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    I really want to do Law at Cambridge and I was wondering if you guys could give me some advice.
    ATM I'm doing 4 A-Levels: Spanish, English Literature, Psychology and Geography.
    If you could give me any advice about personal statements, revision, or literally ANYTHING to help it would be greatly appreciated.
    Thank you
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    (Original post by studentjjs)
    I really want to do Law at Cambridge and I was wondering if you guys could give me some advice.
    ATM I'm doing 4 A-Levels: Spanish, English Literature, Psychology and Geography.
    If you could give me any advice about personal statements, revision, or literally ANYTHING to help it would be greatly appreciated.
    Thank you
    You would have more luck in getting a response if your question was a little more targeted than 'give me any advice about... literally anything'.

    Advice for personal statement: Do not waste time talking about how your A level subjects make you an ideal lawyer. No-one cares about that. Find an area of law that interests you and talk about that instead.

    Advice for revision: Keep doing it until you know you can get A*s.

    If you need to know anything specific, about the interviews, course, whatever else, I'll happily field it if I'm able.
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    (Original post by TimmonaPortella)
    You would have more luck in getting a response if your question was a little more targeted than 'give me any advice about... literally anything'.

    Advice for personal statement: Do not waste time talking about how your A level subjects make you an ideal lawyer. No-one cares about that. Find an area of law that interests you and talk about that instead.

    Advice for revision: Keep doing it until you know you can get A*s.

    If you need to know anything specific, about the interviews, course, whatever else, I'll happily field it if I'm able.

    1. Hello! My dream would be to study Law at Cambridge... Just wanted to thank you for reaching out because many of us really appreciate some insider advice.

      I have a few questions:

      1) How did you choose your college in Cambridge?

      2) What was your rationale when choosing your 5 unis?

      3) Which 5 unis did you choose to apply to?

      4) What 'super curricular activities' did you do at Alevel (activities outside the classroom relating to Law)

      5) How did you prepare for the Cambridge Law Test

      6) How many interviews did you have and how did you prepare for those interviews at Cambridge?

      7) Did you have any work experience before applying? If so, how many?

      8) Did you do an EPQ? If so, did you find it helpful?
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    (Original post by shreyhey)
    1. Hello! My dream would be to study Law at Cambridge... Just wanted to thank you for reaching out because many of us really appreciate some insider advice.

      I have a few questions:

      1) How did you choose your college in Cambridge?

      2) What was your rationale when choosing your 5 unis?

      3) Which 5 unis did you choose to apply to?

      4) What 'super curricular activities' did you do at Alevel (activities outside the classroom relating to Law)

      5) How did you prepare for the Cambridge Law Test

      6) How many interviews did you have and how did you prepare for those interviews at Cambridge?

      7) Did you have any work experience before applying? If so, how many?

      8) Did you do an EPQ? If so, did you find it helpful?
    I'm not a lawyer but I am a Cantab so can answer the more general ones of these if that'll help

    1) I went on an open day but tbh I didn't find it very helpful because I liked all the colleges I visited. So I chose a part of town I liked the most and then in the end I flipped a coin between my top two favourites.

    2) Again, I was absolutely dreadful at making this decision. I just looked at the leaderboards for my subject (English), applied to some of the top ones and then also applied to the uni my parents went to, to keep them happy. My reasoning for not doing more research was that if I didn't get into any of Cambridge, UCL, or Durham then I'd take a gap year and try again, so my other two choices were arbitrary anyway since I was never going to accept them.

    3) Cambridge, UCL, Durham, Warwick, and Birmingham

    4) I founded and contributed a lot to some subject-specific societies, but the vast bulk of my preparation was reading at (what I understood to be) degree-level. I also got in touch with some Cantabs and got them to send me some of their essays so I could read them and identify where the big jumps from A-Level to Cambridge were so I could focus on trying to make those jumps myself while still at school. I also did more generic stuff to improve my cognitive skills (I already had an AS in Critical Thinking which was surprisingly helpful, but I started taking a weirdly keen interest in memory techniques, rhetoric, and thinking skills, as well as getting more involved in debating - which, again, I'd already been doing for years). Being able to think clearly and well under pressure before articulating yourself lucidly is one of the key things they're testing for at interview, so imo it's very important that you're able to do that.

