How do you revise for history? Watch

Jamii
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Hi!
I'm starting my history revision and making notes from my textbooks and stuff which I'll then make flash cards from and do practice papers.
But I feel like just learning the facts isn't enough, like I'm a bit stuck on what I actually would need to revise, if that makes sense? Like should I know the causes and impacts of everything, even though it isn't really in the textbook?
Also, if anyone has any revision tips, that would be really useful!
Thank you so much! x
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Lemauricien
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Memorise.
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thehistorybore
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(Original post by Jamii)
Hi!
I'm starting my history revision and making notes from my textbooks and stuff which I'll then make flash cards from and do practice papers.
But I feel like just learning the facts isn't enough, like I'm a bit stuck on what I actually would need to revise, if that makes sense? Like should I know the causes and impacts of everything, even though it isn't really in the textbook?
Also, if anyone has any revision tips, that would be really useful!
Thank you so much! x
The game changes a bit at A-Level; obviously you need facts, but you also need to show awareness of the historical debate - rather than just telling a story. Having historical interpretation is what separates your As from your A*s. I used to pick topics, past questions (or write my own) and create tables that showed both sides of the historical argument. Just keeping re-doing them and then write essays from the tables, and eventually from memory! Worked a treat for me, as one of the questions that came up in my exam was very similar to one that I had written a couple of days before it :P
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erino'neill
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(Original post by Jamii)
Hi!
I'm starting my history revision and making notes from my textbooks and stuff which I'll then make flash cards from and do practice papers.
But I feel like just learning the facts isn't enough, like I'm a bit stuck on what I actually would need to revise, if that makes sense? Like should I know the causes and impacts of everything, even though it isn't really in the textbook?
Also, if anyone has any revision tips, that would be really useful!
Thank you so much! x
Jesus you've started revising already??? :dolphin::dolphin::dolphin::dolphin::dolphin::dolphin::dolphin:s I need to write my coursework in the holidays
I don't know what everyone else does but I focus on the factors that contribute to things because they'll likely ask a question like 'To what extent was (factor) responsible for (event)?' or 'To what extent was (factor) the most significant consequence of (event)?' (though they'll probably be phrased a bit dodgy to throw you off) so I learn all the contributing and resulting factors of things and own knowledge kinda just seeps in like dates and stuff.
Which exam board are you on? Do you have to do sources? Because you should defo practice with a few of them, bringing in historiography, cross referencing etc with, again, the factors leading or resulting from events.
Are you doing the Cold War? Because apart from those things there's not much you can do, you just gotta go with the flow bro
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Jamii
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(Original post by erino'neill)
Jesus you've started revising already??? :dolphin::dolphin::dolphin::dolphin::dolphin::dolphin::dolphin:s I need to write my coursework in the holidays
I don't know what everyone else does but I focus on the factors that contribute to things because they'll likely ask a question like 'To what extent was (factor) responsible for (event)?' or 'To what extent was (factor) the most significant consequence of (event)?' (though they'll probably be phrased a bit dodgy to throw you off) so I learn all the contributing and resulting factors of things and own knowledge kinda just seeps in like dates and stuff.
Which exam board are you on? Do you have to do sources? Because you should defo practice with a few of them, bringing in historiography, cross referencing etc with, again, the factors leading or resulting from events.
Are you doing the Cold War? Because apart from those things there's not much you can do, you just gotta go with the flow bro

