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Do Muslims have a responsibility to address radicalism? watch

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    I personally would say no. But regardless it would certainly be extraordinarily helpful if they all came together to do so. Extremism grows up within their own religious community, and no one is in a better position to nip it in the bud than fellow Muslims, and especially Islamic authorities such as Imams. Although they have no responsibility as individuals to address this problem, it most certainly does relate to them in some respect, so it's annoying when Muslims scoff or scorn the idea that they should attempt to help address the problem, because it's plain to see that they have a greater opportunity than anyone to do something that might really help. So it's a shame to see that so many seem genuinely quite smug about squandering such an opportunity. Ok, you don't care. But why be proud of that?

    Props to Qualliam and Maajid Nawaz, the world needs more like you.
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    they do in part i would say - they cannot solve the problem enitirely by themselves, but they can do more.

    but more importantly, what they shouldnt instead feel, is the obligation to strive to convince everyone else that islamic doctrine is not being used to radicalise and inspire nutters too commit attrocities. no one will swallow that and in fact this mis-direction simply keeps the means for radicalisation open and active for all islalmists to use.
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    Many already do. I can recall how a lovely lady who was affected by the 7/7 London Bombing came into school to give us a talk about Islamophobia and radicalization. And I do think she had an impact on us all.
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    I think that the Muslim community can make a massive difference and can certainly play a significant role in tackling radicalisation. However, they shouldn't feel as though it's their responsibility to deal with people who, quite frankly, are pretty sick (in the sense that they believe in some pretty horrible things). I think if a more liberal interpretation is promoted and more is done to help people who are vulnerable (people who have had a tough upbringing or people who feel as though their lives have no purpose maybe due to gangs, drugs etc.) then maybe we could see some change. I find that it's often people who weren't so religious who suddenly turn around and become extremists so maybe scholars can try and get in touch with these kind of people who may do this 180 degree turn.
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    As a Muslim, I feel like with the ongoing progression of radicalism, the more we have defended ourselves the more we look guilty. Our response remains the same in light of any act of radicalism and now it has become monotonous and mediocre for non-Muslims.
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    (Original post by Saltedcaramel1)
    As a Muslim, I feel like with the ongoing progression of radicalism, the more we have defended ourselves the more we look guilty. Our response remains the same in light of any act of radicalism and now it has become monotonous and mediocre for non-Muslims.
    the OP is not asking for muslims to 'defend islam' or deny responsibility , it is to accept some level of responsibility and address the problems that their doctrine is causing
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    (Original post by Reformed)
    the OP is not asking for muslims to 'defend islam' or deny responsibility , it is to accept some level of responsibility and address the problems that their doctrine is causing
    addressing the problem, defending the religion. you say potato I say potato, same difference.
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    Those people are under the radar how can you know if someone is radical they are not going to tell you to your face
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    (Original post by Legendary Quest)
    I think that the Muslim community can make a massive difference and can certainly play a significant role in tackling radicalisation. However, they shouldn't feel as though it's their responsibility to deal with people who, quite frankly, are pretty sick (in the sense that they believe in some pretty horrible things). I think if a more liberal interpretation is promoted and more is done to help people who are vulnerable (people who have had a tough upbringing or people who feel as though their lives have no purpose maybe due to gangs, drugs etc.) then maybe we could see some change. I find that it's often people who weren't so religious who suddenly turn around and become extremists so maybe scholars can try and get in touch with these kind of people who may do this 180 degree turn.
    Well said :congrats:.
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    The issue with some suggestions here is that non-Muslims, hypocritical Muslims and ex-Muslims want to push foreward a liberal branded interpretation of Islam, but in reality the majority of the Muslim community looks at such things with scorn (e.g. how the majority of us hate Majid Nawaz), fueling their already unfavourable views on how the West interacts with Muslims. The knock on effect of this is ironically more discontentment within the community which could lead more Muslims to adopt views which are deamed to be 'radical' or 'extreme'.

    Going back to the question however, I know Muslims personally who I think have spoken of times where they have had to talk down other Muslims who were starting to incline towards extremism, and other times where they have encouraged peaceful interaction with non-Muslims and other Muslims in their Friday sermons, so I would say that Muslims do actually try to help but these things are not really spoken about often and therefore are less obvious to non-Muslims who are under the impression that Muslims don't do enough.
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    (Original post by Saltedcaramel1)
    addressing the problem, defending the religion. you say potato I say potato, same difference.
    two different things. europe didnt address nazism by defending ideologies of mein kampf
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    (Original post by KingBradly)
    I personally would say no. But regardless it would certainly be extraordinarily helpful if they all came together to do so. Extremism grows up within their own religious community, and no one is in a better position to nip it in the bud than fellow Muslims, and especially Islamic authorities such as Imams. Although they have no responsibility as individuals to address this problem, it most certainly does relate to them in some respect, so it's annoying when Muslims scoff or scorn the idea that they should attempt to help address the problem, because it's plain to see that they have a greater opportunity than anyone to do something that might really help. So it's a shame to see that so many seem genuinely quite smug about squandering such an opportunity. Ok, you don't care. But why be proud of that?

