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    So in my AQA textbook it talks about half cells which makes sense overall, but there is this concept that I don't quite understand. It says:

    "If we dip a rod of metal, into a solution of it's own ions, an equilibrium is set up. For example, dipping zinc into zinc sulfate solution sets up the following equilibrium:
    Zn ⇌ Zn2+ +2e
    The equilibrium will be far to the right. The zinc acquires a negative charge. We say the zinc gains a negative electrical potential. This arrangement is called an electrode."
    (Nelson Thornes A2 Chem, pg 200 If anyone is wondering )

    I don't really get why the equilibrium will be far to the right? Is because of the conditions in which the equilibrium is in? Is it important to understand why and how this equilibrium is set up? If yes I have no idea

    Also why does the Zinc acquire a negative charge when it's clearly releasing electrons? Shouldn't it have a positive charge instead?:confused::confused:
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    (Original post by vanessa53)
    So in my AQA textbook it talks about half cells which makes sense overall, but there is this concept that I don't quite understand. It says:

    "If we dip a rod of metal, into a solution of it's own ions, an equilibrium is set up. For example, dipping zinc into zinc sulfate solution sets up the following equilibrium:
    Zn ⇌ Zn2+ +2e
    The equilibrium will be far to the right. The zinc acquires a negative charge. We say the zinc gains a negative electrical potential. This arrangement is called an electrode."
    (Nelson Thornes A2 Chem, pg 200 If anyone is wondering )

    I don't really get why the equilibrium will be far to the right? Is because of the conditions in which the equilibrium is in? Is it important to understand why and how this equilibrium is set up? If yes I have no idea

    Also why does the Zinc acquire a negative charge when it's clearly releasing electrons? Shouldn't it have a positive charge instead?:confused::confused:
    If the zinc rod releases Zn2+ ions to solution then the electrons released remain on the zinc rod, hence the rod is negatively charged.
 
 
 
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