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    I'm not going to a uni where it's high on the league tables but it's in the top 30, would this even allow me to have a job earning at least 50k or more a year if have a lot of experience and a first at university? It would I be stuck with 20k a year because my university isn't prestigious enough or in the top 10.
    Can anyone help?
    Thank you


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    (Original post by cutelady)
    I'm not going to a uni where it's high on the league tables but it's in the top 30, would this even allow me to have a job earning at least 50k or more a year if have a lot of experience and a first at university? It would I be stuck with 20k a year because my university isn't prestigious enough or in the top 10.
    Can anyone help?
    Thank you


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    I'm moving this into our careers forum
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    (Original post by cutelady)
    I'm not going to a uni where it's high on the league tables but it's in the top 30, would this even allow me to have a job earning at least 50k or more a year if have a lot of experience and a first at university? It would I be stuck with 20k a year because my university isn't prestigious enough or in the top 10.
    Can anyone help?
    Thank you


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    Your earnings are more dependent on what industry you decide to enter rather than what university you attend. It's just that higher paying careers tend to be highly correlated with the top universities. Only a handful of jobs pay £50,000 to a graduate. Majority are way, way lower. And those high paying jobs would require significant experience whilst at university since competition would be high.

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    People with a first in Mathematics from Oxford have an average starting salary of less than 50k


    go figure
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    (Original post by Kashmir Skirt)
    People with a first in Mathematics from Oxford have an average starting salary of less than 50k


    go figure
    oxford are **** for maths tho :mmm:


    plus that's just the starting salary literally 12 months after graduation, and many go into teaching/academia, etc.
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    (Original post by Hasbara Habibi)
    oxford are **** for maths tho :mmm:


    plus that's just the starting salary literally 12 months after graduation, and many go into teaching/academia, etc.
    Some guy posted the top 10 starting salaries, Oxford Mathematics was top.


    The last bit I accept drags the average down, nobody goes into teaching or academia for the money
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    No I'm not talking about after I graduate, I'm talking about after 6 years or so and I'm doing economics at Kent or Sussex


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    It really does depend on what career you chose to go into, banking and finance jobs tend to pay the largest salaries for an economics degree. It tends not to matter too much (as long as its a good one) which university you go to but more if you can get a first class degree or not, if you can get a first you will quite easily get a job in most places (providing you have some experience and are interesting enough to get yourself through the internet stage). This would definitely increase your chances of getting 50k in about 6 years or at least close to it. But you should also consider whether the amount of money you will get is worth going into these careers as you will not get 50k a year doing 9 to 5.
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    (Original post by Kashmir Skirt)
    Some guy posted the top 10 starting salaries, Oxford Mathematics was top.
    really? that's strange because cambridge maths > oxford maths (easily). if i had to guess, id say that's because a higher proportion of those doing maths at cambridge enter academia/teaching compared to those at oxford.
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    OP, your earnings depend on what job you land. Studying economics doesn't actually translate into anything job-wise, it's a general academic degree. If you want lots of money, you better be at a target/semi-target uni and have a solid CV + good personality to stand a chance at the jobs that pay £50k base starting (front office IB).. Even top strategy consulting firms only come in at the £38-45k base range starting and they're arguably more elitist than FO IB.

    If this is a Q about eventually making that figure, then joining a Big4 firm in Audit (starting c.£28-29k) and leaving to an industry role in London after your 3 years training/ACA qualification could yield £50k. Or alternatively normal management consulting at a Big4/Accenture etc. EDIT: corporate law can also yield this level of income, but you'll need to be a strong enough candidate to land a training contract. Downside is you'll be studying for another 1.5 to 2 years for GDL and LPC.

    Progression in other fields is nowhere near as favourable or steep as the above routes but you have to remember it's not always about the money. You have to enjoy what you're doing at least somewhat.

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    (Original post by Kashmir Skirt)
    Some guy posted the top 10 starting salaries, Oxford Mathematics was top.


    The last bit I accept drags the average down, nobody goes into teaching or academia for the money
    These averages mean squat. There isn't a payscale for 'Oxford Mathmo'.

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Lol @ this thread

    OP, your earnings depend on what job you land. Studying economics doesn't actually translate into anything job-wise, it's a general academic degree. If you want lots of money, you better be at a target/semi-target uni and have a solid CV + good personality to stand a chance at the jobs that pay £50k base starting (front office IB).. Even top strategy consulting firms only come in at the £38-45k base range starting and they're arguably more elitist than FO IB.