    5) -

    6) I had two at Cambridge, but I'd already done one at UCL a few weeks prior. The UCL interview was extremely useful vis a vis settling the nerves; I basically treated it as a trial run and then when Cambridge came around I felt much more relaxed and the interviews honestly didn't faze me at all. For preparation, I made sure my reading was broad and deep and that it shadowed Part I of the Cambridge course as far as possible. I also did several practice interviews with teachers at my school, which were quite useful. I did one or two with non-English teachers too - my thinking was that their lack of specific subject knowledge would mean they'd pull me up if I wasn't explaining things clearly. I made sure I was ready to talk about my personal statement, but as it happened it didn't come up much in the interviews beyond lead-in questions. I also had a test at Cambridge on my interview day, which I'd prepared for by just doing loads of similar practice tests (it wasn't a standardised test like you'll have to do as a lawyer, so again not especially applicable).

    7) I didn't, but there was no need for me to. I think relevant work experience could benefit a lawyer's application, though.

    8) I did, and no it wasn't helpful at all. Looking back, I wish I'd done what most Oxbridge applicants at my school did and continued with the EPQ until they had their offers/rejections, and then dropped it. I think it looks good to have it on your UCAS when you apply, but in my personal opinion it's not worth completing. It taught me zero useful study skills and was just a major time sink during summer. I think it's a pretty useless qualification tbh
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    (Original post by shreyhey)
    1. Hello! My dream would be to study Law at Cambridge... Just wanted to thank you for reaching out because many of us really appreciate some insider advice.

      I have a few questions:

      1) How did you choose your college in Cambridge?

      2) What was your rationale when choosing your 5 unis?

      3) Which 5 unis did you choose to apply to?

      4) What 'super curricular activities' did you do at Alevel (activities outside the classroom relating to Law)

      5) How did you prepare for the Cambridge Law Test

      6) How many interviews did you have and how did you prepare for those interviews at Cambridge?

      7) Did you have any work experience before applying? If so, how many?

      8) Did you do an EPQ? If so, did you find it helpful?
    Hi, this is an old thread.
    Maybe also try asking in this thread:
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=5191156
    I am a first year Law Student at Cambridge (Q&A)



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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    Hi, this is an old thread.
    Maybe also try asking in this thread:
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=5191156
    I am a first year Law Student at Cambridge (Q&A)



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    (Original post by Parliament)
    I'm not a lawyer but I am a Cantab so can answer the more general ones of these if that'll help

    1) I went on an open day but tbh I didn't find it very helpful because I liked all the colleges I visited. So I chose a part of town I liked the most and then in the end I flipped a coin between my top two favourites.

    2) Again, I was absolutely dreadful at making this decision. I just looked at the leaderboards for my subject (English), applied to some of the top ones and then also applied to the uni my parents went to, to keep them happy. My reasoning for not doing more research was that if I didn't get into any of Cambridge, UCL, or Durham then I'd take a gap year and try again, so my other two choices were arbitrary anyway since I was never going to accept them.

    3) Cambridge, UCL, Durham, Warwick, and Birmingham

    4) I founded and contributed a lot to some subject-specific societies, but the vast bulk of my preparation was reading at (what I understood to be) degree-level. I also got in touch with some Cantabs and got them to send me some of their essays so I could read them and identify where the big jumps from A-Level to Cambridge were so I could focus on trying to make those jumps myself while still at school. I also did more generic stuff to improve my cognitive skills (I already had an AS in Critical Thinking which was surprisingly helpful, but I started taking a weirdly keen interest in memory techniques, rhetoric, and thinking skills, as well as getting more involved in debating - which, again, I'd already been doing for years). Being able to think clearly and well under pressure before articulating yourself lucidly is one of the key things they're testing for at interview, so imo it's very important that you're able to do that.

    5) -

    6) I had two at Cambridge, but I'd already done one at UCL a few weeks prior. The UCL interview was extremely useful vis a vis settling the nerves; I basically treated it as a trial run and then when Cambridge came around I felt much more relaxed and the interviews honestly didn't faze me at all. For preparation, I made sure my reading was broad and deep and that it shadowed Part I of the Cambridge course as far as possible. I also did several practice interviews with teachers at my school, which were quite useful. I did one or two with non-English teachers too - my thinking was that their lack of specific subject knowledge would mean they'd pull me up if I wasn't explaining things clearly. I made sure I was ready to talk about my personal statement, but as it happened it didn't come up much in the interviews beyond lead-in questions. I also had a test at Cambridge on my interview day, which I'd prepared for by just doing loads of similar practice tests (it wasn't a standardised test like you'll have to do as a lawyer, so again not especially applicable).

    7) I didn't, but there was no need for me to. I think relevant work experience could benefit a lawyer's application, though.

