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Does cheap wine taste worse than good wine? Watch

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    (Original post by Ethereal World)
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    My mum stocks up on about 5 bottles of those a week for cooking :rofl:
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    With wine, as with so many other things, you pay for what you get, although you don't always get what you pay for.

    Of course, people's palates are different, and (especially with red wine) what is exceptionally good to experienced tasters may not be so interesting to novices. It is an acquired taste. And there are worse problems than finding that your favorite isn't all that expensive.
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    Of course.

    You get what you pay for.

    The difference between a bottle under £10 and a £30 bottle is remarkable.

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    (Original post by tootles44)
    lol at taste testing aldi wines

    not trying to be offensive but I'd hardly have aldi shoppers down as wine connoisseurs :lol:
    Aldi / Lidl actually have some nice bottles of wine. I can't say that I'd be comfortable going and picking one out (because I don't really know enough) but I've been reliably told that you can get good wines pretty cheap (if you're a bit selective)
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    (Original post by tootles44)
    Bit of a duh question but asking coz I dont like the taste of alcohol in general so everything tastes awful to me :lol:

    Any recommendations for a good red wine?
    look for a bottle of rothschild on amazon as the basic ones are about £20 and are very palatable for someone who doesn't drink wine much unless it is sparkling sch as a cava, asti, prosecco, champagne or sweet dessert or fortified wines like vermouth, sherry and port as well as muscat and sauternes
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    (Original post by tootles44)

    Any recommendations for a good red wine?
    As always, it depends on what you want it for. What food, what climate, the taste of the diners/drinkers, etc.

    But there are a few useful places to start on the less-expensive end of things.

    Cotes du Rhone can be good in good vintages. Parallele 45 is a very reliable label by a great producer.

    The best Beaujolais is getting more expensive, but worth seeking out. Easy to drink and food-friendly. Look especially for "cru" Beaujolais, which will actually be named for one of the villages (Brouilly, Morgon, Fleurie, etc.).

    Good value for money can often be had in less-understood regions. Dao (Portugal), Sicily and various parts of southern Italy, even Greece, as a a few example. You need to trust your retailer on that, as shipments come and go and it's hard to keep track of favorites.

    On the high end of the price scale, the obvious benchmarks are Bordeaux and Burgundy. Bordeaux had a number of good vintages through 2010 (and maybe 2015?). For those, the Cru Bourgeois wines can be good value, as a sunny vintage can make the less-expensive plots of land sing. Burgundy is usually less tied to vintage quality, as Pinot Noir is always difficult to get right. So start by finding a producer who is reliable. They will often offer a range of wines from regional/generic up to grand crus from different villages and regions. Jadot and Drouhin are great places to start. Again, this is one place where a good salesman is worth his/her weight in gold.

    Some other regions and styles are reliable but not exciting. Argentinian Malbec always gets good ink in restaurants, but never seems to have much to offer. Merlot (which got bad publicity a few years back) is the base of some of the best Bordeaux, but tends to be made in a boring, commercial style at the low end.of the market.

    Good luck.
 
 
 
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