I just look like a little girl who's trying to hard. In a lot of ways I feel like tall women can pull off sexy a lot better. I feel for short girls like me it is impossible to be a 9/10 or a 10/10 like all those beautiful models.
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    (Original post by leavingthecity)
    This is simply unscientific.

    Minerals and vitamins play their different roles. It is calories that literally provide energy. Some vitamins are required in the process that releases energy from calorific food but they are not energy in themselves. You have a fundamental misunderstanding of this vital process. Find the nearest packet of food, grab it and read the nutrition table. It will provide a figure for calories underneath a figure for energy in kilo joules. This is because calories provide energy.

    What you have said about copper is nonsense. "Nerd" is not a medical condition! You are getting confused, when you speak of copper and autism with studies done on the mercury consumption of mothers via fish and the link to autism. There is no such thing as the transmission of "intellectual thought". Thoughts are electrical impulses as are all other signals sent in the brain that support life.

    No, studies have been done that show that certain Omega fats stored in the fat on a mothers hips has a correlation with IQ. You can google this study yourself.

    Copper and Zinc are not opposites. How does that make any sense. Like every other mineral and vitamin the body needs them in certain ratios, this may be where you are getting confused. Chocolate is relatively high in copper, though only dark chocolate and it's not consumed in great enough amounts to have the effects you are talking about on a foetus. Copper is in fact essential for cell division. Again "nerdification" is the most ridiculous term I have ever heard. Are you referring to children on the autistic spectrum? My brother is one and he did not get that way because of dark chocolate.

    Again, no. It is not because alcohol is a diuretic. It is because it is toxic. By your reasoning we could load up on vitamin C for our energy and give birth to healthy babies. In fact, an excess of vitamin c cannot be stored in the body, increased acidity in the gut leads to increased gastric mobility which in turn may lead to the 'flushing out' of vitamins and minerals before they are absorbed by the gut. Again, just google alcohol and pregnancy, you are quite wrong here.

    Whilst you are correct that the nutrient content of our diets has changed, the timelines you give for avoiding alcohol are baseless. For each nutrient there will be a specific about of time that is needed for your body to store healthy levels of it, and this is only for those which are stored and that we do not need to consume daily such as water soluble vitamins.
    Medical science is so riddled with question-begging and corruption that most statisticians outside medicine consider it to be a joke. The biased information that is peddled seems to be apparent here. Try eating 10 bags of crisps and see if it gives you a quarter of the energy that vegetables, meat and rye bread with 1/10th the calorific content, along with, say, a good multivitamin (like Biocare) will give you.

    As for omega 3, didn't the great medical establishment recently decree that Omega-3 has a negligible impact on brain performance and IQ? It seems again you are mistaking correlation for causation. Omega-3 is fat soluble so of course it will be stored in areas of high fat concentration, like the hips. This doesn't, in of itself, mean anything. Are fat soluble vitamin d, vitamin a, zinc, potassium and sodium all correlated with higher IQ? Yes probably to some extent. They all play a role. But copper overload is much more significant. Copper overload usually results in copper deposition in the eyes, which leads to worsened eye function (nearly always necessitating the use of glasses). Find me one high level academic at an age where eye performance should not have dropped off in a healthy person (e.g. early 30s) who does not wear glasses or contacts. They are a very small percentage, I can tell you. The autism (or equivalently, nerdiness) caused by copper-overload also leads to academics being the kind of hyper-focused, socially unaware book-smart people that they are.

    I suspect your 'knowledge' of this suspect is limited to medical literature and your understanding of that literature itself is amateurish, based perhaps only on what the establishment puts out in its latest magazines. Look up alternative sources of information, other than the heavily pharmaceuticals influenced medical establishment, for a broader perspective. E.g. Cutler's book on heavy metal (e.g. copper) overload.
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    (Original post by queen-bee)
    I should be happy with what God has given me tbh
    God has not given this to you, your parents have. If they had starved you a bit, you'd be 5'7. :p:
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    (Original post by 41b)
    Medical science is so riddled with question-begging and corruption that most statisticians outside medicine consider it to be a joke. The biased information that is peddled seems to be apparent here. Try eating 10 bags of crisps and see if it gives you a quarter of the energy that vegetables, meat and rye bread with 1/10th the calorific content, along with, say, a good multivitamin (like Biocare) will give you.

    As for omega 3, didn't the great medical establishment recently decree that Omega-3 has a negligible impact on brain performance and IQ? It seems again you are mistaking correlation for causation. Omega-3 is fat soluble so of course it will be stored in areas of high fat concentration, like the hips. This doesn't, in of itself, mean anything. Are fat soluble vitamin d, vitamin a, zinc, potassium and sodium all correlated with higher IQ? Yes probably to some extent. They all play a role. But copper overload is much more significant. Copper overload usually results in copper deposition in the eyes, which leads to worsened eye function (nearly always necessitating the use of glasses). Find me one high level academic at an age where eye performance should not have dropped off in a healthy person (e.g. early 30s) who does not wear glasses or contacts. They are a very small percentage, I can tell you. The autism (or equivalently, nerdiness) caused by copper-overload also leads to academics being the kind of hyper-focused, socially unaware book-smart people that they are.

