Should I learn the muscles of the forearm? Watch

Tronick
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I'm currently cramming for year 1 exams. Is it an efficient use of my time to learn all the muscles of the anterior and posterior forearm? It would probably take me at least a day and then regular repetition after that, and I doubt I'll retain the knowledge the day after the exam. Obviously knowing them is better than not knowing them, but can one of you wise owl's tell me whether they're essential or not?
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ForestCat
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(Original post by Tronick)
I'm currently cramming for year 1 exams. Is it an efficient use of my time to learn all the muscles of the anterior and posterior forearm? It would probably take me at least a day and then regular repetition after that, and I doubt I'll retain the knowledge the day after the exam. Obviously knowing them is better than not knowing them, but can one of you wise owl's tell me whether they're essential or not?
Although anatomy becomes less important later on (unless you're a surgeon), you do need to have an idea of the basics. You will need to know the arm muscles, so just bite the bullet and learn them. The arm isn't that bad.

EDIT: I assume you have been taught them in the first place?
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Rhetorical Hips
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(Original post by Tronick)
I'm currently cramming for year 1 exams. Is it an efficient use of my time to learn all the muscles of the anterior and posterior forearm? It would probably take me at least a day and then regular repetition after that, and I doubt I'll retain the knowledge the day after the exam. Obviously knowing them is better than not knowing them, but can one of you wise owl's tell me whether they're essential or not?
Surely it depends on whether your med school exams will expect you to know them or not? Good luck with your cramming by the way - I've put off learning the posterior forearm for a few weeks, so many bloody muscles :lol:
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Crystal_Heart
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(Original post by Tronick)
I'm currently cramming for year 1 exams. Is it an efficient use of my time to learn all the muscles of the anterior and posterior forearm? It would probably take me at least a day and then regular repetition after that, and I doubt I'll retain the knowledge the day after the exam. Obviously knowing them is better than not knowing them, but can one of you wise owl's tell me whether they're essential or not?
Probably depends on your med school. I found the videos on Youtube by Dr Preddy - An easy way to remember arm muscles Part 1 and Part 2, really helpful when learning them. It breaks it down and makes it a bit more memorable!
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nexttime
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Depends on whether they're in your syllabus. Obviously. We were not expected to know them but you may well be.
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Ghotay
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Echoing the above posters really

The most efficent use of your time when revising is always to cover the explicitly taughter material first and foremost. We were not taught the muscles of the forearm more than as a vague overview when learning the innervation of the upper limb. I never learnt them and don't think I was ever questioned on them. If you have explicitly covered them in your anatomy sessions, then absolutely learn them. If not, don't bother. In my experience there is always enough to cover in the syllabus that learning extra stuff is rarely worth it
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MonteCristo
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I agree with the others that this depends on how your medical school examines students. Not knowing the anatomy of the forearm is unlikely to stop you passing an overarching written exam but could be fatal in an anatomy viva.

Is it really that difficult to learn, though? It might look like a lot of latin names with endless origins and insertions but they follow some pretty logical rules. You don't have to learn the anatomy of the forearm in minute detail to know the anatomy of the forearm...

Flexors are largely median nerve and arise from the medial epicondyle; extensors are all radial nerve and arise from the lateral epicondyle. The insertion of each muscle tells you its function and lets you have a pretty good stab at its name as well. The muscles/tendons are only pulleys and so, if they cross a joint, they will either flex/extend that joint. There are then a small number of anatomical oddities (FDP part median part ulnar nerve, pronator quadratus isn't a flexor, etc) to memorise for completion.

My feeling is that, if this takes more than an hour to learn, then you are probably overcomplicating the anatomy. If you try to learn the multiple origins and insertions of every muscle in some abstract sense, then it will take a lot of repetition and be easily forgotten. Even if you are not naturally a visual learner, it is very difficult to learn anatomy in the abstract, e.g. as a list of little details.
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SimpsP
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At Leeds we had a whole exam on the muscles of the arm... So count yourself lucky
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