    8) I did, and no it wasn't helpful at all. Looking back, I wish I'd done what most Oxbridge applicants at my school did and continued with the EPQ until they had their offers/rejections, and then dropped it. I think it looks good to have it on your UCAS when you apply, but in my personal opinion it's not worth completing. It taught me zero useful study skills and was just a major time sink during summer. I think it's a pretty useless qualification tbh

    Thank you so so so much for your advice! i see, so the EPQ is too time-consuming... Have you heard if colleges in Cambridge put the EPQ as part of the offer? for Law?


    Would you happen to have any friends who did Law at Cambridge?
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    (Original post by shreyhey)
    1. Hello! My dream would be to study Law at Cambridge... Just wanted to thank you for reaching out because many of us really appreciate some insider advice.

      I have a few questions:

      1) How did you choose your college in Cambridge?

      2) What was your rationale when choosing your 5 unis?

      3) Which 5 unis did you choose to apply to?

      4) What 'super curricular activities' did you do at Alevel (activities outside the classroom relating to Law)

      5) How did you prepare for the Cambridge Law Test

      6) How many interviews did you have and how did you prepare for those interviews at Cambridge?

      7) Did you have any work experience before applying? If so, how many?

      8) Did you do an EPQ? If so, did you find it helpful?
    (1) I looked at the websites, my college was about the size I wanted and conveniently located. Do not overthink this. It matters in some ways, basic things like how important it is to you to be close to your fac, do you want to be in a big year group or a smaller one, etc, but ultimately pretty much everyone ends up being happy where they are. You'll develop friendship groups and they will become what you associate with the college, really.

    (2) I picked the ones I thought were prestigious and applied without visiting. It's not a path I advice following, although it happened to work out okay for me.

    (3) I applied to Cambridge, LSE, and UCL, and didn't use the other spots.

    (4) I did a week of work experience in a local law firm but it's so unimportant that I didn't even mention it in my PS. You're not expected to have practical experience at this stage. Even if you did, it's unlikely to be particularly relevant to what you'll do as part of the degree (unless you happen to have had chance to shadow a barrister in an appeal and you've been dissecting judgments). You're applying for an academic degree. Concentrate on that aspect. Read some books and such like.

    (5) You can't do all that much, to be honest. I did the essay version, and it's very much a test of (a) how well you can think of arguments on the spot, with the topics being things you won't necessarily have given much thought before, and (b) how effectively you can present those arguments. The upside to this is that you don't need to worry about it too much. You can pretty much just show up and give it your best shot. Although perhaps things have changed since I took the CLT, I don't know.

    If you really want to you can try analysing some articles/opinion pieces/whatever, how they make arguments etc, but my own view is really that, by the time you're entering sixth form, you've more or less either developed the skills or not.

    (6) I had one or two mock interviews and I made sure I knew the texts I'd mentioned in my PS very well, although they didn't in fact really ask me about them. I made sure I was up to date with current affairs, although I was doing that of my own accord anyway, and indeed a slot in one of my interviews was dedicated to a discussion of one of the stories of the day. Really though, as with the CLT, I think a lot of what they're looking for is how well you can analyse new materials and make arguments on new topics in fairly short order. Far more important than what you know going into the interview is how you think.

    (7) As above.

    (8) Yes, I did, and, no, it was an entire waste of time.
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    (Original post by TimmonaPortella)
    (1) I looked at the websites, my college was about the size I wanted and conveniently located. Do not overthink this. It matters in some ways, basic things like how important it is to you to be close to your fac, do you want to be in a big year group or a smaller one, etc, but ultimately pretty much everyone ends up being happy where they are. You'll develop friendship groups and they will become what you associate with the college, really.

    (2) I picked the ones I thought were prestigious and applied without visiting. It's not a path I advice following, although it happened to work out okay for me.

    (3) I applied to Cambridge, LSE, and UCL, and didn't use the other spots.

    (4) I did a week of work experience in a local law firm but it's so unimportant that I didn't even mention it in my PS. You're not expected to have practical experience at this stage. Even if you did, it's unlikely to be particularly relevant to what you'll do as part of the degree (unless you happen to have had chance to shadow a barrister in an appeal and you've been dissecting judgments). You're applying for an academic degree. Concentrate on that aspect. Read some books and such like.

    (5) You can't do all that much, to be honest. I did the essay version, and it's very much a test of (a) how well you can think of arguments on the spot, with the topics being things you won't necessarily have given much thought before, and (b) how effectively you can present those arguments. The upside to this is that you don't need to worry about it too much. You can pretty much just show up and give it your best shot. Although perhaps things have changed since I took the CLT, I don't know.

