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    Hello!

    I am currently an American undergrad student studying theatre, looking to obtain my Bachelor of Fine Arts in May 2018. I just recently decided to pursue a career in law and I want nothing more than to study in the UK. I would be working towards qualifying as a solicitor after completing all of my training. Through my research, it seems that getting a law degree over there could be much cheaper than getting one here, especially if I want to end up living there anyway.

    I'm intending to graduate with my BFA as planned, then move over there to start the GDL. For people who have taken the GDL or are familiar with the process, I just need a better idea of what I should be doing now and what the process will be like once I get there. I've read a lot of things about getting a training contracts and how it's advised against to take the route I'm taking, etc. I know that this is what I want to do, but I'm just not sure what the most sensible way of going about it would be. Thank you in advance!
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    Are you in America?

    Do you have a right to work or live here? i.e UK passport?

    The GDL is just a condensed law course for non law grads that lasts one year afyer which you do the LPC which covers more practical aspects as prep for practice.
    The issue you have as an American is that you have no right to work here and that when you finish your course then you are expected to return to the US.

    It is possible to get a TC, but it is very competitive and an employer here needs to sponsor you to get a visa. They will have many other applicants who do not need a visa, so you have to be good and have soemthing about you to make them go to the trouble. You should be ready for how competitive that will be. Not impossible but its an extra hurdle. If you na get a TC, then it should be easy to get a job after assuming you get ecent training, then you should be kept on by your firm or find another firm.

    Wanting to end up living here if you dont have a passport or some familial connection to get a qualifying passport is challenging. You dont really give much detail.
    http://www.lawsociety.org.uk/law-car...g-a-solicitor/
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    I don't have any documentation that would allow me to stay in the UK at this point, no. But I was more asking to know what are some of the things that I would have to be aware of such as that, or the course in general. Essentially things that admissions people don't tell you, or obstacles that would arise simply because I'm American.

    I really want to live and practice law in the UK, which I'm aware is very unconventional, but I'd like to get some general advice about the course and the hurdles that I'll come into contact with throughout this process. Sorry if there isn't a lot of detail, it's a complicated situation for me, haha.
    (Original post by 999tigger)
    Are you in America?

    Do you have a right to work or live here? i.e UK passport?

    The GDL is just a condensed law course for non law grads that lasts one year afyer which you do the LPC which covers more practical aspects as prep for practice.
    The issue you have as an American is that you have no right to work here and that when you finish your course then you are expected to return to the US.

    It is possible to get a TC, but it is very competitive and an employer here needs to sponsor you to get a visa. They will have many other applicants who do not need a visa, so you have to be good and have soemthing about you to make them go to the trouble. You should be ready for how competitive that will be. Not impossible but its an extra hurdle. If you na get a TC, then it should be easy to get a job after assuming you get ecent training, then you should be kept on by your firm or find another firm.

    Wanting to end up living here if you dont have a passport or some familial connection to get a qualifying passport is challenging. You dont really give much detail.
    http://www.lawsociety.org.uk/law-car...g-a-solicitor/
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    I think most GDLs are pretty similar and many instututions offer them, so its just like picking a uni again. there should be no problem getting on an LPC assuming you did ok on the GDL its just a money hurdle.

    Im trying to make you aware that the problem isnt the course, because you can just pay for that, it is getting a firm to give you a training contract and then you have the additional hurdle in that you need a visa to work here. Without a TC you wont qualify, without a visa you cant do a TC.
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    I see what you're saying...
    In that case, what do you suggest I do right now? Like I said, I'm a theatre major currently, although I am working towards a minor in African-American Studies. I have a job, going on two years now and I'm currently looking for volunteering/internship opportunities at law firms.

    In your opinion, what can I do to make myself more likely to get a TC? I know it's a pretty broad question, but I don't really know much about it.


    (Original post by 999tigger)
    I think most GDLs are pretty similar and many instututions offer them, so its just like picking a uni again. there should be no problem getting on an LPC assuming you did ok on the GDL its just a money hurdle.

    Im trying to make you aware that the problem isnt the course, because you can just pay for that, it is getting a firm to give you a training contract and then you have the additional hurdle in that you need a visa to work here. Without a TC you wont qualify, without a visa you cant do a TC.
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    http://www.allaboutlaw.co.uk/law-courses/gdl

    Theres plenty of artciles on GDL there, nit its not that complicated.
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    You can get good grades and do interesting work exp. Do you have anything unusual or special in terms of skills or experience. What sort of law are you interested in?
    To get internships in the UK is very difficult its just competitive. Do some community legal work or DA or anything to give you variety that can make an interesting topic in interview. That will make it easier to get onto the GDL of your choice plus you need to know why law and why the UK to study and then to practice.
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    Well I'm currently studying my undergrad in America, so all of my work and volunteer experience would be here. I would literally pick up and move to the UK after graduation. Up to this point, I've only done theatre, honestly, so I'm working for the next two years to expand my skills. I guess the task itself is just daunting, but I have no doubt I could do it.

    I intially wanted to study media law because of my background in the entertainment industry, but now I'm considering discrimination law. I'll obviously make my mind up soon, but those are two fields I'm very passionate about.

    (Original post by 999tigger)
    You can get good grades and do interesting work exp. Do you have anything unusual or special in terms of skills or experience. What sort of law are you interested in?
    To get internships in the UK is very difficult its just competitive. Do some community legal work or DA or anything to give you variety that can make an interesting topic in interview. That will make it easier to get onto the GDL of your choice plus you need to know why law and why the UK to study and then to practice.
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    If you wnated to do media law then thats quite specialised. You should get some relevant experience over there in an appropriate firm. Discrimination law doesnt really exist over here as far as im aware, but would crop up for employment law. the only daunting point I cna think of is getting a TC which is the same for most other UK law graduates. I suppose investing the money as well. the other way is just o qualify in the US join a US firm with a London office and seek a transfer. Anyway GL.
 
 
 
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