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    the last thing on the spec(wjec) is nmr and we just did it in class before the holidays. no matter what i do i dont get it!! i dont need to know anything about splitting so thankfully i dont have to worry about it ! i dont know what it is im not doing right.
    can someone go through it with me pls, especially how to identify environment and the chemical shift (ik its easy but i cant do it).
    everyone else in my class can do it and its really frustrating me. when i ask the teach to go through it with me he keeps saying that i need to pay attention to him but i am, i just dont know what im doing wrong and im getting soo stressed about this
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    (Original post by Exotic-L)
    the last thing on the spec(wjec) is nmr and we just did it in class before the holidays. no matter what i do i dont get it!! i dont need to know anything about splitting so thankfully i dont have to worry about it ! i dont know what it is im not doing right.
    can someone go through it with me pls, especially how to identify environment and the chemical shift (ik its easy but i cant do it).
    everyone else in my class can do it and its really frustrating me. when i ask the teach to go through it with me he keeps saying that i need to pay attention to him but i am, i just dont know what im doing wrong and im getting soo stressed about this
    You should have a data table to match chemical shift to different parts of the molecule under investigation. Equivalent environments arise due to symmetry in the molecule really. If you want my PP from when I teach this to my students then PM me an email address.
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    (Original post by TeachChemistry)
    You should have a data table to match chemical shift to different parts of the molecule under investigation. Equivalent environments arise due to symmetry in the molecule really. If you want my PP from when I teach this to my students then PM me an email address.
    thank you soo much for the reply ! i will send you my email address
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    how many environments are there in CH3CH2CH2CH2OH 4 or 5? im confused about the the CH2's on the left
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    (Original post by Exotic-L)
    how many environments are there in CH3CH2CH2CH2OH 4 or 5? im confused about the the CH2's on the left
    4 C environments and 5 H environments
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    (Original post by TeachChemistry)
    4 C environments and 5 H environments
    thank you!!
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    (Original post by TeachChemistry)
    You should have a data table to match chemical shift to different parts of the molecule under investigation. Equivalent environments arise due to symmetry in the molecule really. If you want my PP from when I teach this to my students then PM me an email address.
    Would it be possible if you could send it to me too? I get NMR for the most part, but it's the final stages and identifying Carbon environments which I can't really grasp
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    (Original post by KaylaB)
    Would it be possible if you could send it to me too? I get NMR for the most part, but it's the final stages and identifying Carbon environments which I can't really grasp
    Yes. PM me an email address.
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    sorry to be a pain but can you explain the c and proton environments of benzene and phenol thank you
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    (Original post by Exotic-L)
    sorry to be a pain but can you explain the c and proton environments of benzene and phenol thank you
    In benzene all the C and all the H are exactly the same. If you rotated the molecule by 60 degrees on a page it would look exactly the same - it's the symmetry that does this.

    In the phenol let'[s call the OH bearing carbon position 1 then go clockwise round the ring numbering the carbons until you get to number 6. Number 2 and number 6 are identical as are number 3 and number 5. Number 1 is on its own and number 4 is on its own. Therefore there are 4 carbon peaks because there are 4 different carbon environments. There will also be 4 H environments. The symmetry element here is a 180 degrees rotation about an axis through C1 and C4 (or think of it as a mirror reflection).

    Any clearer?
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    (Original post by Exotic-L)
    sorry to be a pain but can you explain the c and proton environments of benzene and phenol thank you
    I've emailed you a homework sheet about environments. Have a go.
 
 
 
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