Turn on thread page Beta

should britain stay in the eu? watch

Announcements
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Zapsta)
    £3 billion a year?
    I think that it is worth it.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Zapsta)
    £3 billion a year?
    when we have a GDP of $1.664 trillion, god knows what that is in GBP, growing at a rate of 2.1%, i dont think £3bil is anything significant enough to cover the losses.

    when at least 35% of imports into this country come from europe alone, (just de, fr, nl, be, it), it's important to have good trade relations with europe.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by vinz)
    when we have a GDP of $1.664 trillion, god knows what that is in GBP, growing at a rate of 2.1%, i dont think £3bil is anything significant enough to cover the losses.

    when at least 35% of imports into this country come from europe alone, (just de, fr, nl, be, it), it's important to have good trade relations with europe.
    Okay... but what's the merit of looking at it compared to GDP? It's money that would have otherwise gone to the government to put towards public sector spending. I'm not going to claim to know how much the government spends each year on the public sector, but even that's not that relevant. With people continually complaining about the state of the NHS and state education, £3 billion is going to make a difference.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by vinz)
    when we have a GDP of $1.664 trillion, god knows what that is in GBP, growing at a rate of 2.1%, i dont think £3bil is anything significant enough to cover the losses.

    when at least 35% of imports into this country come from europe alone, (just de, fr, nl, be, it), it's important to have good trade relations with europe.
    GDP is meerly as measure of total output by UK factors of productiona nd can be used as a measure to estimate a countries wealth. it does not mean that the UK has a disposable 989 billion lying around which could be donated. and is your figure an american trillion or a british trillion, as it seems to differ somewhat from the figures I have.

    your economic knowledge is a shambles and your argument flawed.

    and trade relations with europe will remain workable whether in or out of the Eu due to the mutual benefits all countries recieve. we are already isolated from much of europe and it makes sense to expand trade links with other countries we are closer politically with.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I believe that further EU integration is inevitable whilst we're in the EU. The other major players, France, Germany, etc love these ideas of a federal superstate in which their policies dominate. There are tonnes of examples over the past few years of said countries throwing their weight around, with France sabotaging the CAP reforms before the new countrie joined. Both France and Germany completely letting themselves off with those budget deficits, something they would murder any smaller nation for.

    I wouldn't actually support withdrawal from the EU if it actually came to it because well I'm just not brave enough. But I honestly do think we get absolutely ripped by this inefficient, increasingly demanding little setup we have. The fact that we've now found ourself in a pickle, threatned with economic isolation just says to me that it's nothing more than a political club who are quite willing to practise bad economics. I believe we would suffer somewhat by not having the preferred trade links on the contintent, but at the same time you have to acknowledge that it would be great to be free of that ridiculous CAP, and with all those EU barriers gone we could once again start real free trade with the rest of the world.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by fishpaste)
    I believe that further EU integration is inevitable whilst we're in the EU. The other major players, France, Germany, etc love these ideas of a federal superstate in which their policies dominate. There are tonnes of examples over the past few years of said countries throwing their weight around, with France sabotaging the CAP reforms before the new countrie joined. Both France and Germany completely letting themselves off with those budget deficits, something they would murder any smaller nation for.

    I wouldn't actually support withdrawal from the EU if it actually came to it because well I'm just not brave enough. But I honestly do think we get absolutely ripped by this inefficient, increasingly demanding little setup we have. The fact that we've now found ourself in a pickle, threatned with economic isolation just says to me that it's nothing more than a political club who are quite willing to practise bad economics. I believe we would suffer somewhat by not having the preferred trade links on the contintent, but at the same time you have to acknowledge that it would be great to be free of that ridiculous CAP, and with all those EU barriers gone we could once again start real free trade with the rest of the world.
    exactly.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jumpunderaboat)
    Would cause alot of problems if we were to leave, plus you would need visas to go to places like vienna (where I'm off to later today!)
    I am going there soon too and I am soooo excited .

    On a serious note I really don't see the problem with Britain being in the EU.
    Offline

    14
    there is no question really because they should definatly stay
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by endorf)
    the state of this post would imply you have got no knowledge of economics whatsoever. no evidence of economic terms or justification whatsoever. a poor effort.
    The USA bit is a bit obvious and was something I have read on the web. I will find out the URL when I find it again.

    Yes I'm sorry you got an A in economics you must be ****ing clever :rolleyes: Highly regarded universities offering economic degrees to study don't necessarily want prospective students to have As in economics, it's more likely to be maths.

    Having no economic knowledge like you is not a be all and end all scenario. Why is it that you can be the Chancellor of the Exchequer and have no economic background? :confused:

    You can have all the ecomic knowledge you have like this stupid professor of economic at LSE and come out with crap like saying to abolish job seekers allowance.

