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    I have always wanted to become a nurse in mental health however never got my level 3 qualifications for personal reasons so am unable to go to university. I currently work as a HCA in a hospital but am struggling with financially supporting myself now or in the future, I'm genuinely starting to fear having to move out etc. (I currently live with my mum) I thought about doing an access to nursing course when I've suddenly realised I don't know if this is what I want to do, Ive watched nurses at work and I always watch them do drug rounds and take bloods and cannulate etc and love learning it but I don't know if I would be able to actually do it and don't want to spend time doing courses if i'm not sure its what I want to do..how an earth do I figure out what to do? I know i'm young and shouldn't worrying etc etc but I am worrying and I don't know what to do and I need advice on how to choose where to go next, is university even right for me and if not what other jobs are available to me? I love caring for people but I need to balance that with actually earning enough to live which I'm not currently doing and they're gunna scrap band 3 HCA's so I'll never really be able to earn more in my current job
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    (Original post by emilyfran)
    Thanks
    Hey!
    In what area do you work as a HCA? A nurses role can be so varied it's impossible to say if you would definitely hate it or not unless you get some more experience and an idea of where you want to work.
    Nurses now go on to do masters, phds, prescribing, teaching etc. They can also work in hospitals, the community and so on. So please don't look at the nurses you work with and think that's all a nurse may do or all you could end up doing.
    Try and work in other areas or do some volunteering to get a broader idea if what can be involved in nursing.

    University can be difficult and can be a reason why many people drop out, due to the workload etc.
    However, NHS England are now looking to introduce a band 4 role which will be seen as a nursing associate (not its official title as yet). This would be better pay, and have more responsibility than a band 3. They are looking to see if this itroduction of such will help people like yourself in becoming nurses. (Worth reading up on).

    There are also other jobs which involve caring for people that doesn't have to be a nurse. And only you can decide if university is right for you. A nursing course is different to other university courses and some may say you don't get to have the typical student lifestyle due to the demands of the course. However, if you're passionate about the course then that's something worth sacrificing.
    Do a little bit of research and try volunteering in other areas that involve people to see what you may like to do.

    There is no hurry at all. Many people that do nursing for example are doing it as a second degree and are mature students.
    Best of luck!


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    Like the previous post said - the opportunity's in nursing is fairly varied but not as much as the profession likes to make out. It really depends if you see yourself as a generalist or a specialist?

    While nursing offers a good bursary from the Health Department it is also possible to do agency work as a HCA while you're a student nurse and earn up 20 pounds an hour, or more to help you through university.

    However, nursing has a strong emphasis on achademic ability now too. You will find 50% of your time spent in class or doing assignments. You will learn how to write and critically think to advance practice as well as learn and begin to practice the more clinical skills of a modern day nurse.

    Once you are qualified the pay isn't wonderful considering the demands and level of responsibility that you will have working in the NHS. I don't want to tar all nurses with the same brush as I am one myself but a lot are looking for jobs away from direct patient care, off the front like and wanting to specialise in more 'easier' positions with friendlier family working hours and less stress.

    However, other speciality to consider are things that you get paid for training, for example one of the NHS Clinical Scientist roles such as
    - Cardiac Physiology (the people who take ECG, stress tests, ECHOs and pacemaking clinics) You can pretty much get a physiologist for each system of the body, e.g GI and Respiratory. However places in these programs are highly competitive.
    - SALT (Speech and Language Therapy - helping people speak after stroke and swallowing assessments)
    - Audiology (Hearing assessment and hearing aid)

    There is loads of positions. It depends what interests you. If you like stress and the life saving stuff then become a nurse. When the **** hits the fan people either want a nurse or a doctor around and non of the above professions. It's a rewarding career.

    But try eliminate the 'I don't know if I'll be able too' attitude.
    Don't procrastinate too long and don't let fear of failure hold you back.

    Good luck.
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    (Original post by Garrod)
    Like the previous post said - the opportunity's in nursing is fairly varied but not as much as the profession likes to make out. It really depends if you see yourself as a generalist or a specialist?

    While nursing offers a good bursary from the Health Department it is also possible to do agency work as a HCA while you're a student nurse and earn up 20 pounds an hour, or more to help you through university.

    However, nursing has a strong emphasis on achademic ability now too. You will find 50% of your time spent in class or doing assignments. You will learn how to write and critically think to advance practice as well as learn and begin to practice the more clinical skills of a modern day nurse.

    Once you are qualified the pay isn't wonderful considering the demands and level of responsibility that you will have working in the NHS. I don't want to tar all nurses with the same brush as I am one myself but a lot are looking for jobs away from direct patient care, off the front like and wanting to specialise in more 'easier' positions with friendlier family working hours and less stress.

    However, other speciality to consider are things that you get paid for training, for example one of the NHS Clinical Scientist roles such as
    - Cardiac Physiology (the people who take ECG, stress tests, ECHOs and pacemaking clinics) You can pretty much get a physiologist for each system of the body, e.g GI and Respiratory. However places in these programs are highly competitive.
    - SALT (Speech and Language Therapy - helping people speak after stroke and swallowing assessments)
    - Audiology (Hearing assessment and hearing aid)

    There is loads of positions. It depends what interests you. If you like stress and the life saving stuff then become a nurse. When the **** hits the fan people either want a nurse or a doctor around and non of the above professions. It's a rewarding career.

