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    Hey I heard there was a debate about he importance of a universities reputation when studying medicine on a thread somewhere. Anyone care to link it?
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    (Original post by Squishy•)
    Hey I heard there was a debate about he importance of a universities reputation when studying medicine on a thread somewhere. Anyone care to link it?
    If you really care, do a search. But those threads are **** because this is how they always go:

    Various trolls and non-medics: *insert subjective non-evidence based BS opinion trololol*

    Medical students/doctors: Prestige/reputation is completely unimportant in medicine, apply wherever you like and think you can get into.

    Who are you going to believe?
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    (Original post by Democracy)
    If you really care, do a search. But those threads are **** because this is how they always go:

    Various trolls and non-medics: *insert subjective non-evidence based BS opinion trololol*

    Medical students/doctors: Prestige/reputation is completely unimportant in medicine, apply wherever you like and think you can get into.

    Who are you going to believe?
    Ahh I would most likely believe medical students/doctors due to their experience however I wouldn't look at who is posting I would look at the evidence and arguments they put forward and evaluate them myself.
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    (Original post by Democracy)
    If you really care, do a search. But those threads are **** because this is how they always go:

    Various trolls and non-medics: *insert subjective non-evidence based BS opinion trololol*

    Medical students/doctors: Prestige/reputation is completely unimportant in medicine, apply wherever you like and think you can get into.

    Who are you going to believe?
    ^

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    (Original post by Democracy)
    If you really care, do a search. But those threads are **** because this is how they always go:

    Various trolls and non-medics: *insert subjective non-evidence based BS opinion trololol*

    Medical students/doctors: Prestige/reputation is completely unimportant in medicine, apply wherever you like and think you can get into.

    Who are you going to believe?
    I'm curious to know if there is a difference *outside* of the FPAS/specialty applications, which obviously are done using a transparent and strict selection criteria that don't reference the institution where you studied.

    For example, does institution play a role in gaining access to summer research placements, or elective placements, or when going for leadership positions? Do Oxford grads have an easier time of it from their higher ups and consultants than Peninsula or Keele grads?

    Just curious!
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    (Original post by prospectivemed56)
    I'm curious to know if there is a difference *outside* of the FPAS/specialty applications, which obviously are done using a transparent and strict selection criteria that don't reference the institution where you studied. For example, does institution play a role in gaining access to summer research placements, or elective placements, or when going for leadership positions? Do Oxford grads have an easier time of it from their higher ups and consultants than Peninsula or Keele grads?
    The simple answer is "no - it doesn't make any difference" and that is genuinely correct 99.5% of the time. The prestige of your medical school makes very little difference and is simply overshadowed by other things (grades, publications, prizes, clinical experience, personality, etc).

    It's probably true that some stuffy Oxbridge/London-education consultants will have funny views about Peninsula and Keele. I really don't think it's an important consideration for most, though. In a way, it could even be an advantage to be at a medical school where students aren't clawing each others' eyes out* as there might be more opportunities to distinguish yourself.

    * clearly an exaggeration !!
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    (Original post by Squishy•)
    Hey I heard there was a debate about he importance of a universities reputation when studying medicine on a thread somewhere. Anyone care to link it?
    Rep doesnt matter, but you might benefit from a better facility, such as at oxbridge, cardiff etc.

    Maybe rep matters for more senior positions such as consultancy? Im not well informed so take it with a pinch of salt.
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    Talking to people who are consultants they said that (and this is the example he gave so don't hate me) was if you are deciding between someone who went to Cambridge and someone who went to Plymouth you would be more inclined to look at the Cambridge graduate and therefore hire them. Other than Oxbridge, Imperial and UCL it doesn't really matter where you go as everyone receives practically the same training- its just the reputation that certain unis have for being extremely hard to get into that makes the differemce
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    I've never encountered any particular bias from consultants, and have worked entirely within the "golden triangle" so you'd think it would be more common there.

    I have, however, heard of some cocky Oxford medical students who felt it was appropriate to insult a registrar (Liverpool grad, clinically excellent) teaching them, on the grounds he "didn't go to a proper university." :mad:
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    (Original post by Helenia)
    I've never encountered any particular bias from consultants, and have worked entirely within the "golden triangle" so you'd think it would be more common there.

