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    I have received offers from 4 universities for economics, but I have also received an offer for industrial economics from the final university

    I was hoping someone could highlight the benefits/disadvantages of the industrial economics course vs economics and if there is a major difference, as I am not entirely sure of the difference

    Thanks for any replies
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    What universities? BA or BSc? What do you want to do after university? It's pretty much impossible to answer your question without knowing the answers to the above. But generally I would say there is no difference.
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    (Original post by Snufkin)
    What universities? BA or BSc? What do you want to do after university? It's pretty much impossible to answer your question without knowing the answers to the above. But generally I would say there is no difference.
    Manchester, Queen Mary's and York have offered me a place for economics. Exeter have offered me a place for economics with a year in placement and Nottingham are the ones who have offered me a place in industrial economics. They are all Bsc and in terms of what I want to do after uni, I really dont have much of an idea.

    Thanks for your help
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    In some cases, a degree in industrial economics is the same as a degree in economics but with all the optional industrial economics modules compulsory. So if u have been admitted to a BSc economics you can make it more like or actually the same as the industrial economics degree by taking options in industrial economics.

    Of course, it might seems obvious that the you will still take many modules such as macroeconomics and microeconomics shared by both straight economics and industrial economics courses.
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    I would say that Industrial Economics is more of a Business Economics degree that is a bit more macro still. In other words, it's midway in between Economics and Business, the way I see it at least.

    With Industrial Economics you would likely have fewer choices in terms of optional modules.

    I have also received an offer from Nottingham from Industrial Economics, but mostly as a consolation offer for being refused from PPE... the two courses don't exactly have a lot in common with one another, and the kids at the offer holder's event did not seem terribly interested in the course. At least not on an intellectual level; they were mostly only concerned with work prospects and what not.

    I fear that Industrial Economics would be a bit too focused on Maths, so I wanted to ask you your opinion on this: would you say that someone who hates theoretical (pointless) maths would do well in the sort of maths required in a more numerically heavy econ degree? I'd say that there is a huge different in between pointless IGCSE Maths (which is more difficult than GCSE btw, so it edges into AS level territory quite a bit) and maths that you apply to a subject you love (say, economics).

    Regardless, Nottingham's Industrial Econ is very renowned, especially when it comes to employers in finance/accounting or more specifically investment banking. They seem to have great ties to such businesses and it's the first Industrial Econ degree to have been offered. I think it's been offered for more than a few decades now.

    So, welp, economics itself is a bit unfocused, so if you want great employment opportunities, go for industrial economics. It's far more practical and just generally very prestigious. Nottingham is brilliant for economics in general too, I think.
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    I also received the industrial economics offer as consolation, I had originally applied for straight economics.
    I feel that an economics degree at exeter/York would hold better pedigree than industrial economics at Nottingham, hence my inclination to firm either of those, ahead of the nottingham offer
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    (Original post by Kaz_96)
    I also received the industrial economics offer as consolation, I had originally applied for straight economics.
    I feel that an economics degree at exeter/York would hold better pedigree than industrial economics at Nottingham, hence my inclination to firm either of those, ahead of the nottingham offer
    Yup, it seems like Notti's handing out Industrial Economics places a bit too earnestly. Another guy who was at the offer holder's event also received a lowered offer of ABB, so it's a bit worrying. In my case, they allow me to use my General Studies exam, but that may be because I would have 5 A levels and an MEI Core Maths qualification at the end of this year...

    York must be more prestigious than Exeter in economics though, consider York's top 10 ranking and Exeter's 18.

    But then, Nottingham is top 9, and this course would likely allow you far more employability than an Economics graduate, even if you're going for a BSC Econ. I guess that in the end it's not only the academic prestige of a course that matters most, but also the university's ties with employers.

    Considering today's over-saturated labor market, it's likely you would really benefit from having a uni with some of the best employment connections out there.

    But then, I don't really know much of the business links York or Exeter have, so you might know better.
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    (Original post by Caius Filimon G)
    Yup, it seems like Notti's handing out Industrial Economics places a bit too earnestly. Another guy who was at the offer holder's event also received a lowered offer of ABB, so it's a bit worrying. In my case, they allow me to use my General Studies exam, but that may be because I would have 5 A levels and an MEI Core Maths qualification at the end of this year...

    York must be more prestigious than Exeter in economics though, consider York's top 10 ranking and Exeter's 18.

    But then, Nottingham is top 9, and this course would likely allow you far more employability than an Economics graduate, even if you're going for a BSC Econ. I guess that in the end it's not only the academic prestige of a course that matters most, but also the university's ties with employers.

    Considering today's over-saturated labor market, it's likely you would really benefit from having a uni with some of the best employment connections out there.

    But then, I don't really know much of the business links York or Exeter have, so you might know better.
    Surprisingly Exeter is more higly ranked than York and the Exeter course I applied too has the year in placement, which as you seem to also think is a major benefit
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    (Original post by Kaz_96)
    Surprisingly Exeter is more higly ranked than York and the Exeter course I applied too has the year in placement, which as you seem to also think is a major benefit
    Apologies, I meant to say Exeter's better than York! Just swap the stuff around!