    Props to Qualliam and Maajid Nawaz, the world needs more like you.
    The biggest Sunni Muslim authority, Al-Azhar, has already addressed radicalism many times.
    http://egyptianstreets.com/2016/03/2...error-attacks/
    Muslims worldwide are condemning this, but peace is not what the media gets views out of, thus you will never see stuff like this in the media.
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    (Original post by KingBradly)
    I personally would say no. But regardless it would certainly be extraordinarily helpful if they all came together to do so. Extremism grows up within their own religious community, and no one is in a better position to nip it in the bud than fellow Muslims, and especially Islamic authorities such as Imams. Although they have no responsibility as individuals to address this problem, it most certainly does relate to them in some respect, so it's annoying when Muslims scoff or scorn the idea that they should attempt to help address the problem, because it's plain to see that they have a greater opportunity than anyone to do something that might really help. So it's a shame to see that so many seem genuinely quite smug about squandering such an opportunity. Ok, you don't care. But why be proud of that?

    Props to Qualliam and Maajid Nawaz, the world needs more like you.
    So would you seek from Muslims, the condemnation and opposition to the parts of Islamic scripture, that gives rise to and justify, what many may consider to be reprehensible beliefs and actions? i.e. enslaving men, women and children, sex slavery, human trafficking, cruel and unusual punishments, FGM, contempt for disbelievers, homophobia, persecution of vocal apostates/critics of Islam, gender/religious discrimination and so on... (Bearing in mind, how dear many Muslims hold their scripture)

    Because I'm assuming there will likely be some Muslims who would be very reluctant to condemn and oppose the above and would rather instead provide apologetics for the above. Should this also be addressed?
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    So called 'moderates' are just as much the problem, equally culpable in my eyes.

    They all propagate the same book as fact, it's widely known that a very real, and plausible, interpretation of that book is calling for the death and subjugation of non-believers.

    If I might pose a hypothetical. If a person, however well intentioned or misinformed, is openly calling others to enslave your family and murder you then this person is surely an enemy. More a problem than the ones who would take action, equally as culpable. If enemy is to mean anything, it applies here. If it doesn't then I would ask what a person has to do, for you to use the word enemy.

    It really doesn't matter if the person is ignorant of what they are doing, on some philosophical level I'm sure their motivations matter, pragmatically it just not feasible or prudent to entertain the notion.
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    (Original post by KingBradly)
    I personally would say no. But regardless it would certainly be extraordinarily helpful if they all came together to do so. Extremism grows up within their own religious community, and no one is in a better position to nip it in the bud than fellow Muslims, and especially Islamic authorities such as Imams. Although they have no responsibility as individuals to address this problem, it most certainly does relate to them in some respect, so it's annoying when Muslims scoff or scorn the idea that they should attempt to help address the problem, because it's plain to see that they have a greater opportunity than anyone to do something that might really help. So it's a shame to see that so many seem genuinely quite smug about squandering such an opportunity. Ok, you don't care. But why be proud of that?

    Props to Qualliam and Maajid Nawaz, the world needs more like you.
    I don't get it? We have some terrorists and out of all the groups in the world you lay the responsibility on Muslims? How are Muslims requried to sort this out?

    Terrorism had nothing to do with Muslims or Islam and there is no connection whatsoever. It just seems random you would put the responsibility on a random group like Muslims. Weird
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    (Original post by al_94)
    Those people are under the radar how can you know if someone is radical they are not going to tell you to your face
    generally as soon as someone conflates islam with politics - they are well on the road to radicalisation
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    Yes, it would be nice.
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    Absolutely. I think it's disgusting how abdeslam was walking around for 4 months before his capture. Not one of them reported him
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    As far as I'm concerned they certainly do not have a responsibility to do so.

    The very idea that they do is laughable.


    Fortunately it seems that most of them understand this.

    Few things **** me off more than one group of people telling another group what they should think or say or do.

    If I was a Muslim and some atheist told me I should be doing more I'd tell them to **** off.
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    (Original post by KingBradly)
    I personally would say no. But regardless it would certainly be extraordinarily helpful if they all came together to do so. Extremism grows up within their own religious community, and no one is in a better position to nip it in the bud than fellow Muslims, and especially Islamic authorities such as Imams. Although they have no responsibility as individuals to address this problem, it most certainly does relate to them in some respect, so it's annoying when Muslims scoff or scorn the idea that they should attempt to help address the problem, because it's plain to see that they have a greater opportunity than anyone to do something that might really help. So it's a shame to see that so many seem genuinely quite smug about squandering such an opportunity. Ok, you don't care. But why be proud of that?

    Props to Qualliam and Maajid Nawaz, the world needs more like you.
    Well said my man. At the same time, all Irish people ought to get together and take down the IRA. All priests should get together and stop the paedo priests. I could go on forever, This idea "muslims should stop extremism" isn't plausible. Terrorists are a minority in our communities and they look exactly like the next Muslim. They are not open with their plans because they know that if they WERE open about their ideas, they would get reported/beaten up at the mosque.

    Stop trying to fuel a hatred towards muslims.

    FYIl Majid Nawaz and Quilliam don't do anything meaningful towards stopping extremism, They are just against religious observance in general and are trying to stop people practicing mainstream Islam. They are rejected by 95% of muslims because they are trying to reform the religion. There are no credible statistics to show that the work they do is actually stopping extremism.
 
 
 
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