Subject Reading Suggestions Thread

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ByronicHero
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ByronicHero
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I will add to this later or tomorrow when I get a chance to look through the rest of the boxes and have a think about some other subjects, such as psychology. I will also tidy this up and add far more in the way of links and advice but that will be an ongoing process. Mainly I just wanted to get something posted so that I am reminded to update it when I have the time and inclination.

Please do furnish the thread with relevant suggestions if you have them. What did you include in your personal statements?
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Edminzodo
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This is a great idea for a thread and I hope you get lots of replies!

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ByronicHero
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(Original post by Edminzodo)
This is a great idea for a thread and I hope you get lots of replies!

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Ideally yes, but as long as at some point some people come along to plug the gaps in my knowledge I'll be happy.

I need to have a think about what I want to include, and see what I can find open links to, but I can hopefully add a bunch of journal articles tomorrow if I remember - especially for things like psychology. I know I have quite a few saved somewhere so should be able to work something out.

It's a work in progress
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Kvothe the Arcane
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Excellent thread as usual, ByronicHero .

Reserving my place for if I think of suggestions over the weekend.
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ByronicHero
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(Original post by Kvothe the arcane)
Excellent thread as usual, ByronicHero .

Reserving my place for if I think of suggestions over the weekend.
Thanks

STEM recommendations would be fantastic. I have reads a bunch of popsci, and have listed a few, but really don't have any interesting suggestions. I will find some university reading lists later though.
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Interrobang
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There are probably some threads in the subject forums with reading stuff - I know there is in psychology, for example, but it's always good to add more
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ByronicHero
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(Original post by *Interrobang*)
There are probably some threads in the subject forums with reading stuff - I know there is in psychology, for example, but it's always good to add more
Okay cool I will make sure to link to it. I do have some more psychology suggestions to make but no doubt the list you guys have made is better. Thanks
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PQ
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(Original post by ByronicHero)
Thanks

STEM recommendations would be fantastic. I have reads a bunch of popsci, and have listed a few, but really don't have any interesting suggestions. I will find some university reading lists later though.
These aren't exactly books (because I don't like books for STEM - blogs, research papers, events etc are much more transferable to degree study)

For Chemistry
http://chemnet.rsc.org/home (has a magazine and a bunch of blogs with digestible chemistry news - much better than the tired "reading the new scientist" quote that people put on their applications).
http://www.rsc.org/events/?searchtex...&pagetitle=177 <= public lectures on Chemistry. They're unfortunately all in London but most universities will have their own public lecture series as well as activities around science week to get involved in)

For Chemical Engineering
http://ichemeblog.org/ <= an outstanding blog that discusses loads of interesting chemeng topics

For Physics
http://physicsworld.com/ <= summary of physics news
http://www.iop.org/events/public/index.html <= public events
http://www.iop.org/events/education/index.html <= educational events
http://www.physics.org/ <= iop pages aimed at school age students

For Biology
https://www.rsb.org.uk/students <= signposting page to resources and competitions and events
http://www.nhm.ac.uk/our-science/science-events.html
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00g9xj0

For science in general:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b036...pisodes/player and http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b006...dcasts/2013/06


(oh and for English http://www.informationisbeautiful.ne...d-interactive/ is worth a look as is http://www.informationisbeautiful.ne...d-interactive/ for pretty much any subject)
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Student403
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Aerospace Engineering: https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=...C8wU3_lsaSh2aA
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ByronicHero
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(Original post by PQ)
These aren't exactly books (because I don't like books for STEM - blogs, research papers, events etc are much more transferable to degree study)

For Chemistry
http://chemnet.rsc.org/home (has a magazine and a bunch of blogs with digestible chemistry news - much better than the tired "reading the new scientist" quote that people put on their applications).
http://www.rsc.org/events/?searchtex...&pagetitle=177 <= public lectures on Chemistry. They're unfortunately all in London but most universities will have their own public lecture series as well as activities around science week to get involved in)

For Chemical Engineering
http://ichemeblog.org/ <= an outstanding blog that discusses loads of interesting chemeng topics

For Physics
http://physicsworld.com/ <= summary of physics news
http://www.iop.org/events/public/index.html <= public events
http://www.iop.org/events/education/index.html <= educational events
http://www.physics.org/ <= iop pages aimed at school age students