    If this is a Q about eventually making that figure, then joining a Big4 firm in Audit (starting c.£28-29k) and leaving to an industry role in London after your 3 years training/ACA qualification could yield £50k. Or alternatively normal management consulting at a Big4/Accenture etc. EDIT: corporate law can also yield this level of income, but you'll need to be a strong enough candidate to land a training contract. Downside is you'll be studying for another 1.5 to 2 years for GDL and LPC.

    Progression in other fields is nowhere near as favourable or steep as the above routes but you have to remember it's not always about the money. You have to enjoy what you're doing at least somewhat.

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    Sorry, but I believe you are one of those cocky ignorant people. I know loads of people who have good jobs at high wage rates who went to rubbish universities. For example a family friend is now a solicitor who actually went to Westminster university and getting £90,000 a year.


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    (Original post by cutelady)
    Sorry, but I believe you are one of those cocky ignorant people. I know loads of people who have good jobs at high wage rates who went to rubbish universities. For example a family friend is now a solicitor who actually went to Westminster university and getting £90,000 a year.


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    Never said it was impossible.. I've met several Westminster, Greenwich etc grads at a top magic circle firm and they're certainly earning in that vicinity but by no means are these people the average, they are exceptions. They were the people with 1sts, high profile leadership positions in uni (societies, students union etc) at their respective universities. But thanks for the input I guess.

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    (Original post by cutelady)
    I know loads of people who have good jobs at high wage rates who went to rubbish universities. For example a family friend is now a solicitor who actually went to Westminster university and getting £90,000 a year.
    In which case you know the answer to your question already. It's mostly about the individual, not the uni they went to.
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    (Original post by Kashmir Skirt)
    Some guy posted the top 10 starting salaries, Oxford Mathematics was top.
    Depends on the survey

    http://www.thesundaytimes.co.uk/sto/...70d84649e01132

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    Weird because there is no "business studies" at Oxford like the source says there is.
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    Put the concept of specific degree from specific university equals X amount of money out of your head. It doesn't work like that. You first need to get your degree, then be able to show to relevant interests and experience within the field you are applying in addition to actually getting through what usually is a highly convoluted application process. If you set out to expect 25k when you graduate it will be a lot easier for yourself, as opposed to setting a highly unrealistic target, only achieved from highly lucrative, extremely competitive positions. Remember that even if you start at 25k, that doesnt mean your salary couldnt rapidly increase within the first couple of years.

    Good job and good salary = Degree X from uni Y + hard skills + soft skills + experience + interests + determination + luck

    not

    Good job and good salary = Degree X from uni Y
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    (Original post by ahpadt)
    Put the concept of specific degree from specific university equals X amount of money out of your head. It doesn't work like that. You first need to get your degree, then be able to show to relevant interests and experience within the field you are applying in addition to actually getting through what usually is a highly convoluted application process. If you set out to expect 25k when you graduate it will be a lot easier for yourself, as opposed to setting a highly unrealistic target, only achieved from highly lucrative, extremely competitive positions. Remember that even if you start at 25k, that doesnt mean your salary couldnt rapidly increase within the first couple of years.

    Good job and good salary = Degree X from uni Y + hard skills + soft skills + experience + interests + determination + luck

    not

    Good job and good salary = Degree X from uni Y
    This ^^^^^

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    (Original post by cutelady)
    I'm not going to a uni where it's high on the league tables but it's in the top 30, would this even allow me to have a job earning at least 50k or more a year if have a lot of experience and a first at university? It would I be stuck with 20k a year because my university isn't prestigious enough or in the top 10.
    Can anyone help?
    Thank you


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    I would say your experience becomes key in achieving 50k quickly.
    Also, if you can get experience in a slightly niche, but useful field, it will be a plus. In that way you might go around the ordinary graduate schemes (or perhaps in a leadership one) and accelerate quickly.
    One of my friends (BA Econ and business) had an internship, where she worked with energy and she had starting salary of 38k, I believe, as they had an opening which was related to the experience she instead of just some general skills.
    But yes, Economics can definitely get you to 50k.
    I might be slightly biased (studying economics and mathematics), but I would argue it's a degree that's very good joint with business, maths, computer science or marketing.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Studying economics doesn't actually translate into anything job-wise, it's a general academic degree.

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    Everything you talk about I'm sure is right but just to mention that this isn't necessarily true. You can work as an economist out of academia. Both public and private sector.
 
 
 
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