How competitive is becoming a solicitor/barrister?

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    Just wondering of how competitive it is to become a lawyer. I've heard it's more competitive to get into chambers and become a barrister? I'm thinking of becoming a solicitor and I just want people's opinions and advice on the matter really.
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    I want to be a barrister and I know its REALLY competitive, my uncle being a barrister.
    You most definitely need a good university degree and that's where to begin from really.
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    Depends where you are in the pecking order. If you are really clever, then its much much easier. Connections also help.
    It also depends what you want to do. Some firms and areas are much more competitive than others.
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    Very competitive these days, especially the Bar... The number of pupillages is decreasing. You need a combination of things but the best things to start with are good grades at GCSE and A level and a degree from a Russell Group university or Oxbridge. Then you need the connections, work experience and personal soft skills.
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    (Original post by 999tigger)
    Depends where you are in the pecking order. If you are really clever, then its much much easier. Connections also help.
    It also depends what you want to do. Some firms and areas are much more competitive than others.
    What exactly do you mean by this? Do you mean like a good degree from a leading university?
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    (Original post by ORW)
    Very competitive these days, especially the Bar... The number of pupillages is decreasing. You need a combination of things but the best things to start with are good grades at GCSE and A level and a degree from a Russell Group university or Oxbridge. Then you need the connections, work experience and personal soft skills.
    What do you mean by 'connections' exactly?
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    (Original post by AndrewKn0x)
    What exactly do you mean by this? Do you mean like a good degree from a leading university?
    depends where you are applying, but yes an excellent degree from a top uni will be an asset. Dont forget the vast majority of people will be smart and high achievers.
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    (Original post by AndrewKn0x)
    What do you mean by 'connections' exactly?
    Connections with lawyers in firms be it a family friend who is a lawyer or one you have met during a networking law fair.
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    Becoming a barrister is more competitive than becoming a solicitor, but becoming a solicitor is still extremely difficult these days. I wouldn't recommend anybody doing law unless they are going to go to a RG/Oxbridge
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    Both options are getting tougher - even if you get a pupillage many are not retained afterwards - barristers are paid peanuts if they rely on legal aid work. Solicitors can now apply for higher rights of audience in court if that is what attracts you. There are more students leaving law school than training contracts - unless you get into commercial work (24/7 culture) salary bands are not great and opportunities for full equity diminishing. Many graduates are working as paralegals. An alternative is the Legal Executive route - a long slog of work and study - but you get pay and experience and opportunities are better than they used to be.
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    (Original post by oli19919)
    Becoming a barrister is more competitive than becoming a solicitor, but becoming a solicitor is still extremely difficult these days. I wouldn't recommend anybody doing law unless they are going to go to a RG/Oxbridge
    I was aiming for Liverpool uni to do it
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    (Original post by rogerdadodger)
    Both options are getting tougher - even if you get a pupillage many are not retained afterwards - barristers are paid peanuts if they rely on legal aid work. Solicitors can now apply for higher rights of audience in court if that is what attracts you. There are more students leaving law school than training contracts - unless you get into commercial work (24/7 culture) salary bands are not great and opportunities for full equity diminishing. Many graduates are working as paralegals. An alternative is the Legal Executive route - a long slog of work and study - but you get pay and experience and opportunities are better than they used to be.
    Thanks for the feedback!
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    (Original post by rogerdadodger)
    Both options are getting tougher - even if you get a pupillage many are not retained afterwards - barristers are paid peanuts if they rely on legal aid work. Solicitors can now apply for higher rights of audience in court if that is what attracts you. There are more students leaving law school than training contracts - unless you get into commercial work (24/7 culture) salary bands are not great and opportunities for full equity diminishing. Many graduates are working as paralegals. An alternative is the Legal Executive route - a long slog of work and study - but you get pay and experience and opportunities are better than they used to be.
    I think this is quite a misleading post giving an overly pessimistic view of becoming a lawyer.

    'Unless you get into commercial work (24/7 culture) salary bands are not great'? This is completely untrue, at a magic circle or large city firm, regardless of your department you will be earning a very healthy salary. The 24/7 your talking about is by all accounts exaggerated and cannot be attributed to 'commercial work' as a whole. Certain departments, perhaps M&A and private equity may have the most and most antisocial hours, but attributing this to 'commercial' is ridiculous.
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    (Original post by AndrewKn0x)
    I was aiming for Liverpool uni to do it
    Liverpool is a Russell Group university, and as mentioned in posts, you need to go to a RG/Oxbridge to have much chance. However, bear in mind Liverpool is often seen as the poor relation in the RG due to its lower entry grades (not just for Law) and high level of leniency on missing those grades in comparison to other RG unis.

    This guide shows where law firms generally like recruiting from...

    http://www.chambersstudent.co.uk/med...university.pdf

    Liverpool does okish in the survey but if you ever aspire to be a commercial/city lawyer then it may not be to your advantage going there
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    Would King's College London, UCL and London school of economics be good choices for university.
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    This video might help the people on this thread.

    (Original post by Fezza101)
    Would King's College London, UCL and London school of economics be good choices for university.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mHc9...qT039q&index=2
 
 
 
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