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    I'm aware this is probably rather easy but i just cant seem to get that answer and it's really irritating me, can someone talk us through it please.

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    (Original post by jackpethick)
    I'm aware this is probably rather easy but i just cant seem to get that answer and it's really irritating me, can someone talk us through it please.

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    What have you tried so far?
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    (Original post by jackpethick)
    I'm aware this is probably rather easy but i just cant seem to get that answer and it's really irritating me, can someone talk us through it please.

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    ***Click on the picture and it goes to a reasonable size***
    Why don't you try differentiating with respect to y so that you get \frac{\mathrm{d}x}{\mathrm{d}y} and then flip them over (reciprocate) to get \frac{\mathrm{d}y}{\mathrm{d}x} You will need to use the chain and product rule to do the differentiation.
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    (Original post by Slowbro93)
    What have you tried so far?
    I tried the chain rule and that didnt work so did the product rule. I'm gonna give it another go now ive left it for 5, literally couldnt seem to get to that answer haha
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    (Original post by jackpethick)
    I'm aware this is probably rather easy but i just cant seem to get that answer and it's really irritating me, can someone talk us through it please.

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Size:  7.9 KB


    ***Click on the picture and it goes to a reasonable size***
    The easiest way to show this is probably using \dfrac{dy}{dx}=1/\dfrac{dx}{dy}.

    EDIT: Oh my so very slow.
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    Why don't you try differentiating with respect to y so that you get \frac{\mathrm{d}x}{\mathrm{d}y} and then flip them over (reciprocate) to get \frac{\mathrm{d}y}{\mathrm{d}x} You will need to use the chain and product rule to do the differentiation.
    It would be useful to see if he's already done that and whether it's the case that he's having an issue with algebra. Start with what they now and work from there.
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    (Original post by jackpethick)
    I tried the chain rule and that didnt work so did the product rule. I'm gonna give it another go now ive left it for 5, literally couldnt seem to get to that answer haha
    Well you'll have to use the chain rule, but have you considered combining it with the product rule. Where is your working?
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    I've worked it out for you, just trying to find out how to post a pic of my solution
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    (Original post by antebellum)
    I've worked it out for you, just trying to find out how to post a pic of my solution
    Please don't, it's best to try to guide the OP to the solution rather than do it for them.
    Besides full solutions except as an absolute last resort are against forum guidelines.
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    (Original post by joostan)
    Please don't, it's best to try to guide the OP to the solution rather than do it for them.
    Well okay then, all they need to do is use a cheeky bit of product rule
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    (Original post by KINGYusuf)
    Yeah it's easy, leme send a pic
    This is a maths forum, Yusuf. Unsolicited **** pics are largely frowned upon.
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    (Original post by antebellum)
    This is a maths forum, Yusuf. Unsolicited **** pics are largely frowned upon.
    LOOOL
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    (Original post by KINGYusuf)
    Yeah it's easy, leme send a pic
    (Original post by joostan)
    Please don't, it's best to try to guide the OP to the solution rather than do it for them.
    Besides full solutions except as an absolute last resort are against forum guidelines.
    :facepalm:
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    (Original post by Student403)
    :facepalm:
    I didn't read that part, mb.
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    (Original post by KINGYusuf)
    I didn't read that part, mb.
    Thanks for deleting it
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    (Original post by jackpethick)
    I tried the chain rule and that didnt work so did the product rule. I'm gonna give it another go now ive left it for 5, literally couldnt seem to get to that answer haha
    You use both the chain rule and product rule. Chain rule first to differentiate the square root term. Then product rule for everything
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    (Original post by Student403)
    Thanks for deleting it
    Student403 the genius himself, what an honour
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    (Original post by Student403)
    Thanks for deleting it
    no sarcasm btw
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    (Original post by KINGYusuf)
    Student403 the genius himself, what an honour
    (Original post by KINGYusuf)
    no sarcasm btw
    >.<
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    (Original post by Student403)
    >.<
    Hey Student, can I PM you a Physics question I'm stuck on? :/
 
 
 
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