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    #1

    I've seen a huge amount of posts discussing why one should never adopt a child. I'm adopted. Obviously I look nothing like my parents, but they're still my parents. Personality-wise we're so alike it's freaky.
    My family have always been very open about the whole adopted-child situation, and I am absolutely their "kid."

    I get asked questions about my heritage etc on a weekly basis by customers at work (I work in retail), so it's not a difficult subject.

    Anything you'd like to know? Hit me!
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    I love the scandinavians. Never seen posts personally about why you shouldnt adopt and I think its a good thing if there are parents who can give a child a good home and children who need one. It doesnt always work, but there again it doesnt always work in biological families.

    Which country?

    How did you end up there?

    Are there many orientals? generally and with you in education?

    Do you think its any harder for a girl or a boy?

    Is there much racism?

    Have you managed to learn much about Souh Korea and values?

    I wont ask all the predictable adption questions.
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    What country in Scandinavia?

    Were you adopted as a baby or when you were a child? Do you speak any Korean?
    • #1
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    (Original post by 999tigger)
    Which country?
    Norway.

    (Original post by 999tigger)
    How did you end up there?
    I was adopted as a 6 month old.

    (Original post by 999tigger)
    Are there many orientals? generally and with you in education?
    My hometown is ethnically diverse. We have immigrant workers, refugees, other adopted children and people who just moved here from another country simply because they wanted to. Not many orientals, no.

    (Original post by 999tigger)
    Do you think its any harder for a girl or a boy?
    I'm a girl, so no. I don't think gender matters. A childhood friend of mine (girl) has an adopted brother, and I can't say it seems like she's had it more rough than her brother. I think this is very subjective, and gender has very little to do with it. I think it's up to the parents, relatives and friends. If the community accepts you, growing up as an adopted kid is not anything different than a native.

    (Original post by 999tigger)
    Is there much racism?
    Not that I can tell. My town is generally close-minded, but the older generation is dying, and refugees are moving here. I think people are being forced to be a lot more open minded now than before, and so far it's had a positive impact on community.

    (Original post by 999tigger)
    Have you managed to learn much about Souh Korea and values?
    No, sadly I haven't. I definitely do want to learn more, but I'm not taking a degree in it. I'd say I want it to be more of a personal project. A hobby of sorts. Makes sense?
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    (Original post by TheTechN1304)
    Do you speak any Korean?
    No, I don't. I only know the word for mom and dad.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I've seen a huge amount of posts discussing why one should never adopt a child. I'm adopted. Obviously I look nothing like my parents, but they're still my parents. Personality-wise we're so alike it's freaky.
    My family have always been very open about the whole adopted-child situation, and I am absolutely their "kid."

    I get asked questions about my heritage etc on a weekly basis by customers at work (I work in retail), so it's not a difficult subject.

    Anything you'd like to know? Hit me!
    how does it feel to be the luckiest south korean in the world?
    • #1
    • Thread Starter
    #1

    (Original post by Panzer Division.)
    how does it feel to be the luckiest south korean in the world?
    Laughing.

    (I know at least 3 other South-Koreans who are also adopted.)
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    Thanks for he answers. I rate Norway highly and I think you were very lucky to end up there. One of my friends is Norwegian Wed have things in common.
    If your not too old and you have someone to teach you then id definitely learn Korean. Hopefully you have inherited the European attitude to learning new languages.

    I was watching a BBC drama recently called One Child where the main character was Chinese and adopted following the one child policy. It gave some moderate insights into adoption and relationship with current and biological family. It was a drama thriller.
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    Was there a spate of korean refugees?
    • #1
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    (Original post by 999tigger)
    Thanks for he answers. I rate Norway highly and I think you were very lucky to end up there. One of my friends is Norwegian Wed have things in common.
    If your not too old and you have someone to teach you then id definitely learn Korean. Hopefully you have inherited the European attitude to learning new languages.

    I was watching a BBC drama recently called One Child where the main character was Chinese and adopted following the one child policy. It gave some moderate insights into adoption and relationship with current and biological family. It was a drama thriller.
    I'm 20.
    I'm a quick learner, and (bragging, sorry) am generally seen as a very intelligent person due to vast knowledge, high grades and being a creative person. If I set my mind to it, I think I'd be able to learn Korean or mandarin or something. And I love learning new things so that won't be a problem.
    Some of my friends tend to joke that I'm only smart because I'm (biologically) Asian.


    (Original post by 999tigger)
    Was there a spate of korean refugees?
    Won't say that, no...
    Both my acquaintances and I were adopted because our parents couldn't have or simply didn't want biological children.
    • Very Important Poster
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    Well nice for you for being smart. mandarin if you cna mange it. Was nice to talk to you.
 
 
 
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