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    Hey guys!
    So basically I've been really confused and I have no one to help me with it .

    Basically u was stuck on this topic on thermoregulation which is part of homeostasis. I study A2 biology and exam board is AQA

    I want to know if this is right and can SOMEONE PLEASE PHRASE THIS PROPERLY! I don't know how to 😭😭😭;
    Increasing temperature- leads to decrease in the need of food uptake- this is because there is increase in enzyme activity and hence there is a higher rate of/ more ( I don't which one is right ? Is it both of them) respiration. This means that there is faster metabolism of more food and so there is more heat released.

    My problem is - what does metabolism mean in simple English ? I know metabolic rate is the speed at which chemical reactions like respiration occur .

    My other question is metabolic rate the same as the rate of reaction ?
    Also the main question is how exactly does eating food generate heat ? Including all the steps I'm mentioned ?
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    (Original post by neuroash)
    Hey guys!
    So basically I've been really confused and I have no one to help me with it .

    Basically u was stuck on this topic on thermoregulation which is part of homeostasis. I study A2 biology and exam board is AQA

    I want to know if this is right and can SOMEONE PLEASE PHRASE THIS PROPERLY! I don't know how to 😭😭😭;
    Increasing temperature- leads to decrease in the need of food uptake- this is because there is increase in enzyme activity and hence there is a higher rate of/ more ( I don't which one is right ? Is it both of them) respiration. This means that there is faster metabolism of more food and so there is more heat released.

    My problem is - what does metabolism mean in simple English ? I know metabolic rate is the speed at which chemical reactions like respiration occur .

    My other question is metabolic rate the same as the rate of reaction ?
    Also the main question is how exactly does eating food generate heat ? Including all the steps I'm mentioned ?
    Metabolism is quite hard to define but basically it's the chemical reactions going on in the body that are required for the body to stay alive, so therefore, including respiration.

    Metabolic rate (often called basal metabolic rate, while at rest) is the rate at which these reactions are occurring so yes, its very similar to rate of reaction but its talking about multiple reactions at a time, (many reactions are involved in respiration)

    Eating and digesting food generates heat in two ways:
    Firstly, for food to move through the gut peristalsis must occur which involves contraction of smooth muscle. Contraction of muscle uses ATP (is an active process) and will therefore also produce heat. (think of exercise/physical activity producing heat, its the same principle)
    Secondly, the digestion of food and subsequent respiration using these products require multiple reactions. Some reactions will be exothermic (release heat) and some will be endothermic (require heat), this just depends on the energy level of the reactants and products (energy level depends of the strength of the bonds in each molecule and each type of bond has a different energy level).
    I don't want to complicate it too much and I'm trying to think about what I knew at A level but if you would like more detail just let me know (I'm now an undergrad)

    Thinking about the rephrasing part, I'm not sure what question you are trying to answer but I would say it more like this:
    An increase in temperature leads to an increase in enzyme activity and hence, a higher rate of respiration. This means that there is a higher metabolic rate and so more heat energy is released. This in turn, leads to a decreased food uptake.


    I hope that helps slightly
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    (Original post by Tenrec)
    Thinking about the rephrasing part, I'm not sure what question you are trying to answer but I would say it more like this:
    An increase in temperature leads to an increase in enzyme activity and hence, a higher rate of respiration. This means that there is a higher metabolic rate and so more heat energy is released. This in turn, leads to a decreased food uptake.
    You guys think that burning more energy leads to less oral intake?
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    (Original post by nexttime)
    You guys think that burning more energy leads to less oral intake?
    I wasn't really sure about that, I know more about animal physiology (I'm studying veterinary) and the basic idea there is that in summer higher temperatures mean that there is more food available so animals use more energy to find food and the greater food intake leads to a catabolic state. In the winter cooler temperatures mean there is less food available so animals spend less time foraging, and consequently less energy is spent on looking for food (relatively speaking) so there is a lower food intake and the body uses up reserves gained in the summer months and is in an anabolic state.
    Thinking about that made me confused about the thermoregulation side of things but physiologically it makes sense to reduce heat producing activities if the body is in danger of becoming hyperthermic but I'm not sure how much of an effect it would have on a day to day basis when hyperthermia is not a risk.
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    (Original post by Tenrec)
    I wasn't really sure about that, I know more about animal physiology (I'm studying veterinary) and the basic idea there is that in summer higher temperatures mean that there is more food available so animals use more energy to find food and the greater food intake leads to a catabolic state. In the winter cooler temperatures mean there is less food available so animals spend less time foraging, and consequently less energy is spent on looking for food (relatively speaking) so there is a lower food intake and the body uses up reserves gained in the summer months and is in an anabolic state.
    Thinking about that made me confused about the thermoregulation side of things but physiologically it makes sense to reduce heat producing activities if the body is in danger of becoming hyperthermic but I'm not sure how much of an effect it would have on a day to day basis when hyperthermia is not a risk.
    I don't think you understand what anabolism and catabolism are! How can an animal be anabolic, i.e. gaining fat and muscle, when there is little or even no food?

    Cold increases metabolism in attempts to stay warm - shivering etc. Heat has little effect in human adults but in babies with brown fat and potentially other species you'd expect it to reduce basal metabolism.

    The rate of reaction stuff the other poster is talking about is irrelevant in warm blooded species as core temperature is tightly regulated. Rate of reaction does not speed up when its warmer because the animal never gets warmer.
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    (Original post by nexttime)
    I don't think you understand what anabolism and catabolism are! How can an animal be anabolic, i.e. gaining fat and muscle, when there is little or even no food?
    .
    Yes, sorry I got anabolic and catabolic the wrong way round

    (Original post by nexttime)
    Cold increases metabolism in attempts to stay warm - shivering etc. Heat has little effect in human adults but in babies with brown fat and potentially other species you'd expect it to reduce basal metabolism.
    .
    Yes, but if the question is trying to link food intake with thermoregulation then I was trying to provide so ideas as the food seeking behavior of carnivores and herbivores is different, which is why I asked what the initial question was. I think your answer is probably best in the basic sense though
 
 
 
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