For Biology
https://www.rsb.org.uk/students <= signposting page to resources and competitions and events
http://www.nhm.ac.uk/our-science/science-events.html
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00g9xj0

For science in general:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b036...pisodes/player and http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b006...dcasts/2013/06


(oh and for English http://www.informationisbeautiful.ne...d-interactive/ is worth a look as is http://www.informationisbeautiful.ne...d-interactive/ for pretty much any subject)
Awesome, thanks. I will update the OP shortly
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ByronicHero
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(Original post by toronto353)
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Would you say there are any glaring omissions from my classics list? I think it is a reasonable sampling but you are the person I know best placed to add to this list
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toronto353
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(Original post by ByronicHero)
Classics

The Annuls of Imperial Rome - Tacitus
The Early History of Rome - Livy
The Twelve Caesars - Suetonius
Defence Speeches - Cicero
Metamorphoses - Ovid

Oedipus The King - Sophocles
Oedipus at Colonus - Sophocles
Antigone - Sophocles
Alcestis and other plays - Euripides
Medea and other plays - Euripides
The Metaphysics - Aristotle
The Nicomachean Ethics - Aristotle
The Aenid - Virgil
The Odyssey - Homer

Early Socratic Dialogues - Plato
Plato - Complete Works - Ed. John M. Cooper

The First Philosophers, The Presocratics and the Sophists - trans. Robin Waterfield
Neoplatonic Philosophy - John Dillon

The Oxford Classical Dictionary
I've correct the few typos I saw I'd recommend Aeschylus' Oresteia as the only extant example of a complete tragic trilogy, Aristophanes' comedies (all eleven are good, but I'd recommend Lysistrata, as it seems to be well-known and has been performed at a number of anti-war rallies, Clouds, since it features Socrates, and Wealth, because it is an example of Aristophanes' later work). I'd also recommend Menander's comedies (particularly Dyscolos the only surviving complete example of New Comedy). Thucydides' History of the Peloponnesian War and Herodotus' Histories are good fun and great to contrast in style. For Homer, you'll also want to add the Iliad, earlier than the Odyssey and possibly also Martin West's Greek Epic Fragments which will give people a much better sense of what we are missing from epic and which I didn't realise until now is freely available from the internet archive (https://archive.org/details/L497Gree...agmentsVIIVcBC). I'd recommend all of Sophocles' and Euripides' plays, especially Euripides' Cyclops, the only complete example of satyr drama, Aristotle's Poetics, and possibly Apollonius' Argonautica, a later example of Greek epic.

I think that's all I can think of on the Greek side for now, but I shall check what I've got to see if there's anything else that is useful. In terms of Latin, you've got a good smattering of stuff there already. I'd be tempted to add in Catullus' poetry (on the whole very short) and also Horace in general really. Pliny the younger's Epistles make for some interesting reading and I'd add some Senecan philosophy in there. On drama, perhaps Plautus' and Terence's comedies should be included (they're all decent works so I offer no particular suggestions) and also Seneca's tragedies.

General reading, the very short introduction series has good grounding of many of the topics of the ancient world and from there should provide useful bibliography. The Cambridge Companions are also worth perusing as well.

In terms of internet sources, the perseus digital library is a must to have on bookmarks (http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/) as is poetry in translation (http://www.poetryintranslation.com/index.html). The Loeb Classical Library is now fully online (subscription required - http://www.loebclassics.com/) and the internet archive can be a great source of translations, though be aware that some may be old and therefore difficult to read compared to more modern translations.
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ByronicHero
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(Original post by toronto353)
I've correct the few typos I saw I'd recommend Aeschylus' Oresteia as the only extant example of a complete tragic trilogy, Aristophanes' comedies (all eleven are good, but I'd recommend Lysistrata, as it seems to be well-known and has been performed at a number of anti-war rallies, Clouds, since it features Socrates, and Wealth, because it is an example of Aristophanes' later work). I'd also recommend Menander's comedies (particularly Dyscolos the only surviving complete example of New Comedy). Thucydides' History of the Peloponnesian War and Herodotus' Histories are good fun and great to contrast in style. For Homer, you'll also want to add the Iliad, earlier than the Odyssey and possibly also Martin West's Greek Epic Fragments which will give people a much better sense of what we are missing from epic and which I didn't realise until now is freely available from the internet archive (https://archive.org/details/L497Gree...agmentsVIIVcBC). I'd recommend all of Sophocles' and Euripides' plays, especially Euripides' Cyclops, the only complete example of satyr drama, Aristotle's Poetics, and possibly Apollonius' Argonautica, a later example of Greek epic.

