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Drivers - Would you pass a driving test again? Watch

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    I was thinking about this today, and I don't think I would.

    I have serious trouble sticking to the speed limit; I drive with only one hand on the wheel most of the time; I never check my side mirrors unless I have to; I accelerate quite harshly sometimes by way of aggression to get into gaps in traffic (not in a way that would cause other road users to physically react of course); I speed up to get past amber lights before they turn red; I "cut across" mini roundabouts; and I've become so confident in my parking that I move a lot faster than the examiner would like.

    Still, my braking and following distances are good, at least
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    (Original post by WoodyMKC)
    I was thinking about this today, and I don't think I would.

    I have serious trouble sticking to the speed limit; I drive with only one hand on the wheel most of the time; I never check my side mirrors unless I have to; I accelerate quite harshly sometimes by way of aggression to get into gaps in traffic (not in a way that would cause other road users to physically react of course); I speed up to get past amber lights before they turn red; I "cut across" mini roundabouts; and I've become so confident in my parking that I move a lot faster than the examiner would like.

    Still, my braking and following distances are good, at least
    I agree tbh xD It's only been about 8 months I think since I passed my test, but still, I think for a lot of people, as soon as you pass, good habits go out the window...

    Give me a few days of decent driving to get back into all the habits, and to practice the manoeuvres (a lot!), and I might...
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    It's been a long time since I've passed my test but I would be confident I'd be able to pass. Maybe I wouldn't do things exactly in the expected way but I feel the most important thing is to demonstrate you are a safe driver. Yes, I have bad habits but I don't think they're so hardwired into me I'd let that slip me up on a test. Heck, there are times I have passengers that just wish for a smooth and non-dizzy ride (esp elderly), I'm able to switch driving styles easily.

    Sorry but I think if you're not able to control your driving style and neglect mirror checks, only doing them when you think "you have to ", I don't think you're fit to be on the road as you're a danger to other users. Living in central London, the people drive very aggressively here. You'd be a fool to neglect observation, there's people changing lanes, lurking in your blind spots, pulling out quickly from a side road, no signals, people overtaking you, buses and cyclists and motorcycle users weaving in and out etc. People and things appear out of nowhere, simple as that.

    People don't expect you to drive by the book, but you need to be able to take the same principles and form an equivalent in your driving style. Some people complain about the outrageous insurance prices for young drivers but with these kind of examples of bad driving, it's not really any wonder as to why the prices are as they are.
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    iv not even passed yet and i have major trouble with clutch control. dont think il ever pass!
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    I passed a year and a half ago. Haven't driven since.

    Will probably need a few sessions to get back into it.

    If I took it again today I would stand no chance.
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    (Original post by NX172)
    It's been a long time since I've passed my test but I would be confident I'd be able to pass. Maybe I wouldn't do things exactly in the expected way but I feel the most important thing is to demonstrate you are a safe driver. Yes, I have bad habits but I don't think they're so hardwired into me I'd let that slip me up on a test. Heck, there are times I have passengers that just wish for a smooth and non-dizzy ride (esp elderly), I'm able to switch driving styles easily.

    Sorry but I think if you're not able to control your driving style and neglect mirror checks, only doing them when you think "you have to ", I don't think you're fit to be on the road as you're a danger to other users. Living in central London, the people drive very aggressively here. You'd be a fool to neglect observation, there's people changing lanes, lurking in your blind spots, pulling out quickly from a side road, no signals, people overtaking you, buses and cyclists and motorcycle users weaving in and out etc. People and things appear out of nowhere, simple as that.

    People don't expect you to drive by the book, but you need to be able to take the same principles and form an equivalent in your driving style. Some people complain about the outrageous insurance prices for young drivers but with these kind of examples of bad driving, it's not really any wonder as to why the prices are as they are.
    I disagree with you in some respects... a lot of people I know don't check their mirrors all the time (as much as you should in a test), and I can't remember the last time I was driven somewhere that the person hasn't sped at some point. Doing this doesn't necessarily make you a bad driver... My mum has been driving for around 30 years, and the only time she's been in a 'crash' was when someone reversed into her in a car park, and she doesn't drive as you should in a driving test.

