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    Hi, I am currently applying to the BA English Language and Literature course that the OU offer, and am planning on finishing it in 3 years as you would with a regular degree. I will hopefully be doing voluntary work 2 or 3 days a week whilst carrying out my studies- I was wondering if anyone has any insight on what its like to study a degree with the OU over a period of three years? Is it manageable? And if you have done so how did you find the experience to be?

    Any personal experiences on the English Lang & Lit course would also be very helpful

    Thank you!
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    I think 4 years is more realistic. Everyone I spoke to in the OU facebook groups agreed that doing two level 3 modules in a year is asking for trouble.
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    I studied with the OU full time in the past.

    I personally felt that studying full time was intense.

    However, if you feel that you are capable of studying full time then you should go for it.
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    (Original post by Km_dova)
    I was wondering if anyone has any insight on what its like to study a degree with the OU over a period of three years? Is it manageable? And if you have done so how did you find the experience to be?

    Any personal experiences on the English Lang & Lit course would also be very helpful
    I am coming to the last 5 weeks of my first year of the English Language and Literature BA. I'm studying both AA100 and A105 simultaneously, alongside working full time in an autism spectrum disorder centre and a secondary school (40 hours a week in total).

    I found the start of the year rather manageable, and had enough energy to work, study and have a small social life. As the year has progressed, the TMAs have started asking for higher word counts and more detailed analysis and referencing. You can get by with simply reading the course books (4 per module) and set books, but next year the requirement will be to carry out more 'further reading' as well as provide more expansive arguments (higher word counts and deeper analysis) - especially if aiming for 2:1 and above.

    It will all depend on how focussed you are and how much time you are willing to dedicate to reading, preparing information, and actually working on your assignments. It's definitely do-able, but if you want to get the most out of the content and still have a more rounded lifestyle, I wouldn't recommend full time work with full time study. Working part time as you intend to, may be a much more comfortable option.

    The modules so far, AA100 and A105, are arts foundation modules and contain a variety of options in literature, history, art history, religious studies and classical music. I have enjoyed A105's chapters on language analysis and AA100s chapters on short stories, particularly. I read and listened to Dr Faustus and the Faber Book of Beasts earlier in the year, and they were both interesting!

    Thanks for reading.
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    Thank you for your responce! So how would doing it in 4 years work? Would I do 2 modules in year 1, 2 more in year 2 and then one in year 3 and one in year 4?
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    (Original post by User2016)
    I studied with the OU full time in the past.

    I personally felt that studying full time was intense.

    However, if you feel that you are capable of studying full time then you should go for it.
    Thank you, did you complete your course in full time or switch to part time? And did you have any work commitments whilst you were studying full time?
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    (Original post by Андрей)
    I am coming to the last 5 weeks of my first year of the English Language and Literature BA. I'm studying both AA100 and A105 simultaneously, alongside working full time in an autism spectrum disorder centre and a secondary school (40 hours a week in total).

    I found the start of the year rather manageable, and had enough energy to work, study and have a small social life. As the year has progressed, the TMAs have started asking for higher word counts and more detailed analysis and referencing. You can get by with simply reading the course books (4 per module) and set books, but next year the requirement will be to carry out more 'further reading' as well as provide more expansive arguments (higher word counts and deeper analysis) - especially if aiming for 2:1 and above.

    It will all depend on how focussed you are and how much time you are willing to dedicate to reading, preparing information, and actually working on your assignments. It's definitely do-able, but if you want to get the most out of the content and still have a more rounded lifestyle, I wouldn't recommend full time work with full time study. Working part time as you intend to, may be a much more comfortable option.

    The modules so far, AA100 and A105, are arts foundation modules and contain a variety of options in literature, history, art history, religious studies and classical music. I have enjoyed A105's chapters on language analysis and AA100s chapters on short stories, particularly. I read and listened to Dr Faustus and the Faber Book of Beasts earlier in the year, and they were both interesting!