    And yes, but a placement would mean one more year of university, and more than 9000 pounds being spent. With Nottingham you'd have a very prestigious university vouching for you in the fields of investment banking/finance/accounting following your 3 years of uni. The companies would come to Nottingham itself to recruit too, to go work once you're a postgrad.

    But then again, Exeter might have a similar/just as good reputation/links as Nottingham, I wouldn't know.

    But the additional year would make up for it IF Exeter is not that great as Nottingham in the said area. But then again, that would be one additional year, and more student loans.
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    (Original post by Caius Filimon G)
    Apologies, I meant to say Exeter's better than York! Just swap the stuff around!

    And yes, but a placement would mean one more year of university, and more than 9000 pounds being spent. With Nottingham you'd have a very prestigious university vouching for you in the fields of investment banking/finance/accounting following your 3 years of uni. The companies would come to Nottingham itself to recruit too, to go work once you're a postgrad.

    But then again, Exeter might have a similar/just as good reputation/links as Nottingham, I wouldn't know.

    But the additional year would make up for it IF Exeter is not that great as Nottingham in the said area. But then again, that would be one additional year, and more student loans.
    Yh i see what your saying, however I feel that a economics degree from Exeter would be more attractive to employers industrial economics degree, hence I have practically disregarded my unconditional industrial economics degree offer from Nottingham. Also regarding the industrial year placement, I feel the links that you could obtain and having the possibility of a job lined up as you graduate is a massive opportunity, hence again my inclination to firm the exeter offer
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    (Original post by Kaz_96)
    Yh i see what your saying, however I feel that a economics degree from Exeter would be more attractive to employers industrial economics degree, hence I have practically disregarded my unconditional industrial economics degree offer from Nottingham. Also regarding the industrial year placement, I feel the links that you could obtain and having the possibility of a job lined up as you graduate is a massive opportunity, hence again my inclination to firm the exeter offer
    Oh so you received an unconditional from Industrial Economics, despite it being a consolation offer?

    Alright, now I'm on the edge of completely throwing away my IE offer. Too many people seem to be getting either lowered offers or even unconditionals as consolation offers. You might have been a very strong applicant, but a course that does all of these things is very likely under subscribed in one way or another. Yeah, actually, you might be better off with Exeter. I should've applied there :/

    But congrats on your offers! With Exeter you should be set for life, really.
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    (Original post by Caius Filimon G)
    I would say that Industrial Economics is more of a Business Economics degree that is a bit more macro still. In other words, it's midway in between Economics and Business, the way I see it at least.

    With Industrial Economics you would likely have fewer choices in terms of optional modules.

    I have also received an offer from Nottingham from Industrial Economics, but mostly as a consolation offer for being refused from PPE... the two courses don't exactly have a lot in common with one another, and the kids at the offer holder's event did not seem terribly interested in the course. At least not on an intellectual level; they were mostly only concerned with work prospects and what not.

    I fear that Industrial Economics would be a bit too focused on Maths, so I wanted to ask you your opinion on this: would you say that someone who hates theoretical (pointless) maths would do well in the sort of maths required in a more numerically heavy econ degree? I'd say that there is a huge different in between pointless IGCSE Maths (which is more difficult than GCSE btw, so it edges into AS level territory quite a bit) and maths that you apply to a subject you love (say, economics).

    Regardless, Nottingham's Industrial Econ is very renowned, especially when it comes to employers in finance/accounting or more specifically investment banking. They seem to have great ties to such businesses and it's the first Industrial Econ degree to have been offered. I think it's been offered for more than a few decades now.

    So, welp, economics itself is a bit unfocused, so if you want great employment opportunities, go for industrial economics. It's far more practical and just generally very prestigious. Nottingham is brilliant for economics in general too, I think.
    This is great advice, can I ask did you end up accepting Nottinghams offer for Industrial economics and if so, how do you find the course?

    I'm currently in a similar situation as I have an offer for Industrial Economics at Nottingham since I missed the required grades to do Economics. Although I love Nottingham as a uni I'm not very interested in business and I prefer Macroeconomics to Micro so I'm considering accepting my insurance's offer (Queen Mary) for economics although I don't particularly like the uni and I know nottingham is far better.
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    (Original post by Leah3852)
    This is great advice, can I ask did you end up accepting Nottinghams offer for Industrial economics and if so, how do you find the course?

    I'm currently in a similar situation as I have an offer for Industrial Economics at Nottingham since I missed the required grades to do Economics. Although I love Nottingham as a uni I'm not very interested in business and I prefer Macroeconomics to Micro so I'm considering accepting my insurance's offer (Queen Mary) for economics although I don't particularly like the uni and I know Nottingham is far better.
    Hi there, I am also in the same situation as you, however, I have accepted to study industrial Economics at Nottingham, I think the course looks very good and I will be able to pick some modules from the Economics School too. What did you decide to do in the end?
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    Hi, I am currently doing a foundation in economics at the University of Nottingham, and I am considering either industrial economics or international economics if you don't mind helping me by passing up your knowledge about industrial economics and if you find it useful or not.Thank You.
 
 
 
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