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sleep apnea advice watch

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    can this go away or is it a permanent thing?
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    (Original post by shawtyb)
    can this go away or is it a permanent thing?
    Depends on its cause, the NHS has some information about obstructive sleep apnoea: http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/Sleep-a...roduction.aspx
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    (Original post by moonkatt)
    Depends on its cause, the NHS has some information about obstructive sleep apnoea: http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/Sleep-a...roduction.aspx
    redbuthotter you are apnoea as :dolphin::dolphin::dolphin::dolphin: man
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    (Original post by moonkatt)
    Depends on its cause, the NHS has some information about obstructive sleep apnoea: http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/Sleep-a...roduction.aspx
    id read up on this. my son has an apnea attack in his sleep, only a mild one thankfully but the dr said as he has a cold, this may be part/all of the reason but its scared the :dolphin::dolphin::dolphin::dolphin: out of me for obvious reasons.
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    The goal is to keep the airway open so that breathing does not stop during sleep.

    The following lifestyle changes may relieve symptoms of sleep apnea in some people:

    Avoiding alcohol or sedatives at bedtime, which can make symptoms worse

    Avoiding sleeping on the back may help with mild sleep apnea

    Losing weight may decrease the number of apnea spells during the night

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is now the first treatment for obstructive sleep apnea in most people. CPAP is delivered by a machine with a tight-fitting face mask.

    Many patients have a hard time sleeping with CPAP therapy. Good follow-up and support from a sleep center can often help overcome any problems in using CPAP.

    Some patients may need dental devices inserted into the mouth at night to keep the jaw forward.

    Surgery may be an option in some cases. This may involve:

    Uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) -- to remove excess tissue at the back of the throat. This surgery has not been proven to completely clear up sleep apnea. Long-term side effects are also possible.

    More invasive surgeries -- to correct problems with the face structures in rare cases when patients have severe sleep apnea and treatment has not helped

    Tracheostomy -- to create an opening in the windpipe to bypass the blocked airway if there are physical problems (rarely done)

    Surgery to remove the tonsils and adenoids often cures the condition in children. It does not seem to help most adults.
 
 
 
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