Ah that's such a good idea, thank you! I'm doing the new Edexcel syllabus and yeah we have sources Do you do all the events, or just sort of significant ones mentioned in the syllabus, if that makes sense? Thanks for your help, and good luck with your coursework!
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Jamii
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(Original post by thehistorybore)
The game changes a bit at A-Level; obviously you need facts, but you also need to show awareness of the historical debate - rather than just telling a story. Having historical interpretation is what separates your As from your A*s. I used to pick topics, past questions (or write my own) and create tables that showed both sides of the historical argument. Just keeping re-doing them and then write essays from the tables, and eventually from memory! Worked a treat for me, as one of the questions that came up in my exam was very similar to one that I had written a couple of days before it :P
This is such a good idea, thank you! I love a good table... Which topics do you do tables on, is it like significant events or things mentioned in the syllabus? Thanks so much!
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Josb
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(Original post by Jamii)
Ah that's such a good idea, thank you! I'm doing the new Edexcel syllabus and yeah we have sources Do you do all the events, or just sort of significant ones mentioned in the syllabus, if that makes sense? Thanks for your help, and good luck with your coursework!
Draw timelines.
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Miss.Unknow
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Hey!
I'm revising for history AS exam and i did GCSE last year. This was my method.
1. Make a timetable for history, make sure you have plenty of time to fit all the topics in without having to rush them.
2. create a mind map, it might get a bit boring having to read and write down notes, so why not make a colourful mind map that you could use for quick revision when before the real exam.
3. If you do get bored with notes, how about you watch some videos,documentaries or a historical movie that could help you with your topic, there's plenty of videos on Youtube.
4. i like to draw the events i read about! not a big detailed drawing, just a small sketch (even stick man) that would help me memorise it! print pictures if it helps.
5. Read examiner reports! they give feedback on what some students lacked in the exam. very useful tips for the future.
6. Exam Q and sources, find as many sources online as you can get and make up Q in your head and practice how to answer them! Don't forget to do real exam papers!
Hope this helps, if you have any Q feel free to ask!
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AlmightyJesus
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look - cover - write - check
the golden formula for memorising anything
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MezmorisedPotato
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Understand the time periods really well and know what happened at what time. Make sure you know fine detail such as facts and statistics alongside key names and figures. Like the thehistorybore, evaluating interpretations is vital to achieving high grades as most questions are worded like that.
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Jamii
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(Original post by Miss.Unknow)
Hey!
I'm revising for history AS exam and i did GCSE last year. This was my method.
1. Make a timetable for history, make sure you have plenty of time to fit all the topics in without having to rush them.
2. create a mind map, it might get a bit boring having to read and write down notes, so why not make a colourful mind map that you could use for quick revision when before the real exam.
3. If you do get bored with notes, how about you watch some videos,documentaries or a historical movie that could help you with your topic, there's plenty of videos on Youtube.
4. i like to draw the events i read about! not a big detailed drawing, just a small sketch (even stick man) that would help me memorise it! print pictures if it helps.
5. Read examiner reports! they give feedback on what some students lacked in the exam. very useful tips for the future.
6. Exam Q and sources, find as many sources online as you can get and make up Q in your head and practice how to answer them! Don't forget to do real exam papers!
Hope this helps, if you have any Q feel free to ask!
Hi! These were so useful, thank you so much! I love mind maps but I always get stuck on how to actually structure them and how much detail they should be in, if that makes sense? I'm usually so afraid of missing key information I end up writing paragraphs in a bubble haha! Thanks again
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thehistorybore
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(Original post by Jamii)
This is such a good idea, thank you! I love a good table... Which topics do you do tables on, is it like significant events or things mentioned in the syllabus? Thanks so much!
The table included everything really; although mostly it worked as a mini-essay plan, so it more had points of argument than events Obviously that often includes events!
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Edminzodo
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Mind maps! I got a good UMS score last year making mind maps, a few timelines and notes, then doing some past papers.

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Jamii
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(Original post by Edminzodo)
Mind maps! I got a good UMS score last year making mind maps, a few timelines and notes, then doing some past papers.

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Hi! Thanks for your reply! Yeah I love Mindmaps and did them for GCSE but I struggle making them concise enough considering A-Levels have so much stuff! Do you do one event per page/mindmap or topics, if that makes sense? Thank you so much! 😊
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Miss.Unknow
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(Original post by Jamii)
Hi! These were so useful, thank you so much! I love mind maps but I always get stuck on how to actually structure them and how much detail they should be in, if that makes sense? I'm usually so afraid of missing key information I end up writing paragraphs in a bubble haha! Thanks again
If you want i could give you ideas on how to structure and make a mindmap. What topics do you do? I'm doing the Cold War
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Fleming1928
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Is anyone here doing the debates about the holocaust exam?
The exam is at the end of this month and I just want to cry.
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Jamii
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(Original post by Miss.Unknow)
If you want i could give you ideas on how to structure and make a mindmap. What topics do you do? I'm doing the Cold War
Thank you so much! Yeah I'm doing Edexcel I'm not doing Cold War though, I'm doing civil rights and stuff, the democracies in change topic thanks again!
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Miss.Unknow
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(Original post by Jamii)
Thank you so much! Yeah I'm doing Edexcel I'm not doing Cold War though, I'm doing civil rights and stuff, the democracies in change topic thanks again!
Ahh okay, this is how i would do it: (i'm not really sure on the topics but here are cause i dont do civil rights but ideas that i got from the internet)
I would make one mind map on campaigns:
Mind Map 1
Campaigns 1960-1966 with sub heading coming out:
For each one i would write about the events, people involved, strengths and weaknesses, what it achieved etc.
• Greensboro 1960
• Freedom Rides 1961
• James Meredith 1961
• Albany 1961-62
• Birmingham 1963
• Washington 1963
• Civil Rights Act 1964
• Selma 1965
Voting Rights Act 1965
• Campaigns in north
Mind Map 2
Important figures: How each figure contributed towards the civil rights
Martin Luther King
Malcolm X
Rosa Parks
Presidents:
Truman
Eisenhower
Kennedy
Johnson
Mind Map 3
Important events that occurred between 1945-1960 ( same with the campaign)
Brown 1954
Montgomery 1955-56
Little Rock 1957
Other events you can write about in a separate mind map
Great War
Sense of Community
The Depression
NAACP ( and other groups)
Second World War
(How did these events shape the civil rights)

Sorry if some of the events don't match up with your specification, i got these from the internet and some from my own knowledge back in GCSE. Hope it helped!
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Edminzodo
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(Original post by Jamii)
Hi! Thanks for your reply! Yeah I love Mindmaps and did them for GCSE but I struggle making them concise enough considering A-Levels have so much stuff! Do you do one event per page/mindmap or topics, if that makes sense? Thank you so much! 😊
I did one per decade last year, then also one per event and also key individuals, so there was some overlap but this actually helped. I did general ones on the economy etc as well!

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sarah_1998
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Is anyone on OCR doing Democracy and Dictatorships or The early Tudors? I feel like I'm gonna do well on Democracy and Dictatorship but for some reason, I can't seem recall much at all about Tudors
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