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    I'll loose access to the latest research?

    I don't know whether this is a silly question or not, but my plan is to take a year out after graduating uni, to earn money and save for a Masters a year after. However, I've just been looking into possible masters, and for most you have to submit a proposal of your research idea, which includes a summary of the research background. However, when I graduate, I'll loose access to all the online journal articles I've taken for granted the past three years. I'm just wondering how you manage to stay in touch with academia, and write such a research proposal, when you no longer have access to academic journals?

    I know you can purchase a journal article, but it is not cheap.
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    If you wanted to take a gap year after graduating in 2016 and start a Masters in 2017, then you'll be applying during your gap year. My undergrad uni maintained online accesses for alumni for a full year after the end of their degree - check with your uni to see whether you will have something similar available.

    Failing that, you should be able to arrange access to paper copies of journals through either your current uni, or whichever uni you end up closest to if you move away after graduation.
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    (Original post by Twinpeaks)
    I'll loose access to the latest research?
    .
    A research proposal for a Masters rarely needs to have that degree of depth - though maybe that's subject specific. But the proposal doesn't contain research, it contains the justification of an interesting research question and evidence of a plan to provide an answer in the appropriate time, word count, resources etc. It doesn't require extensive footnotes, bibliography etc. One year's worth of loss of contact with journals isn't the sort of disengagement from academe that will cause a problem.
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    Its subject dependent but for some subjects it's easy to get articles etc through a google search.
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    How it worked for me is that I discussed a potential project first with the supervisor, before we came up with a suitable project together. It went like this:

    I find his research page on the university website, look at his papers.
    Read a few that are open access.
    Email him to ask about projects, he invites me to meeting.
    Talk with him about his current research, he gives me an idea he wants to pursue, I agree to it.
    I start the research.

    Good luck!
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    (Original post by twoforjoy)
    How it worked for me is that I discussed a potential project first with the supervisor, before we came up with a suitable project together. It went like this:

    I find his research page on the university website, look at his papers.
    Read a few that are open access.
    Email him to ask about projects, he invites me to meeting.
    Talk with him about his current research, he gives me an idea he wants to pursue, I agree to it.
    I start the research.

    Good luck!
    Thanks for the reply, that sounds ideal!!

    So I'm assuming you returned for a Masters after taking some time off, how did you find going back into academia if that was the case?

    Also, how do you think a research masters is a better option than a taught one?
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    (Original post by Twinpeaks)
    Thanks for the reply, that sounds ideal!!

    So I'm assuming you returned for a Masters after taking some time off, how did you find going back into academia if that was the case?

    Also, how do you think a research masters is a better option than a taught one?
    If the following apply to you then a research masters is more suitable:

    -You prefer independent research/one-to-one discussion over small group, seminar learning.
    -You have a strong focus on a particular area and could comfortably write a 1-2 page research proposal.
    -You are already confident that you want to pursue a PhD.

    If not, go for a taught. Most people are not certain on their main research focus so tend to do a taught in order to develop ideas before the summer dissertation. Also bear in mind that research masters tend to be cheaper than taught.

    Personally I never attended my BA because small group learning is ineffective for me (no matter how much universities declare it is the only way to learn and compulsory for everyone - I got a 1st despite nearly being kicked out for non-attendance so go figure). I like the idea of spending a whole year on one long thesis with my full attention; it's much closer to the PhD experience than a taught masters which is effectively just another final year of undergrad, i.e. taught units followed by a small dissertation. If you relate to this then go for the research option. Best of luck.
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    (Original post by Twinpeaks)
    I'll loose access to the latest research?

    I don't know whether this is a silly question or not, but my plan is to take a year out after graduating uni, to earn money and save for a Masters a year after. However, I've just been looking into possible masters, and for most you have to submit a proposal of your research idea, which includes a summary of the research background. However, when I graduate, I'll loose access to all the online journal articles I've taken for granted the past three years. I'm just wondering how you manage to stay in touch with academia, and write such a research proposal, when you no longer have access to academic journals?

    I know you can purchase a journal article, but it is not cheap.
    As Klix said, my uni also provides alumni access to some journals - I think it might be everything on JSTOR? Worth looking into anyway. You'll also be likely eligible for an alumni library card, so you could go & look at physical books or journals, or use the library computers to access material.

    Another thing you could think about doing, if you knew approximately the area you might like to research, is you could use databases and other search engines to find a load of articles to download before you leave university. You don't need to read them at once, just save them all together in a file for another time.

    Finally, as threeportdrift said, I wouldn't worry massively about the level of detail required for research proposals. Especially at master's level, they usually don't require lots of information, and are more used to match up your interests with the course, and a potential supervisor.
 
 
 
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