    I would agree about central London though... hell to drive... Driving is as much about driving to the conditions as it is about being able to control the car - in central london, I'd check my mirrors etc a lot more than I do when I usually drive, because driving where I live is nothing like driving in London...
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    Having only passed recently and driving quite regularly, I probably would. Although, I drive an automatic car even though my test was manual, so I might need to have a few lessons to get used to it again!
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    Driving yeah, theory definitely not
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    (Original post by mobbsy91)
    I disagree with you in some respects... a lot of people I know don't check their mirrors all the time (as much as you should in a test), and I can't remember the last time I was driven somewhere that the person hasn't sped at some point. Doing this doesn't necessarily make you a bad driver... My mum has been driving for around 30 years, and the only time she's been in a 'crash' was when someone reversed into her in a car park, and she doesn't drive as you should in a driving test.

    I would agree about central London though... hell to drive... Driving is as much about driving to the conditions as it is about being able to control the car - in central london, I'd check my mirrors etc a lot more than I do when I usually drive, because driving where I live is nothing like driving in London...
    It doesn't take a crash to prove someone is not driving well. All it takes is an impact on another driver to react to your maneuver to cause a possible accident as their situation is going to be different to yours, they could be perfectly safe or more vulnerable. Neither did I say you should drive as you are expected to by the book on a daily basis. For example, checking mirrors on every new road may be excessive, but knowing to check mirrors when you know there is a possibility of cyclists or motorcycle being on either side would be appropriate and not excessive.

    I didn't mention speed as it's a grey area.
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    (Original post by NX172)
    It doesn't take a crash to prove someone is not driving well. All it takes is an impact on another driver to react to your maneuver to cause a possible accident as their situation is going to be different to yours, they could be perfectly safe or more vulnerable. Neither did I say you should drive as you are expected to by the book on a daily basis. For example, checking mirrors on every new road may be excessive, but knowing to check mirrors when you know there is a possibility of cyclists or motorcycle being on either side would be appropriate and not excessive.
    Yes, but in a test you are expected to check the mirrors constantly, as well as other things. If someone was being re-tested (dependent on whether it's to say whether they can continue driving or just for the hell of it...), if the test mattered, it would be very easy for them to fall back into their habits, potentially under nerves, and drive with one hand on the wheel, not fully check speed, etc...

    Whilst these things are let's be honest, safe to do whilst normally driving, a build up of these would get you failed... It's very easy to say, 'Yeh, I would hold the wheel with both hands" or "I would constantly check the mirrors", but if you were going from having driven with one hand on the wheel, not constantly checking mirrors, into a stressful situation where you could lose your license if you didn't pass, then you could very easily revert to habits, and fail. It doesn't make you a bad driver, it just means that you don't drive in a robot fashion.

    I didn't mention speed as it's a grey area.
    Arguably it's not. Speeding in a test will get you failed... You shouldn't ever speed... We all do, but hey, it's good fun as well
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    (Original post by mobbsy91)
    Arguably it's not. Speeding in a test will get you failed... You shouldn't ever speed... We all do, but hey, it's good fun as well
    Speed is only dangerous if other road users around you are going either faster or slower than you. Either they become an obstacle, or you become someone else's obstacle. Therefore, going too slowly is just as dangerous as someone going too quickly. Some examples, in London, if there's a 30MPH area that is pretty much a long straight with little housing nearby, most people wouldn't stick to 30, it'd be closer to 35-40MPH in reality. If everyone is going the same speed and adjusts their spacing to account for the additional braking required then nobody becomes an obstacle. In most cases, there will be a need to stop quickly, such as for buses pulling out. In which case it would be inappropriate to speed on this road.

    With motorways, speed limits such as 70MPH are highly outdated, the average car has far superior braking distances compared to decades ago.
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    (Original post by NX172)
    Speed is only dangerous if other road users around you are going either faster or slower than you. Either they become an obstacle, or you become someone else's obstacle. Therefore, going too slowly is just as dangerous as someone going too quickly. Some examples, in London, if there's a 30MPH area that is pretty much a long straight with little housing nearby, most people wouldn't stick to 30, it'd be closer to 35-40MPH in reality. If everyone is going the same speed then nobody becomes an obstacle.

    With motorways, speed limits such as 70MPH are highly outdated, the average car has far superior breaking distances compared to decades ago.
    In your first paragraph, I would say that it's those going above 30, who're being more dangerous (depending on conditions...), than someone sticking at the limit... Not just road users, but if someone fell into the road, then going at 30 is a lot safer than going at 35-40...