    Thanks for reading.
    Thank you so much for the input, this has helped me massively 😊 After this year do you think you'll stick to full time study? I think I will see how full time study suits me in year 1 and then make a decision on how I want to study the modules in year 2- but I must say you've done an incredibly good job balancing full time study with work 40 hours a week! I definitely don't see myself pulling something like that off haha!
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    (Original post by Km_dova)
    Thank you for your responce! So how would doing it in 4 years work? Would I do 2 modules in year 1, 2 more in year 2 and then one in year 3 and one in year 4?
    I guess so. Some people I know prefer to do one level 2 and one level 3 module together at the same time.
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    (Original post by Km_dova)
    Thank you so much for the input, this has helped me massively 😊 After this year do you think you'll stick to full time study? I think I will see how full time study suits me in year 1 and then make a decision on how I want to study the modules in year 2- but I must say you've done an incredibly good job balancing full time study with work 40 hours a week! I definitely don't see myself pulling something like that off haha!
    Thanks, it does feel like I've taken on too much sometimes! Will I change next year? Well I am quite impatient and the thought of getting it all finished in two years (from now) is rather tempting, so I'll continue to be a full-timer. I am currently planning areas of my life where I can 'create' a few extra hours a week, which will aid in keeping things buoyant - mostly I'll cut back on weekday sports to just once a week. If you can be flexible and committed to changing things to fit around your degree, then it is not so bad.

    I think you've made a very sensible plan and I wish you all the best. If there is anything further, just ask and I will do my best to help.
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    (Original post by Snufkin)
    I guess so. Some people I know prefer to do one level 2 and one level 3 module together at the same time.
    Oh okay! That makes sense, thanks a lot 😊
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    (Original post by Андрей)
    Thanks, it does feel like I've taken on too much sometimes! Will I change next year? Well I am quite impatient and the thought of getting it all finished in two years (from now) is rather tempting, so I'll continue to be a full-timer. I am currently planning areas of my life where I can 'create' a few extra hours a week, which will aid in keeping things buoyant - mostly I'll cut back on weekday sports to just once a week. If you can be flexible and committed to changing things to fit around your degree, then it is not so bad.

    I think you've made a very sensible plan and I wish you all the best. If there is anything further, just ask and I will do my best to help.
    Thank you! How many hours do you find yourself putting into each module every week? And how difficult have you found the course to be this year?
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    (Original post by Km_dova)
    Thank you! How many hours do you find yourself putting into each module every week? And how difficult have you found the course to be this year?
    Most evenings I'd spend approximately 2 hours for each module reading and making-notes/highlighting and adding any points of relevance to an assignment plan. I tend to alternate AA100 one night and A105 the next, but on assignment week it merges. I try and get 4 hours in on Sunday evening, getting any set book reading done that I need to. I usually have Friday and Saturday free.

    The concepts and ideas have been straightforward enough. The assignment questions are always directly related to the main theme of the OU course books. The tutorials have been enjoyable and people on the course tend to be supportive.

    There has just been an assignment for A105 which involved working in a group to produce a wiki essay. There were 6 people in my group and we had to communicate on an OU forum; our tutor was in the background observing and occasionally prompting, but essentially we had to work co-operatively to decide on our sources and then write, reference, edit and upload the essay - not so straightforward if people are online at different times and nervous about comparing their ideas with strangers. All the people in my group were familiar from tutorials, so that helped a lot! Others seemingly weren't so lucky.

    The Facebook A105 support group had literally dozens of people complaining about the task - how it was unfair because people in their group didn't contribute - how it was awkward to have to share ideas with others, etc... There are two group tasks like that in A105, but other than that, it is all independent work.

    AA100's assignments have been completely independent, and despite being based more broadly on the arts, I feel it is the module I have learnt the most from.