    But try eliminate the 'I don't know if I'll be able too' attitude.
    Don't procrastinate too long and don't let fear of failure hold you back.

    Good luck.
    Just to clarify, if you study some healthcare roles you don't have to pay fees at uni and you can get a student loan. (I think this applies to physiotherapy, podiatry, nursing.) Unfortunately you have to pay your own fees for audiology (and I think cardiac physiology), but you can still apply for a student loan.

    I agree with what the others say - see if you can find out a bit more nursing and other healthcare professions, then decide. Once you decide, you need to be really enthusiastic when applying, so best to be sure and commit.

    Good luck - sounds like you are a caring person and could offer a lot
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    (Original post by emilyfran)
    I have always wanted to become a nurse in mental health however never got my level 3 qualifications for personal reasons so am unable to go to university. I currently work as a HCA in a hospital but am struggling with financially supporting myself now or in the future, I'm genuinely starting to fear having to move out etc. (I currently live with my mum) I thought about doing an access to nursing course when I've suddenly realised I don't know if this is what I want to do, Ive watched nurses at work and I always watch them do drug rounds and take bloods and cannulate etc and love learning it but I don't know if I would be able to actually do it and don't want to spend time doing courses if i'm not sure its what I want to do..how an earth do I figure out what to do? I know i'm young and shouldn't worrying etc etc but I am worrying and I don't know what to do and I need advice on how to choose where to go next, is university even right for me and if not what other jobs are available to me? I love caring for people but I need to balance that with actually earning enough to live which I'm not currently doing and they're gunna scrap band 3 HCA's so I'll never really be able to earn more in my current job
    Thanks
    Doing a nursing degree is challenging. A large number of students come in via the Access to nursing route and are very successful. If you have a full time job as an HCA in the NHS they can second you so you still get your HCA pay but you do need to get the basic entry qualifications. Have you look at the NHS careers website which shows all the different jobs available
    https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/
    good luck
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    Hello, I graduated and want a prestigious job , considered here http: //nursection.com/nurse-practitioner-jobs/, who is familiar with this resource please answer and tell , and that all is written like a fairly, and pretty good, but need advice , I hope you guys !
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    (Original post by emilyfran)
    I have always wanted to become a nurse in mental health however never got my level 3 qualifications for personal reasons so am unable to go to university. I currently work as a HCA in a hospital but am struggling with financially supporting myself now or in the future, I'm genuinely starting to fear having to move out etc. (I currently live with my mum) I thought about doing an access to nursing course when I've suddenly realised I don't know if this is what I want to do, Ive watched nurses at work and I always watch them do drug rounds and take bloods and cannulate etc and love learning it but I don't know if I would be able to actually do it and don't want to spend time doing courses if i'm not sure its what I want to do..how an earth do I figure out what to do? I know i'm young and shouldn't worrying etc etc but I am worrying and I don't know what to do and I need advice on how to choose where to go next, is university even right for me and if not what other jobs are available to me? I love caring for people but I need to balance that with actually earning enough to live which I'm not currently doing and they're gunna scrap band 3 HCA's so I'll never really be able to earn more in my current job
    Thanks
    Hi. Sorry but im not too sure how to advise you as it's difficult to answer. Access to nursing may be a good stepping stone. I know someone who's doing that. I have worked as a HCA after studying Health and Psychology at uni but dont want to become a nurse although I love working in a supportive role. Are they really scrapping Band 3 HCAs? How come and what will replace them or will it just be Band 2? Please could you tell me more and where did you find out about it? x

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    I am in a similar position

    Working as a HCA outside the nhs, no development opportunities

    Want to develop my career in healthcare, but not sure about pursuing nursing

    Anxious about university study because of cost, commitment, moving away


    So I am still trying to figure out what I want to do! I just wish my nearest uni had a bigger variety of healthcare degrees!

    But I have considered:

    Operating Department Practice... 2 or 3 year cert or degree... popular amongst mature students and career changes

    Podiatry, Physiotherapy, Audiology, Orthotics... specialist areas are good but usually require a good accademic/science background...

    Radiology... working in diagnostic imaging if you like technology and investigation and you have the potential to specialise in CT, MRI, Mammography etc... less emphasis on the care side of things

    Nutrition/diatetics... helping to educate and teach others as well as getting involved in special diets (renal diets etc) or weight management etc... degrees like a chemistry background though...

    But you can also try and branch out and apply for other jobs if your interested in a change... look for jobs like theatre support worker, podiatry assistant, dietetic assistant, therapy assistant, radiography helper, dialysis assistant etc and you may get the opportunity to test the water in a new area which will help you to decide what to do next! Good luck!
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    Hi I always wanted to be a nurse, I am coming to the end of an access course which I have found really beneficial. I have decided that nursing is not for me. The access course is aimed at other health professionals such as physiotherapists, science subjects, mental health and others. I have decided to go into ODP you will find the route for you. Try work experience or bank hca see what areas you enjoy and speak to someone in education.
 
 
 
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