    I suspect your 'knowledge' of this suspect is limited to medical literature and your understanding of that literature itself is amateurish, based perhaps only on what the establishment puts out in its latest magazines. Look up alternative sources of information, other than the heavily pharmaceuticals influenced medical establishment, for a broader perspective. E.g. Cutler's book on heavy metal (e.g. copper) overload.
    Most statisticians outside of medical science? My ex colleague and good friend was previously a leading neurologist and later became the leading pharmaceutical equity analyst in Europe. After 15+years between Imperial and UCL studying physics, neurology and medicine he's rather good at both statistical analysis and scrutinising corporations. He would use the term "voo doo", a favourite of his, I am sure to describe what you have said. As it happens this person introduced me to credible publications such as Nature which you may wish to explore, they will contradict much of what you have said. I have also been reading literature from my mothers time at one of the countrys leading medical schools since the age of 5.

    Again, vitamins DO NOT SUPPLY ENERGY. This is completely wrong. They are involved in it's release. This is why if you ate 10 bags of crisps you would indeed have plenty of energy in the form of carbohydrates and fats. However, if you are nothing but crisps you would be lacking in the vitamins and minerals that are essential for the metabolism of carbohydrates and fats and would eventually feel lethargic, as well as gaining a host of other health problems. This is why sports people consume carbs before intense exercise, they want the highly available energy from the carbohydrates. Eating vegetables would provide no energy for an exertion. Eating meat would provide slow release energy. Eating a multivitamin would do next to nothing in the short term.

    As for fat on the hips, it's just the case that fat cells warehouse certain chemicals including omega fats.

    Your claim about glasses wearers is ridiculous. Have you also considered that being studious and staring at text or a screen all day might contribute?

    Please stop using the word "nerdniess" to describe an actual neurological condition. Please familiarise yourself with this condition before commenting on it. I think you are also confusing Asphergers with Autism. Because you do not understand either condition.
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    (Original post by leavingthecity)
    Most statisticians outside of medical science? My ex colleague and good friend was previously a leading neurologist and later became the leading pharmaceutical equity analyst in Europe. After 15+years between Imperial and UCL studying physics, neurology and medicine he's rather good at both statistical analysis and scrutinising corporations. He would use the term "voo doo", a favourite of his, I am sure to describe what you have said. As it happens this person introduced me to credible publications such as Nature which you may wish to explore, they will contradict much of what you have said. I have also been reading literature from my mothers time at one of the countrys leading medical schools since the age of 5.

    Again, vitamins DO NOT SUPPLY ENERGY. This is completely wrong. They are involved in it's release. This is why if you ate 10 bags of crisps you would indeed have plenty of energy in the form of carbohydrates and fats. However, if you are nothing but crisps you would be lacking in the vitamins and minerals that are essential for the metabolism of carbohydrates and fats and would eventually feel lethargic, as well as gaining a host of other health problems. This is why sports people consume carbs before intense exercise, they want the highly available energy from the carbohydrates. Eating vegetables would provide no energy for an exertion. Eating meat would provide slow release energy. Eating a multivitamin would do next to nothing in the short term.

    As for fat on the hips, it's just the case that fat cells warehouse certain chemicals including omega fats.

    Your claim about glasses wearers is ridiculous. Have you also considered that being studious and staring at text or a screen all day might contribute?

    Please stop using the word "nerdniess" to describe an actual neurological condition. Please familiarise yourself with this condition before commenting on it. I think you are also confusing Asphergers with Autism. Because you do not understand either condition.
    Perhaps the word provide is inaccurate. Responsible for is more accurate. Like I said, calories are secondary. And if you've actually done any marathon running (I suspect you haven't - I have) you'll realise that it has very varied effects. Some people even feel more tired after eating a lot of carbs.

    As for the rest of what you've said, I don't care what your nerd insider friend has to say. That proves my point more than anything.

    Ok good. A pharmaceutical proponent who agrees with a real health proponent on something. Fantastic. Will you admit that you were totally wrong and your point is unfounded?

    Looking at a computer screen does not worsen your eyesight, unless it is extremely bright against a dark background. Again, correlation is not causation. It is more likely that people who spend all their time looking at computer screens are the nerds who need glasses in the first place. Looking at a computer screen stresses your eyes, sure, but healthy people's eyes work well enough to handle the strain without a problem, until they start to age.

    I understand it much more than you do. My advice has cured some of my friends of autism and ADHD, more than any mainstream doctor can say.
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    (Original post by 41b)
    God has not given this to you, your parents have. If they had starved you a bit, you'd be 5'7. :p:
    Thank god they haven't starved me :laugh:
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    (Original post by 41b)
    Perhaps the word provide is inaccurate. Responsible for is more accurate. Like I said, calories are secondary. And if you've actually done any marathon running (I suspect you haven't - I have) you'll realise that it has very varied effects. Some people even feel more tired after eating a lot of carbs.

    As for the rest of what you've said, I don't care what your nerd insider friend has to say. That proves my point more than anything.

    Ok good. A pharmaceutical proponent who agrees with a real health proponent on something. Fantastic. Will you admit that you were totally wrong and your point is unfounded?

    Looking at a computer screen does not worsen your eyesight, unless it is extremely bright against a dark background. Again, correlation is not causation. It is more likely that people who spend all their time looking at computer screens are the nerds who need glasses in the first place. Looking at a computer screen stresses your eyes, sure, but healthy people's eyes work well enough to handle the strain without a problem, until they start to age.

    I understand it much more than you do. My advice has cured some of my friends of autism and ADHD, more than any mainstream doctor can say.
    This is so astoundingly false that I'm not even going to respond on this occasion.
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    (Original post by leavingthecity)
    This is so astoundingly false that I'm not even going to respond on this occasion.
    :console:
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    (Original post by 41b)
    :console:
    I'm sure a few medical students got a good laugh out of you at least.
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    (Original post by Eriasu)
    Do you have the same birth parents?
    yes
 
 
 
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