    If you really want to you can try analysing some articles/opinion pieces/whatever, how they make arguments etc, but my own view is really that, by the time you're entering sixth form, you've more or less either developed the skills or not.

    (6) I had one or two mock interviews and I made sure I knew the texts I'd mentioned in my PS very well, although they didn't in fact really ask me about them. I made sure I was up to date with current affairs, although I was doing that of my own accord anyway, and indeed a slot in one of my interviews was dedicated to a discussion of one of the stories of the day. Really though, as with the CLT, I think a lot of what they're looking for is how well you can analyse new materials and make arguments on new topics in fairly short order. Far more important than what you know going into the interview is how you think.

    (7) As above.

    (8) Yes, I did, and, no, it was an entire waste of time.

    Thank you so much! This is great advice! I really appreciate it

    Have you heard of instances where the conditional offer includes the EPQ? And do you think the EPQ remotely helped at all in interview perhaps?


    Kind regards,
    Shreya
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    (Original post by shreyhey)
    Thank you so much! This is great advice! I really appreciate it

    Have you heard of instances where the conditional offer includes the EPQ? And do you think the EPQ remotely helped at all in interview perhaps?


    Kind regards,
    Shreya
    You're welcome

    I think it came up very briefly in one of my interviews but only because I talked about that topic in my PS, and, if it hadn't come up, they'd have just found something else to ask me about.

    I really don't think it's worth the time investment. If you are interested in a subject, you can read about it without all the fuss involved in the EPQ. It will be just as good for PS material.

    I don't recall ever hearing of it being made part of a conditional offer, no. I know that I was some way through it when I got to interview, and I didn't pay that much attention to it after that. A friend of mine who also got an offer just didn't bother finishing his. No-one seemed to mind.
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    (Original post by shreyhey)
    Thank you so so so much for your advice! i see, so the EPQ is too time-consuming... Have you heard if colleges in Cambridge put the EPQ as part of the offer? for Law?
    None.

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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    None.

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    Thank you!
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    (Original post by TimmonaPortella)
    You're welcome

    I think it came up very briefly in one of my interviews but only because I talked about that topic in my PS, and, if it hadn't come up, they'd have just found something else to ask me about.

    I really don't think it's worth the time investment. If you are interested in a subject, you can read about it without all the fuss involved in the EPQ. It will be just as good for PS material.

    I don't recall ever hearing of it being made part of a conditional offer, no. I know that I was some way through it when I got to interview, and I didn't pay that much attention to it after that. A friend of mine who also got an offer just didn't bother finishing his. No-one seemed to mind.
    Thank you!!
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    (Original post by shreyhey)
    Thank you so so so much for your advice! i see, so the EPQ is too time-consuming... Have you heard if colleges in Cambridge put the EPQ as part of the offer? for Law?


    Would you happen to have any friends who did Law at Cambridge?
    I've never heard anyone have an EPQ included as part of their offer, I'd advise just carrying on with it until you hear back from your unis and then dropping it.

    Yeah I do, but they're all international students so perhaps not particularly useful to you :/
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    (Original post by TimmonaPortella)
    A friend of mine who also got an offer just didn't bother finishing his. No-one seemed to mind.
    (Original post by Parliament)
    I've never heard anyone have an EPQ included as part of their offer, I'd advise just carrying on with it until you hear back from your unis and then dropping it.
    (Original post by shreyhey)
    Thank you!!
    Just to be clear, it's not a good idea to change any aspect of your application without checking with your universities. It can invalidate your application and universities are entitled to withdraw any offers. i.e. you can't just drop a subject/EPQ even if it's not formally part of your offer conditions. You need to speak to the universities (or college) involved first, and in most (but by no means all) cases they will say it's fine to drop it.

    tl;dr. Ask first before dropping an EPQ.
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    (Original post by Parliament)
    I've never heard anyone have an EPQ included as part of their offer, I'd advise just carrying on with it until you hear back from your unis and then dropping it.

    Yeah I do, but they're all international students so perhaps not particularly useful to you :/

    Hi! I will be applying as an International student actually!
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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    Just to be clear, it's not a good idea to change any aspect of your application without checking with your universities. It can invalidate your application and universities are entitled to withdraw any offers. i.e. you can't just drop a subject/EPQ even if it's not formally part of your offer conditions. You need to speak to the universities (or college) involved first, and in most (but by no means all) cases they will say it's fine to drop it.

    tl;dr. Ask first before dropping an EPQ.
    I see, alright, I will take that into consideration, thanks!
 
 
 

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