    Motorway speed limits piss me off sooooo much!!! The people who sit in the left lane are usually going at a speed less than 70 anyway, and most other users are going above it from my experience... (except bloody average speed cameras!! ). In the MHoC actually, we passed a Bill to make motorway speed limits 80MPH - much above that, and you'd need to then start looking at increasing the width of lanes on some motorways...
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    (Original post by mobbsy91)
    In your first paragraph, I would say that it's those going above 30, who're being more dangerous (depending on conditions...), than someone sticking at the limit... Not just road users, but if someone fell into the road, then going at 30 is a lot safer than going at 35-40...
    As for hazards and speeding, rarely do things just happen out of the blue, usually there is a build up to the event, this is where observation comes in. Someone with good observation skills and fast reactions are obviously more in control of their vehicle at higher speeds than someone who lacks both. Most probably don't have both, which is why it's better to just settle with a lower speed limit for everyone. Someone with reactions of a brick going under the speed limit is still just as likely to cause an accident. On the otherhand, most young drivers are confident they have good reactions and can control the car at high speed but many lack the observation skills which makes them dangerous.
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    (Original post by NX172)
    As for hazards and speeding, rarely do things just happen out of the blue, usually there is a build up to the event, this is where observation comes in. Someone with good observation skills and fast reactions are obviously more in control of their vehicle at higher speeds than someone who lacks both. Most probably don't have both, which is why it's better to just settle with a lower speed limit for everyone. Someone with reactions of a brick going under the speed limit is still just as likely to cause an accident. On the otherhand, most young drivers are confident they have good reactions and can control the car at high speed but many lack the observation skills which makes them dangerous.
    It is rare, but when it happens... [insert car crash emoji here]. Yeh, of course, but that's why we don't have 60MPH limits on the motorway... we're never going to be able to cater to everyone's different skills about observing...

    I definitely agree that someone driving much slower than the speed limit is very dangerous, but it's wrong to say that just because (almost) everyone drives at 40 in a 30, the guy driving at 30 is being dangerous.
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    (Original post by mobbsy91)
    I definitely agree that someone driving much slower than the speed limit is very dangerous, but it's wrong to say that just because (almost) everyone drives at 40 in a 30, the guy driving at 30 is being dangerous.
    I don't think anyone driving at or just below a speed limit could ever by classified as dangerous
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    (Original post by NX172)
    I don't think anyone driving at or just below a speed limit could ever by classified as dangerous
    Well... in your own example, when most people wouldn't stick to 30, going at 10mph below everyone else could be potentially dangerous.
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    (Original post by mobbsy91)
    Well... in your own example, when most people wouldn't stick to 30, going at 10mph below everyone else could be potentially dangerous.
    It's about anticipation as well. Most people driving on a 30 Road would anticipate and account for people driving up to 40. But would not anticipate someone cruising at 17MPH. (That hasn't been made obvious from a maneuver such as pulling out onto main road or signalling). If I'm driving 40 on a 30 road, expecting some people to go 30 is completely expected.
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    (Original post by NX172)
    It's been a long time since I've passed my test but I would be confident I'd be able to pass. Maybe I wouldn't do things exactly in the expected way but I feel the most important thing is to demonstrate you are a safe driver. Yes, I have bad habits but I don't think they're so hardwired into me I'd let that slip me up on a test. Heck, there are times I have passengers that just wish for a smooth and non-dizzy ride (esp elderly), I'm able to switch driving styles easily.

    Sorry but I think if you're not able to control your driving style and neglect mirror checks, only doing them when you think "you have to ", I don't think you're fit to be on the road as you're a danger to other users. Living in central London, the people drive very aggressively here. You'd be a fool to neglect observation, there's people changing lanes, lurking in your blind spots, pulling out quickly from a side road, no signals, people overtaking you, buses and cyclists and motorcycle users weaving in and out etc. People and things appear out of nowhere, simple as that.

    People don't expect you to drive by the book, but you need to be able to take the same principles and form an equivalent in your driving style. Some people complain about the outrageous insurance prices for young drivers but with these kind of examples of bad driving, it's not really any wonder as to why the prices are as they are.
    Re: mirrors, I see all those situations you described as "have to". Obviously I'm not going to switch lanes or make manouvres without checking to see what's there first, that'd be rather silly. However, in a test you're expected to constantly check your mirrors in all manner of situations and constantly throughout - if any experienced driver said their mirror-checking is up to test standard they'd very likely be disillusioned IMO.
 
 
 
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