    So stop blurring your economic knowledge with your political agenda.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ellie4)
    We should definately stay in it, leaving would be one of the most stupid things Britain's ever done if we do it.
    why?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by vienna95)
    why?
    For the numerous reasons discussed on the previous 4 pages of posts.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    I think Vienna meant it could be a stupid thing if we dropped out of the EU but if it's the most stupid thing then may be that can be argued.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by NDGAARONDI)
    I think Vienna meant it could be a stupid thing if we dropped out of the EU but if it's the most stupid thing then may be that can be argued.
    Well I've discussed my reasons, and how stupid it is on a scale of stupidity is going to be subjective anyway, I'm not about to repeat everything I've already said.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ellie4)
    Apparantly we'll end up having a complete loss of sovereignity, and are heading in the direction of a united states of Europe type affair. It's basically a weak xenophobic argument of "I don't want to be European, I'm British" argument. Idiots don't think about the implication it would have on trade or real issues like that though.
    just for the record, before i launch into a tirade, are you stating that

    i) Britain will transplant no policy making decisions to the EU were a constitution to be ratified?

    ii) the application of a constitution, a single currency and monetary policy, a single military/defence force, a president, a foreign minister, a unifed code of law and judicial system, and a unified legislative body, does not remotely suggest an increasing movement towards a federal state of europe?

    iii) it would not be feasible to negotiate trade agreements on a per country basis were Britain to leave the EU?

    iv) signing the draft EU constitution would benefit Britain economically?
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by vienna95)
    just for the record, before i launch into a tirade, are you stating that

    i) Britain will transplant no policy making decisions to the EU were a constitution to be ratified?

    ii) the application of a constitution, a single currency and monetary policy, a single military/defence force, a president, a foreign minister, a unifed code of law and judicial system, and a unified legislative body, does not remotely suggest an increasing movement towards a federal state of europe?

    iii) it would not be feasible to negotiate trade agreements on a per country basis were Britain to leave the EU?

    iv) signing the draft EU constitution would benefit Britain economically?
    oi vienna, NO!!!!!
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    i) Britain will transplant no policy making decisions to the EU were a constitution to be ratified?
    I'm not talking solely about the constitution, but Britain will certainly have no input into EU policies if we're not in it!

    ii) the application of a constitution, a single currency and monetary policy, a single military/defence force, a president, a foreign minister, a unifed code of law and judicial system, and a unified legislative body, does not remotely suggest an increasing movement towards a federal state of europe?
    There may well one day be a federal state, but that doesn't mean Britain has to be part of it. We still have our own currency, our monetary policy, our defence force, our PM, our judicial system etc etc. Europe isn't saying that we can't. If further down the line, these things become obligatory, then by all means the UK can use the part of the constitution that says we can withdraw from the EU at any time. But those things haven't happened yet, so why withdraw now?

    iii) it would not be feasible to negotiate trade agreements on a per country basis were Britain to leave the EU?
    Yes it would, but we would not have the same trade agreement that we currently have, and with more than half of the UK's trade occuring within the EU, this would have a serious effect on our trade.

    iv) signing the draft EU constitution would benefit Britain economically?
    No, but I think not signing the constitution is going to place the UK in a very weak position.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Reminds me of Thatcher's speech at Brussels commenting on the EU. Forget how it goes but it ended no no no.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ellie4)
    For the numerous reasons discussed on the previous 4 pages of posts.
    ive read them..and im still asking why?

    for instance, you dont believe the EU is "heading in the direction of a united states of Europe type affair.", but then assert that the same EU is required to counter US power. can you explain that?

    secondly, within a matter of decades the US will have a GDP over twice that of the EU, average popn age of just over 30 compared to 45 in the EU and a pension level of approximately 40% , compared to the 60% plus of the EU. bearing in mind the US taxpayer is paying for EU defence and would surely withdraw it, forcing EU defence spending up, im interested to see how the EU could actually continue to wield any political or economic power with the consequences of time..
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by NDGAARONDI)
    The USA bit is a bit obvious and was something I have read on the web. I will find out the URL when I find it again.

    Yes I'm sorry you got an A in economics you must be ****ing clever :rolleyes: Highly regarded universities offering economic degrees to study don't necessarily want prospective students to have As in economics, it's more likely to be maths.

    Having no economic knowledge like you is not a be all and end all scenario. Why is it that you can be the Chancellor of the Exchequer and have no economic background? :confused:

    You can have all the ecomic knowledge you have like this stupid professor of economic at LSE and come out with crap like saying to abolish job seekers allowance.

    So stop blurring your economic knowledge with your political agenda.
    i was meerly commenting on the fact that you have brought nothing to this debate whatsoever. at least i offer an opinion and support it with facts and figures.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    can you edit the quotes please.
 
 
 
Poll
Do you think parents should charge rent?
Useful resources

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.