    All in all, there is no focus on literature or language, so in that sense it can be difficult if you have your heart set on jumping straight into an 'English degree' - I will be glad to start the proper literature and language modules next year, but I have actually enjoyed the varied mix of the two arts foundation modules.
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    (Original post by Андрей)
    Most evenings I'd spend approximately 2 hours for each module reading and making-notes/highlighting and adding any points of relevance to an assignment plan. I tend to alternate AA100 one night and A105 the next, but on assignment week it merges. I try and get 4 hours in on Sunday evening, getting any set book reading done that I need to. I usually have Friday and Saturday free.

    All in all, there is no focus on literature or language, so in that sense it can be difficult if you have your heart set on jumping straight into an 'English degree' - I will be glad to start the proper literature and language modules next year, but I have actually enjoyed the varied mix of the two arts foundation modules.
    That's been extremely helpful, thank you! I've just been a little confused with the Student loans- Even though I will be
    studying full time I have to apply for the part time loan don't I? And are there any funds the uni provide for buying course books or towards a laptop etc? Its not very clear on the website... Thank you x
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    (Original post by Km_dova)
    That's been extremely helpful, thank you! I've just been a little confused with the Student loans- Even though I will be
    studying full time I have to apply for the part time loan don't I? And are there any funds the uni provide for buying course books or towards a laptop etc? Its not very clear on the website... Thank you x
    OU module books and dvds are included in the course fee, but set books have to be purchased by the student.

    In terms of financial support, I'm afraid I don't know about student finance, since I have used my savings and salary to fund the course. There may be extra support if you have a learning difficulty, but I couldn't say for sure.

    Here is the number for new students:0300 303 5303 - you will get through to an OU adviser who should be able to answer any questions you have. From my experience they are very helpful and friendly.
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    (Original post by Андрей)
    OU module books and dvds are included in the course fee, but set books have to be purchased by the student.

    In terms of financial support, I'm afraid I don't know about student finance, since I have used my savings and salary to fund the course. There may be extra support if you have a learning difficulty, but I couldn't say for sure.

    Here is the number for new students:0300 303 5303 - you will get through to an OU adviser who should be able to answer any questions you have. From my experience they are very helpful and friendly.
    Ah thank you for all your help
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    Hi everyone,

    This is for the people who are taking A105 now (or have taken it in the past).

    I'm doing AA100 right now but I think really don't want to take A105 in October. The group work and the preparation tasks for TMAs (I read that point somewhere, I think on the OU page itself) sound rather awful.
    Also, I always wanted to learn Italian, so I'll probably take beginner's Italian and later intermediate Italian instead of A105.

    However, since I'm doing the Classical Studies BA, I believe not knowing about the things taught in A105 puts me at a disadvantage.

    For those who still have their books: could you post me a list of the contents of the books (lie, chapter titles and such) so I have an idea what will be discussed? Or if you'd be willing to give me the PDFs of the books, that would be even better of course.
    I might still change my mind and take it anyway, I haven't signed up for anything yet.

    Thanks a lot!
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    (Original post by SpaceNomad)
    Hi everyone,

    This is for the people who are taking A105 now (or have taken it in the past).

    I'm doing AA100 right now but I think really don't want to take A105 in October. The group work and the preparation tasks for TMAs (I read that point somewhere, I think on the OU page itself) sound rather awful.
    Also, I always wanted to learn Italian, so I'll probably take beginner's Italian and later intermediate Italian instead of A105.

    However, since I'm doing the Classical Studies BA, I believe not knowing about the things taught in A105 puts me at a disadvantage.

    For those who still have their books: could you post me a list of the contents of the books (lie, chapter titles and such) so I have an idea what will be discussed? Or if you'd be willing to give me the PDFs of the books, that would be even better of course.
    I might still change my mind and take it anyway, I haven't signed up for anything yet.

    Thanks a lot!
    I have the PDF books for A150 Voices and Texts (I did it before the A150 and A151 were merged into a single module), they might be helpful... although I don't remember anything in them which might be relevant to Classical Studies. PM me your email address and I can send you them.
 
 
 
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