    I have, however, heard of some cocky Oxford medical students who felt it was appropriate to insult a registrar (Liverpool grad, clinically excellent) teaching them, on the grounds he "didn't go to a proper university." :mad:
    I hope they got a swift and proper bollicking for that. They won't last long if that's the attitude they come out with.

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    (Original post by Helenia)
    I have, however, heard of some cocky Oxford medical students who felt it was appropriate to insult a registrar (Liverpool grad, clinically excellent) teaching them, on the grounds he "didn't go to a proper university." :mad:
    The attitude of some of the med students I have met absolutely stinks. You can really tell them apart from those who have had prior hospital experience in a caring setting and those who have done the minimal bits with their family/friend connections.

    Fortunately F1 soon sorts these 'know it alls' out. Experienced doctors and patients don't care where you studied, just that you do your job properly and appropriately.

    We had this F1 who was extremely arrogant in front of and with patients, but she was soon running for the door with tears in her eyes when 4 of our male patients gave their, let's say, feedback on her bedside manner and abilities.

    Healthcare is humbling and I can't imagine there are many jobs with such a steep learning curve as the foundation years for doctors.
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    (Original post by prospectivemed56)
    I'm curious to know if there is a difference *outside* of the FPAS/specialty applications, which obviously are done using a transparent and strict selection criteria that don't reference the institution where you studied.

    For example, does institution play a role in gaining access to summer research placements, or elective placements, or when going for leadership positions? Do Oxford grads have an easier time of it from their higher ups and consultants than Peninsula or Keele grads?

    Just curious!
    There's some pretty good evidence out there that Oxbridge grads do better at postgrad exams like the MRCP, so it's not unlikely to suppose they do better when applying for positions as well. But I doubt that's anything to do with people positively selecting for Oxbridge grads, and more to do with the type of person who goes to Oxbridge
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    I'm also not well informed about medicine but I always thought its teaching had universal standards in the UK?
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    (Original post by Ghotay)
    There's some pretty good evidence out there that Oxbridge grads do better at postgrad exams like the MRCP, so it's not unlikely to suppose they do better when applying for positions as well. But I doubt that's anything to do with people positively selecting for Oxbridge grads, and more to do with the type of person who goes to Oxbridge
    Indeed. Although there are quite a lot of points for medical school prizes/distinctions etc in postgrad medical applications, which may be harder to achieve if you're in a cohort of people that tend to be very good at exams. :p:
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    Although I have to say my aunt used to work in hospitals in Cambridge and she said that they had the knowledge but they had no idea how to apply knowledge and how to do things clinically. Saying that, she graduated from St George's which does not have as good a reputation (something she admitted herself) but they train their students really well on how to interact with patients
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    Bath or bust.
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    (Original post by MonteCristo)
    The simple answer is "no - it doesn't make any difference" and that is genuinely correct 99.5% of the time. The prestige of your medical school makes very little difference and is simply overshadowed by other things (grades, publications, prizes, clinical experience, personality, etc).

    It's probably true that some stuffy Oxbridge/London-education consultants will have funny views about Peninsula and Keele. I really don't think it's an important consideration for most, though. In a way, it could even be an advantage to be at a medical school where students aren't clawing each others' eyes out* as there might be more opportunities to distinguish yourself.

    * clearly an exaggeration !!
    In my experience its more the foreign-educated doctors, where frequently prestige and hierarchy are everything, who have these kind of views.

    (Original post by JamesN88)
    I'm also not well informed about medicine but I always thought its teaching had universal standards in the UK?
    The GMC ensures a high minimum standard, but both the teaching methods and the actual content are very variable.
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    (Original post by nexttime)
    In my experience its more the foreign-educated doctors, where frequently prestige and hierarchy are everything, who have these kind of views.
    I'm thinking of a very particular type of older, white, male surgeon who is happiest when his house officer is a "good chap" that sails, skis, and plays rugby... In fairness it's almost inevitable that these guys were educated within the golden triangle as there were far fewer medical schools available to that generation. I suspect many are sporting D/E grades at A-level, though...
 
 
 
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