I think that's all I can think of on the Greek side for now, but I shall check what I've got to see if there's anything else that is useful. In terms of Latin, you've got a good smattering of stuff there already. I'd be tempted to add in Catullus' poetry (on the whole very short) and also Horace in general really. Pliny the younger's Epistles make for some interesting reading and I'd add some Senecan philosophy in there. On drama, perhaps Plautus' and Terence's comedies should be included (they're all decent works so I offer no particular suggestions) and also Seneca's tragedies.

General reading, the very short introduction series has good grounding of many of the topics of the ancient world and from there should provide useful bibliography. The Cambridge Companions are also worth perusing as well.

In terms of internet sources, the perseus digital library is a must to have on bookmarks (http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/) as is poetry in translation (http://www.poetryintranslation.com/index.html). The Loeb Classical Library is now fully online (subscription required - http://www.loebclassics.com/) and the internet archive can be a great source of translations, though be aware that some may be old and therefore difficult to read compared to more modern translations.
Yes, I mainly just added all of the things I own - and apparently far too quickly if I made a bunch of typos :lol:

I will definitely integrate this into the OP and place you among the contributors! Pretty stupid to forget Thucydides :facepalm2:

You've been a great help - thanks mate!
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Interrobang
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For psychology, there are also these threads (unfortunately not stickied, so not easy to find! I've put them in the psychology PS article):

http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=1353596 and
http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=2739866
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toronto353
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(Original post by ByronicHero)
Yes, I mainly just added all of the things I own - and apparently far too quickly if I made a bunch of typos :lol:

I will definitely integrate this into the OP and place you among the contributors! Pretty stupid to forget Thucydides :facepalm2:

You've been a great help - thanks mate!
I'm very impressed that you owned all of those works really - you clearly appreciate what is the pinacle of culture

Thanks and I try to forget Thucydides as well - his Greek is very difficult, so I only use him in my work where absolutely necessary.

No problem, it was great fun thinking of what is needed. I was going to suggest Lysias and Demosthenes, but Cicero is a far better introduction to ancient rhetoric.
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ByronicHero
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(Original post by toronto353)
I'm very impressed that you owned all of those works really - you clearly appreciate what is the pinacle of culture

Thanks and I try to forget Thucydides as well - his Greek is very difficult, so I only use him in my work where absolutely necessary.

No problem, it was great fun thinking of what is needed. I was going to suggest Lysias and Demosthenes, but Cicero is a far better introduction to ancient rhetoric.
I try to acquire an array of works in each subject area in the interests of general education. Well, every non-stem subject anyway Of course owning them and reading them to any particular effect are totally different things :lol:
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ByronicHero
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(Original post by *Interrobang*)
For psychology, there are also these threads (unfortunately not stickied, so not easy to find! I've put them in the psychology PS article):

http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=1353596 and
http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=2739866
Ah they look fantastic. Thanks!
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(Original post by ByronicHero)
snip
I'd recommend these for any history applicant with a strong interest in European history:

The Celts: a history from the earliest times to the present - Bernhard Maier
A History of Scandinavia - TK Derry
Russia and the Russians: A History - Geoffrey Hosking
Ireland, 1798-1998: War, Peace and Beyond - Alvin Jackson
The Oxford History of the French Revolution - William Doyle
Iron Curtain: The Crushing of Eastern Europe, 1944-1956 - Anne Applebaum
Gulag: A History - Anne Applebaum
The Ukrainians: Unexpected Nation - Andrew Wilson
A World Without Jews: The Nazi Imagination from Persecution to Genocide - Alon Confino

But I would also recommend the following radio programmes:

Germany: Memories of a Nation
The Invention of Germany
The Invention of France
The Invention of Italy
The Invention of Spain
A History of the World in 100 Objects
China: As History is my Witness
In Our Time
The Making of the Modern Arab World
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PQ
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http://podcasts.ox.ac.uk/units <= hundreds of free online lectures for any subject you can imagine
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